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  2. I would love to see some Tékumel stuff for HeroQuest or the SRD but I wonder about the licensing issues.
  3. You're without a doubt right, I'm very tempted to instead of making maps like these to give the players something like the Tabula Peutingeriana. Which, itself, would have been rare. My understanding is that many "maps" would have been little more than an itinerary like list of major locations with rough subjective distances.
  4. Brootse

    Nature of Metals

    Chinese used two-handed bronze swords. From The Money Tree adventure: "Gregor Gougepoor owns the water-powered mill which grinds the district's grain. It is the reason that Greenbrass is as large as it is, and the oxidized brass fittings of the mill long ago gave the hamlet its name."
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  7. @Morien@Hzark10 How's it look now? I also added another map I did a while back for 485. I updated the Roman Road network I pulled from to reflect your comments about the loop near Hadrian's wall. I added Ireland as it was in 531 with Dal Riada being as it is in the early part of the GPC. I noticed the Irish kingdoms line up really well with current Irish territorial subdivisions (counties?).
  8. IMO that's sort of where Sandy was going with his Tekumel implementation of RQ Sorcery (note, this is DISTINCT from Sandy's Sorcery rules). RQ3 presented less "spells" than generic spell effects. They were utterly banal and somehow managed to make spell casting a dull affair. Sandy's Tekumel enlivened RQ3 sorcery by using it only as a magical platform from which he built MAR Barker-flavored incantations. Compare RQ3: to Sandy's Tekumel: (Which sounds intrinsically more fun?) Note the latter is a straight 5mp to cast, then manipulatable as to range, etc.. To your point, and to Crel's a lot of these spells were either not really boostable in the generic, flavorless RQ3 way but actually gave different effects when different intensities were reached. As glorified versions of the cantrips that Crel was talking about, I saw them as more 'assemblages of effects' whose results were more than the sum of their parts in a straight-sort-of-magics-as-physics approach, but likewise were far less flexible. And yeah, they were in many cases crazy overpowered. But one has to ask oneself if 'balance' as a metagame structure isn't the polar opposite of realism, in some ways. As a Gm that prefers sandbox over dramatic narrative, my concern about balance has more to do with looking at the societies as competitive entities: if a person in society A can do 1d3 damage with 1mp, and someone in society B can do 2d6 with that same 1mp without some countervailing cost/constraint, how is it that society B isn't running amok? But that's probably another thread.
  9. Today
  10. Look at this. I wish I knew French. Now this is packaging campaigns. Why is it so different when compared to the English edition? https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0gT7HyFN7oA
  11. Armor of course would not be worn in social occasions. We have examples in Le Morte, in particular Balin's case, where the knight goes to get his horse and armor as he is leaving court. As for the sword, I would let that be a function of the situation and the Lord's suspicious. Arthur would likely allow people to wear their swords, but a more suspicious Lord might insist on his guests disarming at the door. Eating knives would always be OK, and perhaps even fighting daggers to show some status. For feasts, I would imagine that the swords would be left off, since they would get in the way of sitting and dancing (and tripping servants or knocking against other people). But if you are standing at a court occasion as the lord is interviewing people or holding court, maybe you'd wear your sword them to show your status as a nobleman. But see above re: suspicious lords.
  12. Oh absolutely. In RQG it says explicitly: "This chapter provides a bare bones overview of sorcery, a subject to be expanded upon in future RuneQuest supplements." Bare bones, unfortunately, implies that this is the actual structure (presented in simple form) to be elaborated on later. "Placeholder" would give me more optimism that the future rules might be significantly revamped. It's not impossible (IIRC for example the 2-weapon rules evolved into something significantly different in the errata thread(s)), in fact, I sincerely hope that they DON'T feel too much of a need to hew to the structure so far presented.
  13. Not yet annotated: Carmanian cataphract.
  14. I don't think you'll need many fingers to count who actively dislike Chaosium and their games across various forums. Even people who don't care for company or products have to struggle to find much to grog about. The fans are generally properly - as opposed to obnoxiously - fanatic. All are aware of the alternative to the ChaosiMoon-merger, and no one wanted that. Chaosium just needs to learn that a) the internet never forgets and b) how to deal with gamers with a grudge - factual ones or not . Until they do, grudges will be an unpleasant element in any discusssions they cannot moderate to their liking. But what kind of site do we want for BRP Central? I vote for a place where we can discuss d100-games, using the occasional adult choice of wording without having to look over our shoulder in fear of an approaching banhammer. Issues will inevitably arise when you expect people to behave like adults on the internet. We will have to live with that.
  15. The Hunter occupation seems to lack the Survival skill. Most of the suggested cults would have it, but not Orlanth or Yelm (Grazelands). Is this on purpose, or should all Hunters have it?
  16. Joerg

    Nature of Metals

    Dream Dragon carcasses fade away as a whole, whether leather, meat or bones. I think this is still canon. But yes, the dragonewts use True Dragon bone for their advanced weaponry as far as I know. It's not like it is a rare commodity in Dragon Pass, with the Dragonspine dividing the region. What is rare is the abiltiy to refine it through song (and probably also dance and irrational behavior). The EWF humans may have copied that from the dragonewts, but this knowledge was lost in 1042 in the mass utuma, alongside the full ability to understand and speak Auld Wyrmish.
  17. Joerg

    Nature of Metals

    So... Buggering might actually be involved... Dara Happan theology is quite obsessed with the stories of the three brothers (let's call them Lodril, Yelm, and Dayzatar) lining up below the Sky Dome early on, but then Lodril taking a dive down and Dayzatar removing himself upwards. There are a number of celestial metals. Gold, of course, for the sun. Silver, for the stars, and for the entities of the Celestial Court (including Uleria after whom that Gloranthan metallurgist named it), and Tin. Now, when Lodril dove down, he apparently took Tin with him. And he infused the formerly at best moderately warm body of the earth cube with his hot molten... seed. Because there is another story, untold by the Dara Happans if they can avoid it, and that is about Aether ejaculating into Gata. Apparently, that union took a whole lot of time. According to Dara Happan pre-Dawn reckoning, Lodril's descent occurred in10,000 YS. That's quite slow sex. The Pregnancy that followed took about 20,000 years (YS), with Umath's birth and the dislocation of the Sky Dome caused by it happening around 30,000 YS. (Those numbers are taken from Guide to Glorantha p.125, those in Glorious ReAscent of Yelm lack the birth of Umatum) I was talking about Brass before. Have you ever noticed that the Mostali don't have a Bronze caste? Their master alloyist and masters of heat are the Brass caste. Brass is the metal of Lodril. Tin in Copper. And IMO the magic spilled over, and created Umath. So maybe Tin is the spent remnants of Aether's hot seed. The white spots on the dress/skirt/cloak/blanket of Gata. Possibly glows under darklight. Nitpick: not that there are molecules involved in Bronze. This is one core point in which I disagree with the presentation of the metals of Glorantha. A lot of the "bronze" deposits are actually brass deposits, bones (or congealed remnants of liqufied bones) of the volcano/mountain gods which suffered a lot, among others by their storm cousins with similar bone structure. The volcanic children of Lodril all are of Lodril's Sky and of Earth. Lodril himself has taken on much Earth. Only Orlanth is the Mountain Storm. The rest of the storm gods raged at and battered against the mountains, with Stormwalk being one of the most mutilated victims. But also Darkness (Argan Argar) came and fought the volcanoes, and so did the sorcerers and their water allies in the northwest. Brass is found in mountainous regions. Yes, if the Gods War had a few battles fought with RuneQuest melee rules, then there would be heaps of hacked off storm god limbs strewn across the world, supplying vast amounts of bronze, too. In addition to all that brass. In my opinion, "storm bronze" should be restricted to bits of metal which have growth lines. This is a layered, effectively damascened bronze, a structure only growth can create. Not even the Mostali have been shown to have recreated that. This "storm bronze" can do things terrestrial bronze cannot, like being hammered into huge, two-handed sword blades which should be impossible for ancient terrestrial bronze working. Then there is brass, good for mass-produced cast metal objects. This behaves more or less exactly like terrestrial bronze, and not at all like the glittery terrestrial brass which contains no tin at all but about a third zinc (a metal unknown to the Gloranthans). Sure. Some of Aether's hot seed may be re-directed into a different lap, creating a deity of differently mixed elemental ancestry. Sounds like something a Eurmal quest might be about. That story fails to make sense to me. Two of Umath's sons married - Orlanth and Storm Bull - and both married an Earth Goddess. The rest didn't exactly marry their spouses. Did Humakt have any spouses or indeed lays other than that Brithini chick that mothered Arkat? The Triolini matings of the Vadrudi resulted in western humans and in the air-breathing lesser merfolk. And as for Ragnaglar... Again, this leaves me confused. Tin is the metal of the (spent?) Sky. Why should it suddenly have Storm attributes? Sure, I assume that Umath took all that magic of Aether into himself, and then he also divested of it generously in his matings with e.g. Mikyh the Beast Mother (Dragon), or with Kero Fin, Larnste's child from Gata (and hence his half-sister). We have no clear information who could have been the mother of Vadrus, Humakt or Ragnaglar. Heortling Mythology has Kero Fin as mother of the Storm Gods except for Kolat, but that makes the Storm Bull son of Mikyh story somewhat weird. It also puts way too much focus on Dragon Pass and not nearly enough on Top of the World mountain. But then, it is Heortling Mythology, not Orlanthi Mythology. Pewter is Sky and Darkness. Argan Argar, or his mother Xentha. Or perhaps they are Sky and Shadow, as neither of these two seems to be a Cold deity. Electrum (50% each silver and gold) is the terrestrial world's first coin alloy, from the middle Iron Age. (Not necessarily the first monetary exchange token, though.) Red (18 carat) Gold and Yellow (18 carat) Gold are similar, with 75% gold and 18% and 7% of the other two, respectively (18% copper for red gold, 18% silver for yellow gold). (White gold uses nickel, and platinum coating, and is not available in ancient technology, regardless of the Lord Foul novels.) Gods' bones are metallic. Dragons are in some sense peculiarly shaped gods. Why shouldn't their bones be metallic, or have the potential to have a quasi-metal made from them? Second Age Glorantha is in no way canonical, but I find the notion of "sung dragonbone" interesting enough to consider it for a weird outlier for Gloranthan metallurgy. Not that Berthalor, the Seshnegi author of the Metals of the Gods treatise, would have been exposed to any sung dragonbone. The Klanth is a (wooden?) club with obsidian, yes. But the dragonewt (samurai) great-sword, the Korff, is explicitely made of dragonbone, as is the sword-breaker Gami (also resembling well-loved Eastern martial arts weaponry). Humans don't produce either korff or gami, but the more primitive klanth is a ritual weapon of the Orlanthi, and features in the Aroka quest. Same here. I haven't found any positive evidence that copper or bronze gain that signature bluish green patina we love in copper roofs across European buildings, or indeed the patina of the Nebra Disk (after conservators had their way with the item dug out). But Gloranthan air is oxygen - the sharp-maker. The question is rather whether Gloranthan air has the equivalen of nitrogen, an inert substance that taken for itself would smother breath rather than sustain it. Good question. Iron was made without the direct participation of Mostal, but from the concerted efforts of all eight (types of) ancestral mostali. The Iron Crucible was the first attempt at mass production of Mostali. Iron Mostali aren't true mostali, but closer to other dwarven constructs in their mythical history. They make up the ninth caste. Mostal was in disrepair at the time, and Death had probably been released. The Sword Story has the original Sword (or a good copy) given to the mostali, who re-shaped it into an axe. This means that the mostali had Death in their smithy around that time, and may have used it (or copies of it) to make their new ninth caste.
  18. The thing is... a robber knight ought to not have any. Not if he is a true villain rather than an antihero. And his men are likely likewise. If the PKs are shouting insults at the castle, but don't have the strength to take it, why would the bandits turn against their leader? Better to sit tight and watch the PKs and their army starve and weaken. And then boys, we will kill every last one of them and loot the bodies! Good days will be here again! How much riskier to hope that you can just sneak away without being caught? And even if you manage to flee, will you get to have as sweet a gig as this one was, until those dang heroes stuck their nose into it? EDIT: And if the PKs have a large enough an army to make an assault possible, then they probably have enough men that sneaking away is risky, too. Cornered rats and all that.
  19. Our group is still in the Uther period - soon to be Anarchy - and I’ve encountered a speed bump in the form of what level of armament and armor is permissible in the various Courts? I assume when you are in your Lord’s Court - as you are a trusted member of his entourage - wearing your sword is always acceptable as it represents being ever ready to defend your Lord. Does the same apply when you visit the King’s Court? What about the times you are sent to the Courts outside Logres, like going to Malahaut or Estregales? Specifically, my PK’s are having to travel to Cumbria to handle a situation regarding the extended family of one of the players wives - and they are all trying to figure out where and how to secret the most weapons possible to make sure they are never unarmed and unarmored. It is a carryover from Pathfinder and such that they feel this paranoia, and discussions about Hospitality always circles back to the Night of Long Knives, so it got me wondering just how acceptable is it to wear your armor and weapons outside your home Court?
  20. Brootse

    Nature of Metals

    I have a vague recollection that dragonbone (from Dream Dragons) disappers after some years. Is it still canon? Or do the dragonewts use True Dragon bone?
  21. Thanks again to both Morien (for which book to look in) and to Atgxtg for good ideas. I'm thinking that if the PKs are smart they will taunt his honor to the point where his men start going "is he really as strong as he says he is". Most times, a bully is a coward at heart, so if the PKs can kill enough of his people while taunting his honor, they may be able to cause the robber baron's own men to start deserting. The points about time and money will be fun to watch.
  22. I have seen lists of adventures by book, as well as a suggested year-by-year list. Can't remember what thread it was, though.
  23. Thanks for the assist! I wonder if someone has compiled an index of what's where for KAP?
  24. The mummy has taken a dirt nap for ages. The vampire has an active lifestyle. No telling how many times s/he has shimmied into a crawlspace after a night painting the town red, had people shoot, stab, bite, punch and grab at him/her, ran full clip through a blackberry thicket to get away from a group of angry dogs, jumped headfirst into a bin of drying garlic after a late night meetup with the farmer's daughter, been showered with a font of holy water, etc. The vampire in Stoker and many things that come after it I interpret as having some sort of mojo that tricks people into seeing a young, virile maneater. It's all carny tricks.
  25. My (less useful) tip, if you have a whole bunch of RQ/HQ PDFs and Acrobat Pro: make an index and search whatever names are brought up. It's often illuminating because, for instance, a name might have 1 hit in the Glorantha Sourcebook, demonstrating that book's little problem with gratuitous name-dropping. Other times you get some interesting hits all over the place, and you can see how something is used, in practice, in, say, Sartar Companion or something. And yet other times you mostly get hits in the "scholar" sections of the library (i.e. the "translated" Stafford Library books), in which case I often ignore it as "only for the advanced Gloranthaphiles". It's still fun to do most of the times. For instance, @Joerg just mentioned Annilla, which I don't know at all, and I find this bit in GtG1 (p.97) where she's responsible (at least according to the Uz) for the ocean tides of Glorantha. That's kind of cool. You can drop that in an NPC dialogue in a game.
  26. But then again you have ancient, dried up mummies with more hair than I have. It depends on the vampire lore I guess. Some vampires, like in Stoker's Dracula, retain their youthful looks after dining on blood. In some myths, vampires (shroud eaters) are just rotting, bloated corpses who haunt their living family members. But the pics I posted are creepier than Fenalik, don't you agree?
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