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  2. @Redmoongodess Yeah I'm familiar with the Samuel Haight stuff. I'm not a fan of metaplots in general, but they're not innately bad, and as I've noted before at some point you have to pick a starting time. Would you raise the same objection to the God Learners and the EWF? To Arkat and Gbaji? Presumably not because they're in the past, right? Well, if you go with the new 1625+ timeline for RQG then so is the liberation of Sartar - and honestly, I don't think that's innately awful. (The main reason I set my campaign to start in 1615 was because I think The Cradle is an awesome scenario and I want to run my players through it). Plus, Argrath/Kallyr/Harrek are far more interesting and well rounded NPCs than Samuel Haight ever was. I mean don't get me wrong, I'd love to see supplements that supported a game set in the West (I suspect sorcery will need to be a lot more fleshed out than RQG has at the moment for that to be feasible), or with PC Lunars. I presume that as long as RQG proves reasonably profitable we'll eventually get that, and in the interim I assume @Nick Brooke and others will continue to produce quality work on their web sites - fan material, sure, but that's no bad thing if it's high quality. I don't see Chaosium moving in a "Argrath and His Amazing Friends" direction, personally - YGMV has been around for a long time, after all.
  3. @Redmoongodess Yeah I'm familiar with the Samuel Haight stuff. I'm not a fan of metaplots in general, but they're not innately bad, and as I've noted before at some point you have to pick a starting time. Would you raise the same objection to the God Learners and the EWF? To Arkat and Gbaji? Presumably not because they're in the past, right? Well, if you go with the new 1625+ timeline for RQG then so is the liberation of Sartar - and honestly, I don't think that's innately awful. (The main reason I set my campaign to start in 1615 was because I think The Cradle is an awesome scenario and I want to run my players through it). Plus, Argrath/Kallyr/Harrek are far more interesting and well rounded NPCs than Samuel Haight ever was. I mean don't get me wrong, I'd love to see supplements that supported a game set in the West (I suspect sorcery will need to be a lot more fleshed out than RQG has at the moment for that to be feasible), or with PC Lunars. I presume that as long as RQG proves reasonably profitable we'll eventually get that, and in the interim I assume @Nick Brooke and others will continue to produce quality work on their web sites - fan material, sure, but that's no bad thing if it's high quality. I don't see Chaosium moving in a "Argrath and His Amazing Friends" direction, personally - YGMV has been around for a long time, after all.
  4. @Redmoongodess Yeah I'm familiar with the Samuel Haight stuff. I'm not a fan of metaplots in general, but they're not innately bad, and as I've noted before at some point you have to pick a starting time. Would you raise the same objection to the God Learners and the EWF? To Arkat and Gbaji? Presumably not because they're in the past, right? Well, if you go with the new 1625+ timeline for RQG then so is the liberation of Sartar - and honestly, I don't think that's innately awful. (The main reason I set my campaign to start in 1615 was because I think The Cradle is an awesome scenario and I want to run my players through it). Plus, Argrath/Kallyr/Harrek are far more interesting and well rounded NPCs than Samuel Haight ever was. I mean don't get me wrong, I'd love to see supplements that supported a game set in the West (I suspect sorcery will need to be a lot more fleshed out than RQG has at the moment for that to be feasible), or with PC Lunars. I presume that as long as RQG proves reasonably profitable we'll eventually get that, and in the interim I assume @Nick Brooke and others will continue to produce quality work on their web sites - fan material, sure, but that's no bad thing if it's high quality. I don't see Chaosium moving in a "Argrath and His Amazing Friends" direction, personally - YGMV has been around for a long time, after all.
  5. Yes, my impression too. It was my impression, and I discussed mysticism with Greg quite a lot at one point, was that Greg took mysticism very seriously, had read a great deal of it, and was very sympathetic to it. He also felt that many/most people known as mystics were not really doing mysticism, or were failing badly at it, both in Glorantha and in real life - and that the moral dangers of using mysticism to justify your actions was very real. The treatment of Illumination in Glorantha is intended to show this danger, but it is not intended to be a simplistic, one-sided, thing either. The story of how Greg's idea of Illumination was based on his personal experience of some people associated with the Berkeley household of Marion Zimmer Bradley and her husband Walter Breen has been told a few times. Greg and some of his friends (I believe Steve Perrin?) attended social gatherings there, and Bradley was a co-founder of the Society for Creative Anachronism, which is so central to early RuneQuest, and a major part of the local pagan community. Bradley and Breen were involved in practices from the Western Esoteric traditions that could be regarded as mystic, and having other things in common with Nysalor, such as symbolism of light and freedom - for example, Rosicrucianism, the teachings of Dion Fortune, and Aleister Crowleys OTO. They were also people who are now regarded as deeply corrupted with unpleasant secrets - Breen was a known child abuser even at the time, and it is very likely Greg would have heard about it at some point (it was certainly well known in Californian science fiction fandom in the 1960s), Bradley became publicly known as one after her death. It is not hard to see how the image of the corrupt mystic Nysalor could have arisen from that situation. But my impression was that Greg also was a keen student of texts such as the yoga sutras of Patanjali, which at one time he said was core to understanding Gloranthan mysticism, and took them very seriously. And it is worth remembering that the Bhavagad Gita is literally a dialogue with Krishna about the moral doubts of Arjuna, after which Arjuna engages in a war in which he kills hundreds, thousands, of people. The idea that mystics can be responsible for huge stacks of corpse did not start with Greg. Greg did not at all draw a strict line between fiction and games, and the real and profound. I think that great spiritual truths can be expressed and explored through fiction and games was something that he felt deeply and that was the reason why he lived the life he did. In some Lunar texts, such as the Life of Sedenya published in Rule One Magazine, we find the instructions that The earliest document I have from Greg about the deeper Lunar mythology was a few pages that Greg handed out to some people attending the first Australian RuneQuest Con (labelled Moon Myths #1, if anyone else still has it). Greg began it with that rule, the First rule of the Goddess, and obeying that rule the first page was autobiographical from the point of view of Greg Stafford. He describes his own first memory, 'kindling' and 'sevening'. In short, Greg describes himself as 'Illuminated' and talks about the guidance of the Goddess in his life, as well as references to his shamanic practice. Thats not to say that Greg may not have, especially at other points in his life, felt similar deep connections to other philosophies, including the Orlanthi. But he certainly felt a deep connection to the Lunar way and its underlying ideas, even while acknowledging its 'dark side'.
  6. And auto-wins any tournament he participates in, which can be a massive annoyance. Fighting for second place isn't a lot of fun. (I also massively dislike how nothing that makes Lancelot so perfect is earned. Apparently great knights are born, not made, and Lancelot just had the maximum possible amount of the Knight gene.)
  7. Most of what Lancelot does is small-scale adventure stuff, though his relationship with Guenevere does drive the collapse of the Kingdom. But there's a long period where basically the PCs can run around having adventures and the NPCs are off having adventures and no one gets overshadowed. He only really drives the plot at the end, where the country blows up after the Grail Quest. In fact, he spends so much time adventuring, it's really easy to set up 'Sir Lancelot is off in York, fighting strangely identical knights, and only you can do the plot thing, as all the Round Table Knights are off adventuring. As compared to Argath, who increasingly dominates everything in Dragon Pass. (Though if your campaign is outside the DP area, Argath could just as well be Mr. Potato-Head Reborn.)
  8. It's an objective fact of the world (I think it's an objective fact?) that a little Chaos is necessary for the world to continue existing (the whole point of the Chaosium). Now, it might be argued that the best way to maintain the balance is to constantly fight tooth and nail against it and all pretend that this isn't the case, but from a philosophical standpoint, the lunars are right in seeing Chaos as a necessary part of the world. I personally can't see any reasonable reading that makes Argrath's ritual of the net an "Oops!" moment rather than a deliberate act, but to each their own.
  9. Dragon Pass and Prax especially have a Western feel to them. With the ducks and all, we could fix Dragon Pass as California and Prax as the surrounding desert. Dragon Pass belongs to the Dragons, who represent Zen. The Orlanthi are settlers and the Lunars are invaders. Holy Country, where the Orlanthi come from, should be New Orleans. The golddiggers who settled California belong to that strain. It's a slave-owning feudal society, basically Catholic. The Pharaoh is the Pope. Peloria should be New England. Yelm worshippers are Puritans, so Protestants. Lunarism is what you have in Hollywood. Tarsh is Los Angeles. There's a dialectic between old and new. Eventually the dragons eat everyone up. ... Such an interesting conversation I have to jump in. I never played in Glorantha but did own the Finnish translation of the 3rd edition as a child. The rules were too hard so we played other games, especially Warhammer Fantasy Roleplay that was much influenced by RuneQuest and Call of Cthulhu. Recently I bought the scans of Wyrm's Footnotes, which are most fascinating. The layout and feel have much in common with the Principia Discordia, another product of that time and place.
  10. One of the good things about Arthur is that after gaining the crown and kicking the tar out of the saxons, he doesn’t do a lot. Yes, there’s the occasional war, but he’s not really driving the plot. Being a perfect king is a rather passive job. You can tell how he doesn’t get that much screen time in Malory later on. In a way, Lancelot is more annoying, because he does drive the plot, and he’s a “you will never be this good or this cool” NPC.
  11. Today
  12. Unfortunately, Chaosium has backpedalled hard on this interpretation - there was one Argrath and he did all this stuff and that's just the way it goes. YGMV, but this is the official story.
  13. I am just asking little question here and there... I might share the (not play tested yet) base document I am working on one day... but it's not nearly interesting enough yet! It will be based on Master of Orion 2.. Already have character creation rule, race list... but still working on power list, bio-augment list, vehicle list, environmental effect list... (that will be word document one, available to players) (maybe equipment list.. not sure... might just make on the spot and not that many gadget apart from weapon already in the BRP book) and the galaxy quarter document (so far only in my head, as I was wondering about the stapple kind of activity that would please me, and make the game intereting...). that would be word document two!
  14. Yeah, that's one house rule I implemented some years ago - skill category modifiers (or even basing them on two characteristics) is too fiddly to calculate and re-calculate, for such a negligible impact. I just use flat skill base chances like in the original BRP booklet nowadays. Characteristics still do plenty of work what with derived stats (like hit points, damage bonus, etc.), characteristic rolls, and simply help with visualising a character. So, you have an SF setting, is there a thread somewhere? 👀
  15. Yes, what I am arguing is especially the latter context. If the host has organized a chase and one of the participants is taking potshots at the hart with a crossbow or a bow, that surely would be frowned upon. If the knight is by himself and just wants to put some meat on the table, bow-hunting is fine.
  16. Yes, in part. I always study canonical art and attempt to include aspects of it. In this case, the armor I drew is only partly Central Asian in character, as it mixes a bronze cuirass, scale skirt, and lamellar manica and leg armor (I used Jeff's Seshnelan art direction, which the artist above deviated from to use entirely Central Asian style armor - I have copy of a book where the cavalryman appears, in almost exactly the same pose he used, the only obvious difference being the crest he gave the horse...) One thing I wanted to make obvious in this case, is that although the rider is a Noble, and called a knight, he isn't a European medieval knight. In this case, the thigh-guard armor is in addition to the scale skirt and the tubed leg armor, so there isn't a gap, even if the thigh-guards weren't there - they provide additional protection where the rider would be vulnerable from attacks from a foe on foot.
  17. Jar-Eel, and perhaps her 'ally' Great Sister, clearly believe that the Emperor is not serving the Lunar Way. Jar-Eel is also literally the goddess incarnate. She tries to fix the Empire. She does not, immediately, appear to succeed. But Greg was clear in his intention, with exploring the Lunar Way, to eventually write something like King of Sartar, but from the Lunar point of view. He never finished that project, but I think he went a far way down it - and yes, I think he intended for the destruction of the Red Moon to be revealed as a spiritual victory that renews the world, and completes some of the goddesses grand project of spiritual liberation. We just don't know how that endgame plays out, how the last years of the Empire look like from their point of view.
  18. Ah, Darius, always ready to tell us the Lunars are absolutely objectively wrong because they use spiritual arguments to justify terrible things, and that is why Argrath was absolutely right to justify his spiritual disagreements with them to kill several million inhabitants of Peloria, first by winter and famine, then by dropping the remains of a planet on them. If you take the viewpoint of any one Gloranthan culture as true, and their opposition as false, you will then find that according to those assumptions they are totally justified. But you can generally do it in reverse, and come to the opposite conclusion. It's harder to do for, say, Fonrit - and generally, for people from European cultures with less exposure to the traditions Greg classes as mystic to understand them. But its intentional that ever culture in Glorantha can see themselves as the good guys, albeit with some difficult compromises.
  19. The gamemaster might call for a check on Devotion when an adventurer doesn't respond to something their god/cult favors: An Ernaldan ignoring something despoiling the earth A Babeester Gor cultist ignoring a call for vengeance A Chalana Arroy cultist ignoring the wounded or sick An Issaries priest failing to do something about a threat to free trade A Lhankor Mhy scholar turning away from the pursuit of truth, or allowing knowledge to be destroyed More positive examples might be: An Odayla hunter getting the chance to encounter (and perhaps defend) bears in the wild An Orlanthi building a temple in the mountaintops Helping expand the reach of the Seven Mothers cult A Storm Bull resisting the chance to settle a conflict peaceably and instead hulking out For an inspiration, it basically it boils down to "Is this action in line with my cult's beliefs and based on my own devotion?"
  20. It's definitely scifi... But for profession description MW is like: Each profession has 10 skill, pick a profession. In that profession skill list: - pick one, add + 60% - pick 3, add +40% - pick 4, add + 20% much easier... I might get away from skill modifier by category too.. it's too much thinking and for like -8 to +8% variation, in the most extreme case? Plus player want to add extra percent if base characteristic changes.. which is not quite the same at base percentage and at 90+%.... I think I might go with simple flat, race based, starting value of 40%, 20%, 10%, 01%.... per category... for magic no worries.. there will be a bit of psionic and that's it. Though there will be transhumanism though! (augmentation a bit like River of heaven)
  21. I'm late but take my money. I love seeing old rpg treasures like really rare fan zines. It seems yours will be a true treasure of time!
  22. My own RQG campaign is set in Tarsh, and is about the tensions leading up to full civil war between followers of King Pharandros and followers of Fazzur Wideread. Argrath conquers Sartar by initially being drawn in to aid the Fazzurites (at that point led by his son Onjur the Poet).
  23. Good use of reskinning. I don't know the original adventure, but this seems fine and you provided guidelines for adjusting to the size of the PC group.
  24. @LeingodMy issue is that Argrath was an ambiguous character, but recently Chaosium have gone out of their way to feature the guy as an prominent NPC, even going out of their way to Fridge Kallyr instead of keeping her around as an possible npc counterpart to the "good guy turning evil" story of Argrath, @GAZZA Look into Samuel Haight, and I'm not familiar with the Forgotten Realms, but I doubt the rpg books usually had the players right by where Driz'zt was doing what he was doing, whereis Runequest Glorantha openly has the players working in exactly the area he rules where they presumbly have to do his bidding if they wanna be anti-Lunar Orlanthi. Unless Chaosium plans on having Argrath as an villain, the players are going to quickly learn about this Argrath guy and their reaction will be "Wow, sure sounds like the GM's Pet NPC!" once they found out about all of the shit he did to assure the MUCH weaker pcs actually can exist in a Lunar free kingdom. Maybe they won't, but decades of badly handled metaplots in other rpgs and gm horror stories is anyone skeptical of the "great hero" Argrath. "But what about Pendragon? Doesn't it have a lot of scenarios where you just watch King Arthur do cool stuff?" And a lot of years and events that don't involve Arthur with the implication that the Players will be busy with other stuff (Including their own lives) instead of always following Arthur? King Of Sartar was, as you point out an ambigious tale that implied Argrath could've been just the shared name of a bunch of other people. Le Morte Da Arthur is Le Morte Da Arthur. It's an classic of literature. King Of Sartar isn't there yet. I don't think players will be respectful to Argrath the way they might to Arthur. I agree, the issue is that they've decided to make Runequest, "Roleplaying In Glorantha" focus almost solely on the Orlanthi because of admitted appeal to sales. I like the Orlanthi but holy shitters we could move on from them already. But Chaosium decided to have them as the start of their foundations for the future, and I strongly doubt we're going to ever see areas like the Lunar Kingdom get the respect they deserve considering the usual cycle of cancelled Runequest Products. I.E. Runequest 6 Glorantha. Which was going to have Balazarings and sorcery rules...compare that to """RuneQuest 4."""
  25. You need to be quite clear which options you have switched on and which you have switched off if you're presenting BRP to a newcomer. Even if you go full-on crunch you're still not using every option. If you come to the book cold and think all those rules are there to be used at once, it can be pretty off-putting. Or, as you say, you can go with MW (though I assume you'll have to tailor it to your SF setting?).
  26. Generally speaking, I agree that sorcery is intrinsically linguistic in nature, and probably extremely difficult or quite likely impossible without a written symbol system - and Greg certainly saw it as very strongly linked to writing. And it draws inspiration from a lot of IRL magical tradition that are closely linked to written forms, such as the Kabbalah, the magical sigils of Western European planetary magic and goetia, etc.
  27. It seems fairly clear to me from the Middle Sea Empire, by far the best source we have on the God Learners, that the God Learners were quite intellectually diverse, with a lot of competing sects and factions, that often had quite different magical practices too. I don't think the mainstream faction, the Makanists, were generally Illuminated, but instead were pure sorcerers - and it was an extremist element within that tradition that was responsible for Zistor and the Clanking City. Another, very large but still minority, faction was the Malkioneranists, and they look to have followed a variant of Illumination, though one they understood poorly - but that did give them a lot of ability to explore, use, and plunder divine magic. Just don't look to find one single explanation of what God Learners did - they were a large, pluralist, empire, and a particularly notably intellectually diverse one.
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