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  2. Pentallion

    What's the effect of obsidian in Glorantha?

    yeah, that's why the agimori got so excited, but I'm no minerals expert and I can't find anything on obsidian in any of my RQ stuff.
  3. Bohemond

    Horses, birds, and cattle

    This makes Rinliddi avilry make more sense.
  4. Today
  5. Bohemond

    What's the effect of obsidian in Glorantha?

    Obsidian is associated with Lodril, isn't it? He built the Tower of Black Glass on the Shadow Plateau for Argan Argar. It's also probably associated with other volcanic deities, like Vestkarthen and Caladra and Aurelion. So it might be useful for fire magics.
  6. Russ Massey

    Bladesharp

    You would add it in with the modifiers for Sword Trance, until either expires. Generally speaking, you can't pick and choose when magical modifiers come into play if they're both cast on the same item at the same time. This was the answer given by Jason to a question in the rules thread, but I don't feel that it makes sense. Bladesharp is a spell that affects the weapon and not the weilder. It adds damage and a percentage to hit based on the number of points cast. If you are naturally 100% with your sword you can attack two different opponents at 50% each. If you have bladesharp 2 on your sword you will get +10% and +2 damage. Jason has ruled that the +10% is added before the split, so that you have 110% to divide against 2 opponents, but presumablythe +2 damage would apply to each hit. This seems nonsensical to me. An enhanced weapon should gain its bonuses each time it is used, and an additional percentage due it being magically sharp should surely apply against each opponent you are capable of attacking, just as the extra damage does. Thoughts?
  7. Thanks - that made me laugh!
  8. SDLeary

    Magical Fire and Accidental Arson

    Yup! There is a reason a good chunk of Rome had to be rebuilt so often. It wasn't just Nero. And of course, we can also talk about London. Old cities love untended, indiscriminate, or unintended flames. SDLeary
  9. My players came into an obsidian harpoon spear head from Harpoon and the Agimori is all excited and wants to know what he can do with it. Any ideas or knowledge?
  10. Narl

    Narl's Apple Lane Campaign Report

    Thanks, that is exactly the sort of thing I was looking for. I am going to add the spy element and Slythin will have some hidden knowledge she learned through spying. One thing I had already started for Slythin is that she pushes Iverne to aid and stay with the adventurers (particularly the Orlanthi) and that seems to fit with Alusar having aided Orlanth.
  11. TrippyHippy

    Before I buy 7th edition

    The execution is crunchy too. Character generation is more complex, and there are more rules to administer in the game. There are more rules to reference in the book. There's no resistance table, which is a moot point when it's been replaced by another table which calculates multiples of five also. You have stipulations in combat and chases that have to be managed. No, it doesn't run any faster. Nor does it run faster than the sort of systems it is trying to emulate - Savage Worlds and Fate, for example - which are designed from the ground up and have refined their game data by actually streamlining rather than bolting on new rules. If an experienced Keeper is finding 7E more crunchy than previous editions, the variable is the edition not the Keeper.
  12. Narl

    Narl's Apple Lane Campaign Report

    We were doing theater of the mind. If we were using a map that may have led us to play it out differently.
  13. Narl

    Narl's Apple Lane Campaign Report

    The bison rider moved to protect some of the party members on foot, the others were far enough out of the way. Though I could have made it more "interesting" I wanted the adventurers to focus on the interaction with Idrima and the potential for Danakos lurking about.
  14. VonKatzen

    Magical Fire and Accidental Arson

    Or in the case of a Roman tenement, dry wood with thatch roofing, walls filled with wood dust and soaked with the body oils of occupants and their meals. Combine that with the warm, dry conditions of the 1st c. BC-AD and you've got a lucrative money making scheme for your fire brigades.
  15. SDLeary

    Magical Fire and Accidental Arson

    Or thatch. Fun for the medieval pyros! SDLeary
  16. el_octogono

    Before I buy 7th edition

    To me, 7th edition is a step forward. It has a some more rules, but they are easy to grasp and memorize, and above all, covers many holes previous editions had. It's easier to handle opposed rolls, combat is swifter... the only thing that makes me itch are the percentile charateristics, but is mainly because of familiarity with the 3-18 range.
  17. jeffjerwin

    Who's the Orlanthi deity of...

    Her temples are often called Loom Houses...
  18. rsanford

    Before I buy 7th edition

    I have always understood "crunchy" to be the number of rules a game had but not necessarily the page count. I don't have 7th edition but I would have considered 6th edition to be light to medium crunch.
  19. Lysus

    Theyalan-centric history.

    While I personally wouldn't mind a campaign, I'd vastly prefer setting material. The most I generally want from a scenario is the setup, after which things are free to move as they will, dictated by the actions of the players and other movers and shakers.
  20. When tooling around on the spirit plane? I think so, but just checking. I don't know if this should go in the official questions thread or not. If so, I'll move it to there.
  21. klecser

    Before I buy 7th edition

    Page count doesn't make something crunchy. Execution does. Maybe we should clarify what we're talking about when we say "crunch." When gamers use "crunch" as a criticism, they are implying that a game runs slower when there are more mechanics. Right? That is the concern? How fast are our games? We prefer faster games not "bogged down" by mechanics, right? And less a resistance table, I'd say the game still runs faster than most role-playing systems out there. You may want faster. Great. Ditch what you don't want, right? None of the things you mention as "crunch" concerns make 7E run any slower in the hands of a quality Keeper. If someone's 7th games are running slower than their 6th games, that isn't mechanics doing that. That's Keeper execution and table management.
  22. ronin

    Before I buy 7th edition

    I’ll start this by saying I don’t have a ton of experience with previous editions, mainly a few scenarios at conventions. I really like 7th edition a lot, particularly a few of the things that were introduced in the new edition. If I have any of this wrong feel free to correct me. 1. Pushed rolls- I love this addition, it’s a way to give the player more rope to hang themselves with 2. Luck spends- another way to let the players hang themselves. Sure, they get to make a few skill checks successfully but when I get to hear the collective moan from the players when I ask for a group luck roll, can’t help but smile. 3. Degrees of success- having ordinary, hard, and extreme successes give you three levels to work with when giving out information. It also helps with the combat system , allowing the fight back option which moves combat along quicker. 4. Adjusting an investigator’s back story after an episode of insanity. To me this signifies an investigator’s life deteriorating while the player watches it happen. You have the liberty to change their history however best fits their story. 5. Chase rules- I’m probably in the minority but I like them. I used them when running the Escape from Innsmouth and they worked really well. I’ll admit I read them through a few times to make sure I had them down but once I did they were fairly easy to use. 6. Mythos tomes- using a mythos tome as a reference fits really well. I don’t know if this was in previous editions but I noticed the stats for tomes are different in 7th edition. I’m sure there are other things I’m forgetting, hopefully my information above is accurate. In addition to the list above the new edition’s books are awesome! I just received the news Masks campaign, can’t say enough about how sweet it is! I have many of the new books, all of them are pretty sweet. I started keeping for my group about 15 months ago, I’m very glad I went with the newest edition, highly recommended!
  23. VonKatzen

    Magical Fire and Accidental Arson

    Yes, in order to get to big proportions it would have to be a sustained flame or a really dry area - or a lot of it would probably disperse from water evaporation and so forth. However, starting a fire in an ancient/medieval city would probably be easier, since the timbers in buildings are already dry. Although some cities use quite a bit of stone the roofing is usually wood.
  24. This article gives us conclusive insight into how Mostali do parquetry (btw: no actual wombats involved, just years of training and plenty of roughage) #gloranthafuel https://www.gizmodo.com.au/2018/11/we-finally-know-how-wombats-produce-their-distinctly-cube-shaped-poop
  25. Yesterday
  26. jps

    What Cults do we want to see the most?

    Leafing through my GoG third edition supplement, I would say including a cursory treatment of other races' pantheons would be nice but an in-depth cover would be better left for dedicated supplements about Uz, Mostali, Aldryami, Kralori etc. For this GoG a full treatment about Orlanthi gods, Praxian gods, Hsunchen gods, Lunar gods, Solar gods, and malkionism (which would be a huge work already) would be great. Concerning obscure sub-cults (since gods in Glorantha are so many), having them covered in regional supplements is probably more reasonable.
  27. Joerg

    Who's the Orlanthi deity of...

    Ernalda (or/as Durev's wife Orane) really is the goddess for all kinds of textile work - spinning the threads, weaving them on the loom, sewing and embroidering the raw textiles into luscious garments.
  28. Joerg

    The History of New Pavis 1579-1610

    Strangely, when I look at the flint mines on Bornholm or the great salt mines of Dürrnberg or Hallstatt, I find evidence of well-nourished and well-off miners, and none of starved and sick slaves, in the burials. That's Bronze Age and early Iron Age. True, about half of the contemporary burials were burnt rather than body graves, destroying much of the evidence anthropologists can read from bone remains, but the burnt burials usually had the richer grave goods, which should be a point against malnutrition and mistreatment of the mine workers. There have been found no mass graves of malnutritioned bodies deformed by hard mining work anywhere in Europe prior to way more modern times. From what I have seen, most mining was done into the walls of the tunnels rather than on the floors, following the (more or less skewed) veins of ore in the rock. Again, this isn't the type of job you put disposable untrained folk that you don't mind being crushed when the rock layer above gives, if simply for the economic reason that getting the tunnel near the ore veins was a big ante up in man-hours and material that you didn't want to lose to ineptitude. Hauling out fallen dead rock rather than ore was a loss to the miners at all times. There were jobs that did not require much expertise, like crewing the treadmills, pushing or pulling carts full of ore or rock, and similar duties. Those were done by whoever was available - often the wives and children of the miners, and their husbandry like dogs, goats, donkeys or ponies. All of which would get eaten at the end of their terms of serviceability. Hew first, sort later? Hauling up all that dead rock for uncertain amounts of ore doesn't sound like a winning strategy. Sure, you could use mining as a penal or death camp, and get some money out of that. I don't have any data on who implemented this, and where. Usually prisoners were not given instruments to dig tunnels, possibly for their escape. They may have been put into sun-less oubliettes for long times, possibly the rests of their lives, but normally confinement was a penalty only given to people you expected to be released at some future point of time, or people too popular (or too closely related) to execute right away. Do you have chronologies for these kinds of activities? Like I said, the archaeological record north of the Alps for the Bronze Age appears to indicate a different situation, and likewise the establishment of German miners in early modern Age Norway etc. Georg Agricola's treatise on mining doesn't mention slave work or intentured work force, but it shows children and all manner of draft beasts. I am aware of slaves worked to their death e.g. in the first US gold rush east of the Rocky Mountains which saw lots of Native Americans enslaved and dying in the gold mines on their territories, or by totalitarian regimes in the 20th and 21st centuries (like the current Coltan mines in bandit-controlled parts of central Africa). The Western Pacific Railroad used up Chinese workers in tunnel building at similarly appalling rates as did Nazi Germany use up prisoners of war or civilian deportees to build those underground factories for the futile weapons of revenge. My own experiences in the industry were mostly above ground, concerned with separating processing the mineral destined for sale from unusable material. As for the history of mining, I did read some Roman sources (mostly concerning water-ways, but involving tunnels anyway) and of course Georg Agricola, and a bit about the migration of German miners to virgin territories in the early Modern Age. From what I learned, the underground work required a companionship otherwise only found in squads and platoons in the military. It is hard to instill such a spirit in disposable slaves. Dorasar had to renew all those alliances and concessions won by Pavis seven centuries earlier. He had been a trainee of Sarotar, the most heroic of the descendants of Sartar (in the words of Tarkalor, a contender for that acclamation) during his adventures in Esrolia, and IMO earlier than that in Pavis after news of the Dragonewts Dream event breaking the troll seals on the Rubble. Given the education as builders all dynastic heirs of Sartar apparently had to undergo, he would have been more than qualified to convince the Flintnail cult to cooperate. Some heroquesting lessons from Belintar's Holy Country may have been in the mix, too, possibly even a Tournament of the Masters of Luck and Death with a good minor victory and no critical loss to the winner.
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