Jump to content

Leaderboard

Popular Content

Showing content with the highest reputation on 03/29/2021 in all areas

  1. Another question is if Arkat is the Seven-headed God (Guide 376-377) why are there only five Arkats now. Where are the other two? Which of the aspects is missing? I'm not a fan of theories that point to extra-ralian figures as aspects of Arkat. For example the Black Dragon Mountain Pictographs XIII and onwards clearly has "an uzko and four men"* as the Arkats. Harrek is depicted elsewhere and so he is not one of the five, The Arkats set up an uneasy polity ("The Arkats wear a collective crown but fight amongst themselves" Guide p748, "The New Archons had proclaimed the Dark Empire my ancestor had founded. But they were weak and disunited" Guide p750) which IMO rules out Argrath** and others. *which also implies that the chaotic Arkat is still in human form and working with the other four! **Also Cragspider was right next door to Argrath? If he was one of the five, wouldn't the pictographys have shown him in Ralios? The missing aspects, I think, are the Peacemaker (nobody is bringing peace with the Elbves and Dwarves) and the Great Arkat (if he was present, the other Arkats wouldn't be fighting amongst themselves would they?) Kimiv (Duke of Naskorion) could be the Troll as he worships Argan Argar and so can turn into one. But the Troll Aspect is Arkat the Destroyer and there is a tension between Argan Argar and Zorak Zoran, the God most associated with Arkat the Destroyer (although Kimiv does establish Zorakarkat). Chaosbane seems to be Arkat as a Humakti who it is in that guise that he is acclaimed as the Killer-of-Chaos by the Slontans which he "dearly coveted" Guide p129. I'm inclined to rule out Garyunder as his son picks a fight with Five Arkats as a Dragon according to the Pictographs. Argin Terror is obvs the Devil. The Liberator is Arkat as a Hrestoli (explicitly described as such on Guide p376). I think this is Aamor (Guide p413). That leaves the Saviour by my reckoning. There are two claimants also unaccounted for (Foyalfine of Azilos and Erengazor of Sentanos)
    6 points
  2. Rather than a trans-human, I'd say that Harrek would be tantamount to a cyborg: Not bio-mechanically, but bio-spiritually enhanced by the White Bear. This is exactly what I was asking for. It looks like that the typical kin conflict in Glorantha is not among brothers (representing each one different archetypes or foundational paradigms), but among uncles and nephews (which suggests a generational relay).
    4 points
  3. Eughh. To quote Stewie, Darius, you are one sick puppy!
    3 points
  4. Since many of the major gods are kin - especially the Air and Sky gods - the Gods War is going to also be a tale of kin strife. Yelm's father is Orlanth and Humakt's grandfather. Storm Bull fought against Ragnaglar, his brother. That's in the nature of the Gods War - the original Unity was shattered by the birth of Umath and the Young Gods expanded and grew, coming into conflict with the Old.
    3 points
  5. It'll be a few days before I can get it, but I will be getting it.
    3 points
  6. The Bible keeps running the mytheme that you absolutely should usurp the rights of your older brother(s), ideally through trickery. Orlanth becoming chief of the Storm Tribe despite being the youngest has shades of this. As does stealing Death from Humakt.
    3 points
  7. Last post for Kaxtorplose for a while. While I like the idea of taking brutalism to be the expression of the more fantastical elements of Kaxtorplose, my current visual inspiration for Kaxtorplose in a more historical form is the bronze age Nuragic civilization, especially the ruins of Su Nuraxi:
    3 points
  8. Perhaps the original twin founders of the Skanthi were caught by Dorastran magicians and perverted to dominate the Skanthi?
    2 points
  9. (As an additional question, does anyone have even a wild theory why the male part of the siamese twin-bodied chaos monster in Dorastor is named "Skanth"? It must surely not be a coincidence?)
    2 points
  10. In a similar way, I am playing and GMing RQ since close to 40 years: I have always played in Glorantha, but before RQG, I had never GMed in Glorantha. I have used RQ3 for 1 home campaign in Rome, 1 Vikings campaign, 2 Land of Ninja campaign, 1 SF campaign (with some psi powers built along the rules for lunar magic). Frankly, if missing, RQG would have been completely different, and much less interesting for me. My own tastes would have been to start from RQ3, not RQ2.
    2 points
  11. As for myself, I'd be in favor of having Hit Points that are essentially Fatigue/Morale Points, and the only noteworthy Wounds are the result of a StormBringer-like "Major Wound" rule, or continuing the fight with few or no Hit Points remaining.
    2 points
  12. You might find these helpful: Guide Art Direction – The Seven Faces of Arkat (2013) A Question About Arkati Henotheism and Arkat’s Runes Arkat in the prosopaedia - lists the five Arkats https://www.drivethrurpg.com/product/12429/HeroQuest-Glorantha--Introduction-to-the-Hero-Wars
    2 points
  13. Thanks for spotting the three errors mentioned. The will be corrected and also added to the errata document. We do use professional proofreaders, as you would see in the books' credits. But, sometimes, they are unable to catch everything, so we are grateful to those who let us know where errors still exist, allowing us to update files accordingly.
    2 points
  14. Malkioni mythology (the mortal variety, not Brithini) seems to have a common mytheme of sacrifice/martyrdom. Malkion the Sacrifice saved the world. Xemela sacrificed herself during the Darkness I think? Hrestol was straight up martyred for professing his beliefs. There might be others. It's not that the other mythologies don't have it, but I posit that Malkionism seems to idealize it more centrally, perhaps?
    2 points
  15. I favor 'Crisis of Infinite Arkats'. Five cults in Ralios all manage to Heroform a different Arkat and each of them latches onto a different 'Gbaji' figure. I like your idea of how the cults broke the Godlearner lock and that's how it happens. I would add 'It's because Argath was trying to tap into Arkat Power'. Chaos Arkat fixates on Argath as his new Gbaji to go after. (Chaos Arkat should call himself Malal, but that's just me mixing game universes.) Stygian Arkat tries to rebuild the Stygian Empire and goes after whatever is in the way of that. Another Arkat decides the Rokari church is fundamentally corrupt and can't stop until it's wiped out. Kingtroll Arkat goes to Dragon Pass, teams up with Argath and urges him on to kill everyone in Peloria on general principles. Doies this mean a Kingtroll vs Chaos Arkati battle? Of course it does. The Fifth Arkat should take his Arkating into Fronela.
    2 points
  16. If you really need a big ass bestiary that is in the ballpark of compatible with Magic World, the Gigas Monstrum I & II books have been useful to me on occasion. It's basically an authorized reworking of Frog God Games Tome of Horrors for Legend, so it's pretty trivial to calculate total hit points and armor and abilities from the included descriptions and stat blocks. Also, a pretty cheap deal to get them as a bundle. Eternity Realms Saving Bundle! [BUNDLE] - Solace Games | DriveThruRPG.com
    2 points
  17. It's interesting, because I think we can talk about the narrative tropes of the game world since the Dawn, and both we and the inhabitants of Glorantha can talk about the mythemes of GodTime. For example, I feel confident in saying that since time began, the world of Glorantha tends to associate universal ideals with imperial projects. Nysalor, the EWF, the Godlearners, the Lunars... As a setting, I think Glorantha has some concerns about the hubris of universal and imperial projects baked into it. Before time, I think a common narrative arc of various mythologies is a movement of the world from simplicity to complication (more peoples, more difference, more disagreements, etc). I feel confident in saying that's in Pelorian myth, Orlanthi myth, and Malkioni myth. Surviving the darkness required forging a new balance that acknowledge more difference than what could have existed in the Green or Golden Ages.
    2 points
  18. The widow’s portion is to some degree a question of just how far you want to go down the road of King Arthur Pendragon: Exciting Adventures in Medieval Litigation and the Development of the Common Law. In the real world, there were a lot of court cases about dower (what this is called in law) — there were, I believe, cases where mothers ended up suing their sons for not giving them what they were entitled to. I’m not an expert, but I’ve looked into this a bit. Some thoughts:- - There isn’t a commercial market in “knightly real estate” as such. In principle, I believe you can alienate land held by knight service, but as you’re still liable for the knight service, you’re not likely to do so to any significant extent. The instinct, I think, was always to amass land, not to alienate it unless in truly desperate circumstances. Endowments are the main exception, and those are obviously about the care of your immortal soul. There are plenty of instances of people paying kings to make them baron of such-and-such, though, and I’m sure that such things also happened at lower levels of the hierarchy. But it would be a large sum of money, and involve loyalty, politics etc. —this is an enormous favor, and one always wants to ask why it’s not going to some deserving household knight or somesuch. Cf. heiresses (a more normal way to acquire land). As it happens, the law of dower discouraged the development of a market in landed property, even where the land was held by fee simple (no service). The wife doesn’t get 1/3 of what the husband has at the time of his death — she gets 1/3 of whatever he had at any point during the marriage, even if he has sold or given it to someone else. This prevents obvious dodges such as giving your property to your brother before you die to prevent your wife getting her dower. Heirs were expected to compensate buyers for this after the death of the seller, so a husband would be directly damaging his heir if he alienated property to which his wife had a claim. On the whole, the heir is more likely to look for other ways to supplement his income, such as marrying well (since the main effect is to make it difficult for him to support a wife and children, a dowry is the natural thing that might compensate), office, plunder, winning tournaments, adding improvements, etc. -In reality, of course, the heir is often the son of the widow, and she will go on living in the manor with him after his father’s death. In fact, she has a right to do so (freebench), although it varied from place to place for how long she could do so, and exactly how it worked, whether it terminated if she remarried, etc. In such cases, though, you can probably forget about the dower — she might be getting separate income, but in practice it’s all going into the “Family” pot in the abstract and standardized £10 manor. (Part of why this is all a bit wacky is that in the real world, manors were obviously not standardized at all.) In some places, I believe that freebench and dower were mutually exclusive — the widow did not get 1/3 unless she left the household (most often to remarry, I imagine). If you adopt that, this will not come up in situations in which a mother is continuing to live with the son and heir. - Pendragon describes the developed position in the common law, pretty much. But unsurprisingly, in the real world it was more complicated. Local customs varied — and courts could regard local custom as having the force of law. For instance, in Salford, freebench seems to have been the entirety of a widow’s rights, and there was no dower. In Bristol, you could at least make a case quite late (16th century) that dower only applied to what the husband had at the time of the marriage, not any subsequent acquisitions. In Lincoln, there was a custom that the dower only consisted of land that the husband held at the time of his death, not at any time during the marriage. I’m not sure how many of those specific examples are known definitely to be medieval, but they give the general picture. Early on, there were, I believe, cases where dower was only so long as the wife remained chaste and unmarried, although this is not the way it worked in the law as it eventually developed. So if this really bothers you, you can just declare that “The custom of Salisbury [or wherever] is [like Salford].” As with manors, there should “realistically” be more local variation in Pendragon in general — if a GM and their players want that headache! (And medieval England is comparatively *standardized* compared to the continent...) - If you really want to complicate this, though, as far as this sort of thing goes, Pendragon tends to default to the later common law — it’s the equivalent of how it would be if the game picked one period for military technology. You could instead have the game change the legal position of widows to match how the law developed in reality. Approximately — the following simplifies things a bit, even from my non-expert perspective. Someone who really knows their way around this would probably find it very oversimplified. But it’s about right. Uther/Anarchy: Equivalent to the 11th century. There is no hard-and-fast rule. A lord is expected to see to it that a widow receives some reasonable proportion of her husband’s lands to support her and her children, but the lord decides what is reasonable. Boy King/Conquest: Equivalent to the 12th century. Dower develops, and before the end of the Conquest period is firmly established as a common law rule. It applies only to the land that the husband had at the time of marriage, not any later acquisitions. Husbands can decide at the time of marriage what their wife will get at their deaths, but the wife can also go to law to claim her common law dower. Romance Period/Tournament: Equivalent to the 13th-early 14th centuries. The widow’s rights expand. By the end of the Romance Period, the dower comprises 1/3 of any lands that the husband had at any time during the marriage and that her children by him could inherit. This remains standard throughout the Tournament period. Grail/Twilight Periods: Equivalent to the mid-14th through 15th centuries. Legal ways for husbands to get around dower, such as jointure and use (see below), become common and although in law the widow’s position remains the same, in practice the widow’s rights diminish somewhat. Jointure: Jointure is where, as part of the marriage settlement, a portion of lands is set aside to be jointly held by both husband and wife and to go to the spouse who outlives the other — as an alternative to dower. In law, a widow (before 1536) could always reject this and claim her common law dower instead. But obviously that involves going to law to enforce her rights, and litigation is time-consuming, expensive, and uncertain. One author I looked at indicated that by about 1400 (beginning of the Twilight period) jointure was being treated as superseding dower, effectively if not in legal theory, and that as a result many widows were getting less than the “reasonable third” to which they were in law entitled. Use: Use was a situation where one granted land to someone else in return for them letting you retain the practically advantageous rights associated with it. Effectively, the grantor was in the position of the owner, but technically, it was the people to whom he had granted the land who owned it. This could be used as a dodge to get out of various obligations, including dower. If a husband had done this before marrying, the land was effectively his, but as he was not in law the person who was holding it, his wife had no claim on it after his death.
    2 points
  19. So, I'm not an expert on Ralios, and there's not a ton written about it in the publications I have. In another thread, I would love to get a handle on the 3rd Age history of Ralios, but in this thread, I'd like some help figuring out how the Hero Wars unfold there. My knowledge is mostly limited to the "Hero War Begins" sidebars in the Guide. The stated events are The Five Arkats, the Swarm, One God One King One Empire, and Hezel Darong far to the east. I can wrap my head at least a little around all of them except the Five Arkats. This is what The Guide says: My understanding is that when the Godlearners broke the Stygian Empire, they locked down the ability for Arkati to access Arkat via heroquesting. For the last sever centuries, various Arkati factions have been trying to break the GL firewalls, and during that time their doctrines and secret knowledges increasingly diverged from one another. Do I have all that right? Suddenly, all the firewalls drop, and people have access to 5 Arkats. Do the Arkats literally come to life again in and around Safelster, or are they visions of Arkat that may now be contacted? Are they "metaphorical" Arkats with the 5 Arkats being major heroes across Genertela? Something else? Finally, timing: Despite being listed first in the Guide, I could imagine the order is Swarm in 1622, Seshnela / Tanisor invades, and then sometime in the mid-late 1620s the Arkats emerge. Or dothe Arkats really emerge first?
    1 point
  20. I toyed with something like that. Inspired partially by Flashing Blades, I considered halving all weapon damaged and then doubling the dice per success level. A sword might do 1D4/2D4/4D4 or 1D6/2D6/4D6. That way a lot of hits would be minor strikes for minimal damage-especially if we added in another success level (marginal, half the success chance or higher).
    1 point
  21. At first, yes. Then it changes it up.
    1 point
  22. Most of the examples above have to do with Orlanthi/Storm deities (at least in part) suggesting perhaps that this is tied into the relative latecoming of the Storm Pantheon. Storm are perpetual younger relatives, trying to carve out their own sphere/property, even amongst each other. If I were to put my anthropologist hat fully on, I'd definitely try to tie it into their inheritance system(s), but as far as I know, it's probably a coincidence overall, since Orlanthi isn't matrilineal with avuncular inheritance or anything like that.
    1 point
  23. 1 point
  24. Depending on the amount of world-building you put in in defining your setting, picking and choosing elements from Glorantha for your world-building is always a possibility. The "what your parent/grandparent did" part needs to be redone for your own setting, of course. But it is a good exercise to create your setting, asking about major incidents in the recent past and how your community would be involved. Using the runes in another setting can be done easily. For my homebrew RQ3 setting, the runes were the major constellations or objects in the sky. Creating your own set of deities, with slightly different powers for e.g. the storm giants aiding the earth-and-stars pantheon of the previous folk enslaved by dreadful über-sorcerers is not that hard. Quite a bit can be inherited. You need your own names and interactions of those deities and mythical monsters and other baddies. My RQ3 setting had Chaos as a corrupting intruder similar to Pern, and the existential threat as the ousted but not quite gone über-sorcerers of the past. And it had other evils or at least defense-aganst-destruciton-weakening entities or magical methods. RQG doesn't have the nice world-building guidelines that RQ3 had. Not yet, I guess. The text exists, and it is as relevant to Glorantha as to any other setting, so I expect it to re-surface as advice to the GM. Doing your world-building around such elements may limit your freedom a bit, but so does every attempt at world building that has to go with a magic system (or several).
    1 point
  25. I'm not 100% sure what OP is trying to ask for examples of in this thread, but something that's way more common in glorantha than brothers killing brothers seems to be frequently bloody conflicts that arise between uncles and nephews, which are sometimes morally justified by the involved cultures, if they're not ignoring the possible family relation. Umath and Shargash, Yelm and Orlanth, Orlanth and Daga, Vadrus and Barntar, Storm Bull and Wakboth to name a few off the top of my head, plus the whole initiation of Orlanth myth of the potentially homicidal (deicidal?) uncles and their pits.
    1 point
  26. I'm not so sure Malkion the Sacrifice is canon any more. The myth of his destruction while trying to unite the cosmos is. But since Jeff was making noises not so long ago about the God Learners identifying Malkion as Flesh Man, that kinda makes the notion of a sacrifice untenable. I'm not a great fan of Malkioni Saints being validated through martyrdom. They aren't Christians. Hrestol wasn't martyred for professing his beliefs, he was executed for causing major havoc in Brithos (I've been told that one of his followers killed the reigning Talar of Brithos) and elsewhere
    1 point
  27. I saw the guy at the counter at Milsims wearing a Runequest T shirt, and when I quized him about it he said he he bought it himself online. He was obviously motivated. Maybe they're still finding their feet after lockdown and just havent got roumd to updating everything on the website. I do miss the mail out catalogue they used to have.
    1 point
  28. I noticed this as well, so I never showed my players that picture from the scenario's art. I just assumed the artist didn't realize the actual age of the twin boys when he or she drew the portrait.
    1 point
  29. Hi gang! I've recently published my first (hopefully not last) Miskatonic Repository adventure. I would like to share it with you. 🙂 It's called "The Future's Shadow" (edgy, I know) and is designed as a single session heavily based on the investigators' story. Gather your friends for one evening of true horror! Here's the link with more info: https://www.drivethrurpg.com/product/351299/English-The-Futures-Shadow And here's the discount for first 50 cultists. First come, first served! https://www.drivethrurpg.com/browse.php?discount=9103e42857 I'll more than happily answer any questions you have. 🙂 Cheers!
    1 point
  30. Yet there are trans-humanists in Glorantha - heroes like Jareel, Harrak, Zabur and Ralzakark. Arguably anyone who heroquests has taken their first step on the path to trans-humanism.
    1 point
  31. In his Blog "The Brown Book of Zzabur" Tindalos suggested that the Helerings may have been the ancestors of the Weeders, possibly the Osliran River People and (IIRC) the Nogatendites.
    1 point
  32. I just purchased a copy of the slipcase set from my local store. It is a gorgeous set. The books look great and are of high physical quality. Each page is a delight to peruse. However, my initial experience of the text leaves me disappointed. While skimming the book for the first time, I flipped pages, enjoying the layout and pictures and the presentations of the creatures and deities. Unfortunately, EACH of the few times I stopped at random places to read the text, I encountered textual errors. Some of those I saw at random are such that I was reminded of using a spell checker w/o actually reading the text in a critical manner. For example, A Leviathan has a Combat action called "Thrash (mnvr). The description says, "...trashes the victim...". Is "Yolanda" really pronounced "Yo-land-RAH"? (Volume 2, p. 253) I also found a glaring error in the description of the Courtiers of King in Yellow, pallid dancers. They are described as having robes that develop razor edges when they initiate their "dance of death". Yet, in the stat block description if their characteristics, under the Combat section, we are told that the robes only turn into razors when they courtier is NOT engaged in the dance of death. [See attached example images.] I am glad to have the books. They contain lots of great information. I look forward to digesting them and using what I find in them. I am disappointed, however, at buying yet more expensive RPG books that appear to me to have not been given the eye for textual detail that they deserve.
    1 point
  33. Looks cool—putting it on my Wishlist!
    1 point
  34. Agreed! I personally don't care for Glorantha at all, and I've always created my own setting with every previous edition. Glorantha is so hardwired into RQG that the rules as written are practically useless to me.
    1 point
  35. @JonHook A question if you don't mind. Handout3 of the two 10 year old boys has me baffled. The boys in the handout looks substantially older than 10. I consulted my wife and another friend and all thinks it look like young adult men. So is there a reason for the boys yo look so old, or am I putting to much into it?
    1 point
  36. Bought it. Just out of curiosity what my polish neighbours do. 🙂
    1 point
  37. Quite often a son and nephew are treated as brothers, especially if they live together and are similar in age.
    1 point
  38. For what it is worth - in some older stories and in places like Saird, Orlanth and Yelm are the Two Rival Brothers. And the Orlanthi readily acknowledge that killing Yelm had Bad Consequences. Just as the Greeks readily admit that Zeus was dick about that hold Prometheus thing.
    1 point
  39. You tease me with all this fantastic stuff, and then you tell me I have to wait until summer? (Which means June at least.) Shame on you! 😉
    1 point
  40. A major mytheme in Central Glorantha is rebellion. In Solar Pelorian mythologies, rebellion is the social corrosion that drives the cosmos towards degradation and corruption. In Orlanthi/Lightbringer mythology, rebellion is the legitimate assertion of autonomy against tyranny ("No One Can Make You Do Anything" and "Violence Is Always An Option"). Obviously, neither culture completely disallows nor completely promotes rebellion in all forms, where they largely disagree is on the form of legitimate authority, which has put them at odds for centuries, but which also means that they kinda share many of the same underlying ideas. (Orlanth's killing of Yelm can be seen as a form of brother-killing - technically an uncle-killing, but neither mythologies really acknowledge this implicit relation in any overt ways, so it doesn't appear to be significant). The survival myth is also extemely important all over Glorantha (with the possible notable exception of the East Islands/Vithela), which appears to often be used as an explanation for the form of society. It does, however, take wildly different forms. On another note, and one you're likely aware of so it might be unnecessary to mention, exploiting mythemes/mythical archetypes to achieve magical results within Time is a long-established method in Glorantha, so you'll probably see a lot of these running around. The Dara Happan Emperors are all emulating Yelm/Murharzarm, for example, and derive strong magic from it. Heroquesting is basically just reenacting mythemes in order to strengthen the moral lessons they provide, and likely derive magical benefits from it. You could also argue that Esrolian foreign policy is an emulation of Ernaldan/Earth mythemes, where aligning oneself with whichever male deity is in ascendance is preferable to asserting overt political power oneself. Earth cultures all over Glorantha have a long-standing practice of sorta seemingly submitting or withdrawing, while drawing benefits from this relation. It's obviously a "moral lesson" that we can critique in the real world as idealizing a form of feminine-masculine smybiosis that is overly idealized and realistically a lot more harsh for the feminine (it's hard to argue that the Oasis People in Prax have a complete consent in their relation with the Beast Nomads, for example, perhaps a bit like how a housewife might be understood as having some power in her domestic sphere, but her autonomy is still pretty limited and she is often at the mercy of patriarchal practices. There's a reason why Ersolans are wary of the orthodox Orlanthi king model). My point is, this appears to be a kind of Gloranthan moral lesson that might've been embraced by some human cultures at various points in human history, even if it appears... uncomfortable to us. (I guess it helps that in Glorantha fertility magic and the withholding of such is a lot more powerful than in the real world. In Glorantha, pissing off the Earth Queen is BAD.) The Doraddi, arguably an Earth people in their own right, basically said "f*** this shit I'm out" and appear to be doing pretty well with that solution.
    1 point
  41. Thanks! I hope you will have fun playing the scenario. If you have any comments or suggestions, I'm more than happy to listen.
    1 point
  42. I know in another post the moderators confirmed that they were having trouble getting Runequest up on Roll20, something about the Roll20 staff being really busy and haven't been able to do it yet, or something along those lines. What I'm wondering is with the starter set coming out is there any plans to get it up on Roll20? It would certainly help boost it's promotion and sale. Just wondering, thank you. The Starter Set looks beautiful.
    1 point
  43. That would be a hell of a Starter Set scenario.
    1 point
  44. Adding to this, I cannot even begin to count the number of times while working the booth at Essen, Gen Con, and Dragonmeet, fans looked at the Call of Cthulhu Starter Set and asked if we would be doing one for RuneQuest. When we said "Yes" the answer was always enthusiasm, often along the lines of "I'll buy multiple copies and give them away as gifts." It is also a very popular question with our foreign partners.
    1 point
  45. https://www.chaosium.com/blogrunequest-starter-set-design-diary-2-cover-art-reveal-and-whats-inside-the-box/?
    1 point
  46. I'll add some other proposals that make your Glorantha vary a bit more: The Dundealos have completely collapsed years ago and are not coming back (or at least not in numbers big enough to make a clan, let alone a tribe)... so after the Dragonrise, when the occupiers on their lands are in disarray, it's all up for grabs. Pick a clan, any clan. Declare that they were a bit too cozy with the Lunars, and that after 1625 their neighbours attacked them and ran them out of their lands. Serves them right! Your refugees, on the other hand, have deals (old or recent) with someone in power (Kallyr, Leika, whoever) and get these lands as a gift... or have to work their way into them. The good thing is that it lets you pick almost any place you like in Dragon Pass. Tweak the date of the Maboder massacre, ignore Jomes Wulf and have your refugees be the ones who push the Telmori back! They're desperate, and that gives Passion bonuses for combat!
    1 point
  47. I think that Tennyson deserves the credit for the matching that you mention (for the adultery, that is, not the incest, which he omitted); his "Idylls of the King" definitely give the Love Triangle the role of destroying Arthur's kingdom - with the further touch that it's here the Love Triangle itself, rather than its mere exposure, which dooms Camelot. In Malory and the Vulgate, it's the exposure of the Affair that ends Arthur's reign; as long as it was kept secret, the kingdom flourished, and only when Agravain and Mordred brought it into the open did the civil wars erupt. In Tennyson, the Love Affair was dangerous even before the war began, by setting a bad example to the knights and ladies of Arthur's court (Tennyson revising a few originally unconnected tales, such as Balin and Balan, or Pelleas and Ettarde, to stress this interpretation).
    1 point
  48. Here is the alternate ending for the 'Of Wrath and Blood' scenario that I devised as the Investigators did not initially defeat the ghoul Jean Paul La Croix in his Ghoul's Den but instead fled before the ghoul arrived. The original scenario ends with Walter Corbitt and Jean Paul La Croix being defeated in the Ghoul's Den chamber, so this alternate ending was necessary to resolve things for the Investigators (SPOILERS BELOW). The Investigators find the Macario twin boys in Jean Paul's Den, but the ghoul himself is nowhere to be seen. Combat with the fiend Walter Corbitt, who had possessed Francesco Macario before the events of The Haunting scenario, lasts only a few rounds as the Investigators are able to dispel Corbitt quickly. As stipulated in the scenario, Jean Paul does not return until the sixth round after the Investigators enter his Den. Instead, the Investigators are warned by Faustino Macario of the "monster man" who comes and goes through the open sewer pipe connected to the chamber. The Investigators take the boys and begin to make their way through the network of tunnels connecting the Ghoul's Den to the abandoned La Croix family mausoleum. Jean Paul emerges from the sewer pipe, finds the boys gone, and then begins to give chase to the Investigators. The Investigators are able to escape into the mausoleum and then out its doors into the daylight of the St. Michael's Memorial Gardens cemetery. As the ghoul Jean Paul La Croix is now a loose end and may kill innocent victims again, the Investigators must track him down to deal with the creature. After notifying the Baltimore police and returning the boys to their aunt and uncle, Enzo and Maria Giordano, the Investigators return to the cemetery the next morning. They find that the Ghoul Den has been buried by collapsing the rocky ceiling above, concealing any evidence of the Chapel of Contemplation symbol and altar which was found by the Investigators in the chamber the day before. The Investigators have the options of staking out the docks where Jean Paul had earlier murdered his victims or waiting at the St. Michael's Memorial Gardens cemetery during the night to see if the ghoul returns to his former home. That day, the Investigators speak to a junior priest at St. Michael's Catholic Church near the cemetery and discover that Father Enrique Domingo (whom the Investigators had previously met early in the scenario) disappeared yesterday after not showing up for evening mass at the church. A nun also tells the Investigators that Father Domingo had been observed some weeks earlier studying a strange tome (which turns out to be The Cult of Ghouls grimoire found by the Investigators inside the Den's altar the day before) in the church basement's archives, alone at night. The young priest then tells the Investigators about a Father Richard La Croix at the Church of the Immaculate Conception on the other side of town who was also interested in the church's archives, dating back to colonial times. The Investigators had found extensive La Croix family records related to St. Michael's during their visit with Father Domingo, detailing the exorcism of Jean Paul La Croix by Cardinal Edward Talbot and his subsequent "death" in 1805. The Investigators pay a visit late that afternoon to Father Richard La Croix at the Church of the Immaculate Conception. Father La Croix invites them to visit the La Croix family mansion in Baltimore tomorrow evening to meet his family and to discuss their tragic history. The Investigators agree. The Investigators decide to stake out the church cemetery and spy Father Domingo returning to St. Michael's by myself well past midnight. They manage to surprise the corrupt priest (who had actually been an acolyte of the Chapel of Contemplation all along) in the church basement as he was studying a map of the ghoul tunnels under Baltimore. The Investigators take Father Domingo captive, tie him up in the trunk of their car, and then pay a late visit to the Church of the Immaculate Conception. The ghoul tunnel map shows that there is an entrance to the tunnels underneath this church. The Investigators visit the empty church, pick the side door lock, and find a hidden trap door in the church's basement. They enter the ghoul tunnels which connect to what appears to be a residence some distance from the church, as well as the Baltimore Public Library among other locations throughout the city. The Investigators push open another trap door from the tunnels and exit into what appears to be the neglected, cobweb-strewn basement of a spacious home. The mansion seems be mostly abandoned with no regular occupants, but perhaps the occasional visitor. The Investigators hear activity coming from the mansion's attic and climb up its ladder to find the ghoul Jean Paul La Croix, who ferociously attacks them! Jean Paul La Croix is put to rest (this time for real) and the Investigators realize that this attic is where the ghoul's exorcism chronicled in the La Croix family church records took place. The simple bed in the attic is fitted with heavy leather restraints and there are framed pictures of a handsome young man who was once Jean Paul La Croix. The Investigators find a journal of the Baltimore Chapel of Contemplation's activities and evidence that both Father Domingo and Father La Croix are senior members. Father La Croix was planning on leading the Investigators into an ambush the next evening; the La Croix family mansion has been empty for years and is now used as a hideout by the Chapel of Contemplation cultists. The ghoul was instead surprised in his resting place and slain before he could kill the Investigators with Father La Croix's assistance. Not desiring to confront Father La Croix, the Investigators dump an unconscious (its very hot in the trunk of the car) Father Domingo in the woods outside Baltimore and then skip town, gathering their luggage at The Grand Hotel in downtown Baltimore and then hitting the road back to Arkham at first morning light. There is always the chance that Father Domingo, Father La Croix, and the Chapel of Contemplation could cross the Investigators' paths again...
    1 point
  49. Yes, absolutely. To put it bluntly, what I've found is that whenever there's substantial downtime my players want to train more obsessively than some steroid-crazed 'builders on instagram. The "oh they still have to have real jobs to support themselves and their lives" becomes meaningless the first time they manage to find even a rather trivial treasure...not that they can necessarily live like kings forever (unless you mistakenly give them some of the piles of loot from RQ2 scenarios without first seriously editing them...sheesh!) but 'daily bread' really ain't their concern any longer (even giving 90% to their cults). So no, our campaign runs pretty nearly like the tv show 24...it is a constant barrage of happenings that they could ignore but I know they won't. Not unrealistically, I think, I expect that a world like Glorantha with ACTIVE MONSTER POPULATIONS, actual inimical evil cults, atop all the normal human drama of crime, war, families, etc. if a local potentate finds a reliable band of 'fixers' to solve a lot of blunt-force problems, he/she is going to use them extensively. If they're NOT reliable...well then sending them off to their doom isn't a bad idea either. And then there's going to be the fact that anyone inimical is soon going to recognize these individuals as "something that they'll need to deal with if they want to X" ...the plotlines just write themselves. The idea that a group like that can only find essentially one "thing" to deal with per SEASON is ...unrealistically sedate for such a world, in my view. And downright dull. FINALLY, I very much liked some advice I read from Orson Scott Card about writing that a single plot line is fairly dull. Really interesting stuff happens at the INTERSECTIONS of things...so take your typical classic "hey there's a spooky tomb we should explore" vanilla adventure crawl. But then intersect it with a local violent rebellion in full swing in the same area and you can get some interesting plot twists that even I as a GM didn't even faintly expect. I did bow to a general request from them at one point that they begged for downtime...not that I was forcing them down rails, but I was perhaps a little too effusive with plot hooks that they couldn't ignore happening when the previous "thing" was only 75% done so they never felt that they had a time to catch a breath. I wasn't sad about that but I did try to give them SOME breathing time lately.
    1 point
  50. That's not quite right. Orlanth Rex is a TRIBAL cult. The chief priest of the clan Orlanth temple serves as the chieftain of that clan (think village and its surroundings). The tribal Orlanth Rex is a special figure - he (or she) needs to be approved by all the tribal priests and that individual serves as the head (high priest) of the Orlanth cult (and binds all of the tribal Rune Masters to his Command Priests spell). The Orlanth Rex of a tribe is the tribal king. The systems are not exactly parallel.
    1 point
×
×
  • Create New...