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  2. GAZZA

    RQ3 Conversion

    Never thought of that - that's an excellent idea as well, cheers.
  3. GAZZA

    RQ3 Conversion

    That's really useful. Just one question - are the percentages there intended to be actual percentages, or percentages of the PC's corresponding skills? (I'm guessing the former, which is fine - if I want 245% dudes running around they are probably fine to stat up properly).
  4. Who claimed this, out of curiosity? "[Author Sandy Petersen] has left out the concept of a "war in heaven" in which the Great Old Ones battled and were defeated by the Elder Gods, supposed deities of good opposed to the cosmic evil of the Great Old Ones. This idea of a cosmic war is never found in Lovecraft's own works; more importantly, it vitiates some of the stark horror found in the original ideas." ~ Call of Cthulhu RPG, "What Was Left Out", all the way back in the 1st Edition, 1981. Not that Sandy had the last word on the matter, but that's been in every edition of CoC I've ever looked at, including the most recent 7th Ed, and he scores a valid point. In fact, I more or less paraphrased him earlier by invoking God with a fire extinguisher ready to save the day. Derleth has his fans, perhaps largely because he introduces hope where Lovecraft offered none. I did it myself when I was playing CoC as a teenager. I'd make different choices today. Different strokes and all that. !i!
  5. King of Sartar introduces the Feathered Horse Queens with a myth regarding the Pure Horse People versions of Ernalda an her sisters. Eneera Tor became the first FHQ in 1455. Here, a connection to Queen Bruvala of Esrolia is hinted, and 1455 is also the year in which the Shakers priestesses incarnated Sorana Tor into their High priestess. So, are these "historical" events simply an echo of the myth above (an example of synchronicity, without causal relationships between them), or are there some events or hidden meanings I am missing? Is the death of Erantha Gor in some way related to the above? Also, citing from Glorantha Sourcebook (or from the previous link), Isn't the wording a bit strange? I mean, she became Queen of Dragon Pass, hence she proved to be the incarnation of Sorana Tor? Also, how could she prove to be the incarnation of Sorana Tor if, during her life, someone else already was recognized as such? At first I thought that, maybe, "incarnation of Sorana Tor" is just a title, but isn't it odd in a world with real incarnations?
  6. I agree with the point you're trying to make, but to be entirely fair, Derleth's not that good of an example. His contributions to the mythos have always been a bit controversial precisely for not being "lovecraftian" enough and drawing too much from christian concepts.
  7. Firstly, lay-membership is very fluid. If you show up to worship, pay your clack and spent your magic point, you're a lay-member. Those who want to get more involved in the temple and aim for initiate status will be a lot more serious about their lay-membership, and it will be pretty obvious who those people are. It is therefore pretty easy to scrape together 150+ lay-members, and often a tribal ring will insist that the numbers, sacrifices, and payments be met for the sole purpose of keeping a temple and its blessings available. So think in those terms; a priest who wants to found a new temple should plan to get on the good side of their tribal ring, or find a place that is sacred to the deity where they can set up a myth-specific temple. Obviously things like sacred items/relics are important too. Most temples will have a consecrated space, and also substantial wardings, and perhaps a number of discorporate spirits or elementals in service to the deity operating to support the defenses. The temple may also earn enough to support some guards, but these will largely be dependent on how threatened the temple is. These defenses will become permanent fixtures, potentially supported by initiates who are "doing work for the temple for a season". Each associated cult will need its own sub-altar, but these serve the double benefit of providing income from associated cultists who come in. For example, an issaries priest can wander into an Orlanth temple and go and pray at the Orlanth Temple's Issaries votive statue alcove, and leave a donation, and meet their cult requirements that way. On the other hand, if an Orlanth initiate wants to obtain Issaries' Lock spell, he would need to join the associated cult when the Issaries priest next comes to perform a ceremony there. This sort of thing is handled as between games day-to-day business of the temple, governed by the Manage Household skill. The Issaries shrine at Apple Lane used to be maintained by Gringle Goodsell, before the Lunars, but I believe he was cleaned out after Starbrow's Rebellion in 1613. The fact that there are 3 initiates doesn't mean that there aren't other people around the area who don't benefit from Issaries worship who will drop in to do business in Apple Lane. Passing Issaries priests will be able to manage the shrine as they need it, and it is likely that there is at least one priest from one of the Colymar settlements who works at the larger temple, but travels to the shrine periodically, but doesn't live there. Back in RQ2, the possibility for people to rent space under a Create Neutral Ground spell that would allow them to set up a temporary worship space for their deity, then pack up and ship off when their time elapsed, typically later that afternoon. Presently the rules are not specific about this sort of thing. In the case of spirit cults, especially Praxian ones, the spirit will be tied not to a place, but to a sacred object, and the reverenced object will be carried about, and a new shrine set up wherever it and its shaman are. Divine relics may perform in a similar fashion, but often the place itself becomes enchanted by being touched by the deity as worship feedback. It benefits a deity to connect to the world, as it supports their power, much like farmers will plant an orchard, and come back seasonally to pick the fruit. There is no reason not to suppose that deities are not sustained by worship, and will return to be fed again periodically. If they stop being fed, they will signal their displeasure however.
  8. Not hostile at all, but that's often the impression caused by attempting to convey irony via the Internet. Mea culpa. But you take away what you bring to the conversation. Right on the money, though only one in particular, and I take exception to characterising it as juvenile! I personally don't think so, but that's exactly point I was making. The debate is frequent and widespread regarding "authentic" voice. As I actually did write above, I dunno -- can a man write believable female dialogue? Depends on the writer's talent. Depends on the writer's agenda and bias (if any). Depends on the reader. !i!
  9. Even still, I don't at all agree with the claim that theists can't write Lovecraftian stories and can only be knockoffs, more or less, because it's totally false. Derleth is the best example. Don't feel like you can't write or engage in cosmic horror without being an atheist. That's complete nonsense.
  10. I thought that at first to, but I don't think it was intended to be hostile. He went on to say constructive stuff afterward, and we were able to set aside our differences.
  11. Nice review, had to skip the adventure side of it as I may be playing in the future. I agree i think Chaosium have done such a marvellous job in visualising the Orlanthi culture in these new RQG supplements. The art and maps are superb, and really express the original RQ2 feel of the ancient Bronze Age culture, but gives much more again.
  12. Today
  13. This whole post sounds like a lot of unnecessary hostility towards religion and faith and juvenile jabbing at other forum members, but maybe I'm misunderstanding you. In your own example you seem to think that, for example, men can't write female dialogue. By the same token, how can an atheist write believably about theism? If I remember right the end of The Stand is handled by divine intervention with the help by a prophet of God, but I'm not 100% sure. I never got the sense King hated Christianity or any religion really, just like I don't think he believes every parent in Maine is an abusive alcoholic. This is completely wrong. August Derleth was a major contributor to the Lovecraft mythos as we know it, and he was a devout Catholic. Many writers of mythos-related works had varying religious beliefs, and Lovecraft still encouraged them to write. He was an atheist himself but never expressed hatred of theists and religion. Nothing about Call of Cthulhu or playing in the Lovecraft mythos necessitates the explicit falsification of any real-world religious beliefs. Unless you try to be an absolutely rigid Lovecraft "purist" and ignore everything else anyone ever wrote for his setting, nothing about it means that being theistic means you can't write cosmic horror, or that writing cosmic horror requires that you invalidate any religious beliefs. To me, even claiming that just sounds "edgy" and pretentious, and it just isn't true unless, again, you ignore absolutely everything not written by Lovecraft, and then you're left with a mythos that doesn't even exist, isn't defined, and is just a collection of separate horror stories.
  14. Praxians have a good idea about who controls what territory with how many warriors. They are a raiding culture, and this is their livelihood. Praxians will have solid intel on the strength of the Lunars if they are near them, and this will be updated any time they follow a caravan into a Lunar settlement as guards. It's part of their raider culture mindset, just like a robber and every security guard will case every shop they walk into. Given that prophecies don't always quite mean what they say, there would need to be a shift in the balance of power, (most likely the Dragonrise), that would tip the balance imo. If the dragonrise was part of the White Bull Prophecy then it would be a lay down misere.
  15. ... some knowledge better remain forgotten.... .. yet I can't help but think, couldn't this be, in fact, helpful. So many sought it after all? The legendary, The infamous, The Necronomicon... is on sale now! 😮 https://www.drivethrufiction.com/product/131454/The-Necronomicon?src=DTRPGTwitterDotD
  16. Whatever his beliefs, King apparently has prophetic powers: Thing is, what scares him encourages me and vice-versa. Would he be willing to discuss worldviews over No. 5 Combo meals? Dunno. He might telekinetically skewer me with sporks (since plastic drinking straws are banned). And we'd have to be in the drive-through lane. Yikes! Carrie's mom got off easy!
  17. Two quick questions about squires... 1) Do squires fight when there is a combat or do they stay apart? 2) Is it possible to change a squire for another one? I have a PK who has a 14 y.o. squire, but in two years his nephew is going to be 14 and wants him to be his squire...
  18. metcalph

    Kasda

    My impression is that because Anirestyu lost the war, historians felt free to libel him. Except that the Ralians have some memories of the Dara Happan incursion (Arkat the Liberator tract Guide p386). The tract is a bit confusing because Arkat is called Gbaji and the Liberator is Talor. Arkat leaves the Seshnegi and the "king was glad to see him go". The King is apparently Gerlant Flamesword although this is an anchronism since Gerlant didn't become King until much later. Arkat goes to Ralios for nine years where he incites the lords there against the Seshnegi (Likstrandos has eight years between the death of Gachamagacan in Tanisor) and Arkat's death at the hands of Palangio in 418 ST). Now for the critical passage. Arkat returns with Harmast in 422 ST in Arkhome in Seshnela. Vangath Hill (in Delela) is fought in 424 ST. The siege of Kasda is around 425 ST Arkat is defeated at Kartolin in 428 ST and then considers going through Slontos. So my interpretation is that the Dara Happa had an army in Ralios after Arkat was killed. Palangio had been its leader but he was sent away to Slontos. When Arkat returned and won the battle of Vanganth Hill, Anirestyu led in a new army that besieged Kasda. Eventually Anirestyu was forced to withdraw before 428 ST (otherwise he would have been cut off at the Battle of Kartolin). Thereafter he adopted a view that War solves Nothing which governed his actions for the remainder of his reign. Perhaps like Marshal Petain. The Glorantha Sourcebook does have reliefs in Boldhome that portray the Lunar Empire similarly. I think the artistic intent here (in Kasda and Boldhome) is like the Bayeux Tapestry which is mostly about Harold Godwinson rather than William the Conqueror - a mighty person we defeated..
  19. You might be a bit too focused on the rules. They exact requirements will of course vary from cult to cult for one thing. More importantly they will vary with the vision of the Glorantha you are in. You have learn those rules, not so much the rule book rules, if that makes any sense. #1) The answer is to ask your gamemaster. I've never had a player ask to found a temple before, but you clearly need to have people worshiping there, or you really just founded a very large shrine with extra seating. So I would have the player go somewhere clearly lacking in said cult, have an adventure of some type (likely a fairly long and epic one), and show the people the worth of his chosen god, defeat/trick/overcome their foes/problems/anxieties, and then actually go through the process of physically founding the temple. Ideally this happens somewhat organically through play. #2) Same answer -- ask your game master how his Glorantha varies. But in mine that would be a very easy task in comparison, although as always, a shrine on the site of a great victory for that deity over *something* is 1000% better than some random statue to Zorak Zoran in the middle of a road for no reason.
  20. Is this evident in all his work? I mean, I love Black Sabbath and Tool, but in general don't really love drug fueled art...
  21. I like the specificity here, @soltakss! If I may be so bold, however... this might be better placed in the more-official Q&A thread. This thread is a lot more "discussion-y" and we all feel free to chime in with various opinions & such. I just wrote such a discussion-y opinion-piece ... and then didn't post it, as I realized I was in Chaosium's Q&A thread!
  22. How to Found a Minor Temple? Let me quote some background first before I pose my two questions, if only to show that I have indeed read the rules: Campaign background of the question: Note that for Issaries, temples are markets, so the ambition to found one’s own minor temple seems a logical long term goal for any developed Issaries character who has a fixed base away from an existing temple. Rules background: p.282 of the rules [Roleplaying in Glorantha] says somewhat casually that a Priest can become a Chief Priest by qualifying to Found Own Temple of the cult. The qualifications as printed are not impossibly demanding for a highly developed player character qualified as a priest: 15 rune Points and 90% ability in three cult knowledge skills. And “often” the permission of the High Priest “which is easy to get if the Priest goes somewhere else to set up the temple, and has sufficient funds to do so. “ I have found one additional item, essentially a change not included in Rune Fixes, in the Well of Daliath Q&A from Jason Durall: “Qualify to Found Own Temple of the Cult: To do this, a Rune Priest or Rune Lord must have the support of at least 150 lay members and initiates that will follow them to the new temple. This often requires the permission of the High Priest, which is easy to get if the Priest goes somewhere else to set up the temple, and has sufficient funds to do so. “ https://wellofdaliath.chaosium.com/home/catalogue/publishers/chaosium/runequest-roleplaying-in-glorantha-players-book-print/cha4028-runequest-roleplaying-in-glorantha-qa-by-chapter/cha4028-runequest-roleplaying-in-glorantha-chapter-13-rune-cults/ Question 1: It seems to me that the requirements as written in the book are too easy, though the Q&A change primes the GM to set a barrier and avoid the issue. A PC may object that the temple is to be founded in a place where 150 lay members and initiates already live, at least within half a day’s journey. But what does founding a minor temple mean in practical game terms? A temple gives bonuses for worship rolls, and it seems inconsistent with other parts of the same book for it to only be a cabin with a carved image in one corner or a plot of land with a “Temple” sign tacked up. Why inconsistent? A. If you want to replenish rune points in any unofficial plot of ground, you have to use the Sanctify rune spell (p.338) and presumably if you want to use more than 15 minutes of Ceremony to improve your odds of success that Sanctify will have to be combined with Extension (p.328 ). Using this method we are already up to a cost of 5 rune points just to accommodate one Holy Season. B. Given the explanation in Rune Fixes 2, that long-term Extensions tie up both the caster’s rune points and the character’s other activities, it doesn’t seem practical to say that the priest just casts Sanctify and Extension frequently to make a minor temple. Why? Because while that Extension is in effect the priest won’t be able to perform other useful rune spells to benefit the community, won’t be able to teach spirit spells, and also won’t be able to regain his own rune points. Also, if you do that spell combination on one Holy Day or in Sacred Time, you’re very low on rune points until you can visit another temple. When you make that trip to the other temple, your store is no longer a temple. The local initiates may thank you for leading worship. But you can’t support yourself as a priest this way and I question whether you have a temple as indicated in the rules. C. Therefore a temple founded on those terms (just casting Sanctify and Extension) can’t possibly operate in the long term and can’t benefit its community with only one priest or god talker, as the two examples in Apple Lane operate. My conclusion: To have a Minor Temple as a permanently or at least long-term sanctified area must require more, something really special, much more than just a single priest hanging out his or her shingle. So Question #1: what should the ambitious priest expect and what should the gamesmaster require for actually setting up a minor temple that can satisfy the standard and basic worship bonus functions indicated on pp. 315-316? Question 2: While I ask that about founding a temple, the same question applies to setting up a shrine, which gives no worship bonuses but evidently does allow rune point replenishment and even in some places possibly sacrificing POW and gaining one rune spell. Here we do have an example, for a shrine to a spirit rather than a god, p. 378. That example requires a “focus of power” (a relic?), a shaman, and at least ten initiates who will guarantee sacrifice of 1 magic point each every week. But what would a god require to set up and maintain a shrine? I only count three Issaries initiates in and around Apple Lane, but there is an Issaries shrine there. It must not take the same maintenance as a spirit shrine . Presumably a god’s shrine is more durable and not so high-maintenance. And in discussion I see talk about nomad shrines in Prax, which would not have a population every week but only seasonally.
  23. I'm far more intimidated by his cocaine-fueled brickwork. But, yeah, I understand how wading hip-deep in someone else's agenda can spoil the enjoyment. By contrast, I recently finished watching a VERY good television show (FX's Legion) wherein the final season several characters were espousing personal views that I found highly objectionable, and it was nagging at my enjoyment of the show...until I realised that they were voices in a chorus of other characters that made the whole show work, and didn't represent an overarching agenda meant to alienate anyone watching it, much less me personally. Frankly, it was believable writing, and I could appreciate it without identifying with it. I loved me some C.S. Lewis when I was a young reader. And I recall my surprise when I discovered the Christian allegory in most of his writing. I mean, it was right there in front of my face, but subtle enough to not get in the way. Never succeeded in converting me, either. Just darned good storytelling. A good story is a good story. It doesn't have to affirm one's personal beliefs and desires to have a positive impact. !i!
  24. M Helsdon

    Kasda

    Yes, I read the description of the ruined relief found in Delela, but I can't quite square that with the description of Anirestyu's rule in Fortunate Succession. As this was the time of Arkat's campaign in Ralios, I am wondering if the relief was from elsewhere and was plunder brought back from the wars (seems improbable) or if it is a relic of a Dara Happan/Bright Empire campaign in Ralios - which doesn't seem to fit the text in FS... I may be reading too much into the fact that the illustration is from an Assyrian palace (probably at Nineveh) but usually that sort of art isn't left as a commemoration, but appears as palace wall propaganda. If it is a commemoration of the Bright Empire campaign against Arkat in Ralios, then Kasda must have been a pro-Arkat city. [I am attempting to find all the details I can about Arkat in Ralios, and this 'data point' doesn't seem to quite fit the narrative.]
  25. Then it's a race to print! But you're right: He who holds title to the license holds the fate of worlds in his hands. !i!
  26. I meant because I was thinking about reading his work, and I still will. I did not intend my comment to be a generalization, but rather to be specifically about Mr. King. Edit: There is also the point to be made that the keyphrase is "hates Christianity". That would be a generalization which I wouldn't want to put up with. You can hate individuals, but while I might dislike L. Ron Hubbard, I'm not going to then put a blanket ban on all who tell me they believe in Scientology. I certainly dislike some atheists I have known, but I don't hate atheism. There is a difference between discrimination, brainwashing, or unfounded hatred; and a dislike of specific people who you know to be against you or what you hold true. Then there is the truth of not judging even individuals because you don't know what their life is like or how they arrived at the conclusions they did. My personal philosophy on the matter would be to live and let live, and my comment was founded in frustration toward prejudice. Yet according to the other comments and King's own statements, he does not have a blind hatred of all Christians, which makes this all pretty much moot points. Just wanted to get it out:) Haha, most people don't even know what that is:) But no, when I write I try not to have a political or religious agenda to get across, at least in most of my work. And yes, quite sound guidelines, thank you! I may use it as a test of my own works to see if they stand.
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