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  1. The latest in our Chaosium Interview series features Lynne Hardy, line editor of our forthcoming Rivers of London RPG, which is based on the popular series of novels by Ben Aaronovitch. Lynne updates us on recent developments, including playtesting. She is talking with Chaosium's James Coquillat.
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  2. Herbivores, like cows, do eat small amounts of meat when they can get it - cows nab mice and shrews on the reg, which is startling to the onlooker to see. I reckon it is like that, as too much would freak out their system. One herd-man divided amongst a tribe as a ritual sacrifice is a small portion for such a large individual - morokanth are large. Yeah, this would be deeply unsettling. However, showing them the herd-men might help: they are non-sentient, and their heads don't have big brains. They aren't identical to humans in this way: they have tiny heads behind their face, no brain. Reconstructions of early hominids are google-able, just replace the ape-like faces (if you want to, I believe they are supposed to have human faces). One of the things that makes herd-men broo visible aside from their hooves is their tiny heads. You can't fool a Praxian; they'll look at a clever broo trying to pass as a human and immediately see a herd man. A Heortling/Esrolian might easily be fooled, though... and beware the Mallian witch in a head-dress
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  3. Mine, too, unless this is about uplifted species. There are way too many vertebrate aliens in science fiction, one thing that Lovecraft and BEM pulp SF got fairly right. Even with panspermia, the chance survival of the Cambrian explosion then mass extinction by those headless chordata proto-fish won't necessarily have repeated on other planets. Other Suns is a solid SF rpg if you replace the aliens with something more sensible, or otherwise if you give them a Dr Moreau backstory. Its tech level is much closer to what you see in other SF than anything provided in Traveller (which is basically Cold War military veterans with their weapons tech and education in aristocratic space).
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  4. I think you're likely to see small/tiny animal figures on crudes shelves / in alcoves perhaps gathered around an Ernalda / Eiritha figure (think the Minoan lady with the cat on her head) with an audience of her children in various local styles: (Silla figure) (Cypriot Hellenistic and Roman terracottas) referred to as mother and father (animal type). Some may have had personal experience of the horse mother, cow mother etc and so know them by their names. Have a look at some animal mythologies across our world. You'll often find the animals with very simple names, that vary from region to region. In the temple, they have the best figures or frescos of them in tiny detail on the walls. Children often make crude clay versions of which their parents are very proud or parents make them themselves out of bone, wood, clay, or what ever is handy. On certain holy days all the children bring their cow / sheep / whatever figure and put it on the altar so it can be blessed and brought home to look after the real animals.
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  5. Pity the Rhino Rider who has to help direct him, probably using both hands.
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  6. While I’ve been playing Call of Cthulhu for nearly a decade, I only recently made the jump to the online community, coinciding with my start GMing games. One thing that surprised me was the high volume of Cthulhu RPG variants and systems, only a few of which I’d previously been aware of. I did some looking around and couldn’t find a good guide differentiating between the different systems—so, inspired by klecser’s post, I decided to do the research to make one. Some of this is cribbed from Jalor218 on Reddit and Morgan on 21st Century Philosopher. Jalor218’s comment that he hadn’t played half the systems he summarized gave me the confidence to take a stab at something similar. I've drawn attention to the most high-profile systems—the ones that I've seen referenced time and again online—by putting them in green. If I’ve misrepresented something or left out essential details, please let me know and I’ll be happy to revise this post. Additionally, if there's a prominent system I haven't included, let me know and I'll revise to add it. I. Classic Call of Cthulhu and its near-variants: Call of Cthulhu – Utilizes a d100 percentile dice system called the Basic Roleplaying System, or BRP. Scenarios are usually set in the 1920s. Call of Cthulhu is currently on its 7th Edition, though the rules are very similar and scenarios can be easily converted across editions. Call of Cthulhu focuses on investigation, leaves plenty of room for failure, and has lethal combat. Characters will usually die or go insane. The gamemaster is called the keeper and characters are called investigators. Essential rulebook(s): Call of Cthulhu Keeper Rulebook, 7th Edition Free resource: Call of Cthulhu 7th Edition Quick-Start Rules There are several Call of Cthulhu modules that share an identical ruleset and gaming system to the usual Call of Cthulhu, but have special names to denote a special setting and a unique reference book to assist with roleplaying in that setting. These are: Cthulhu Invictus – Set in Ancient Rome (circa 100 AD). Essential rulebook(s): Cthulhu Invictus Cthulhu Dark Ages – Set during the Dark Ages (circa 1000 AD). Essential rulebook(s): Cthulhu Dark Ages Down Darker Trails – Set in the American Old West (circa late 1800s). Essential rulebook(s): Down Darker Trails Cthulhu by Gaslight – Set in 1890s Victorian England. Essential rulebook(s): Cthulhu by Gaslight Achtung! Cthulhu – Set during World War II, with investigators playing Allied agents fighting the Secret War against the Nazi Black Sun. Essential rulebook(s): Achtung! Cthulhu: Keeper's Guide to the Secret War Cthulhu Now – Set in modern times. Essential rulebook(s): Cthulhu Now H.P. Lovecraft's Dreamlands – Set in H.P. Lovecraft's Dreamlands, where investigators travel down the seven hundred steps, through the Gates of Deeper Slumber, and into the realm of dreams.  Essential rulebook(s): H.P. Lovecraft's Dreamlands  Punktown – Set in a cyberpunk future, where Lovecraft meets Blade Runner, The Fifth Element, and Total Recall. Essential rulebook(s): Punktown: A Setting Book for Call of Cthulhu and Basic Roleplaying Pulp Cthulhu – Utilizes a d100 BRP system similar to Call of Cthulhu, but with several unique rules. Scenarios are usually set in the 1930s. Pulp Cthulhu changes the game to turn the investigators into action heroes, similar to Indiana Jones, who are much less likely to die in combat and more equipped to fight the Cthulhu mythos directly. It has a pulpy, action/adventure tone. Essential rulebook(s): Pulp Cthulhu Trail of Cthulhu – Utilizes a mostly diceless points-based system (some limited use of d6) called the GUMSHOE System. Scenarios are usually set in the 1930s. The GUMSHOE System is designed for investigative roleplaying such that a failed dice roll cannot prevent the finding of a clue. Trail of Cthulhu emphasizes storytelling and interpreting clues, as opposed to roleplaying and gathering clues. Essential rulebook(s): Trail of Cthulhu rulebook Free resource: Trail of Cthulhu downloads and resources Cthulhu Confidential – Trail of Cthulhu designed for play with one gamemaster and one player. Essential rulebook(s): Cthulhu Confidential Cthulhu City – Trail of Cthulhu set in a New England overrun by the Cthulhu Mythos. Essential rulebook(s): Cthulhu City Delta Green – Utilizes a d100 BRP system similar to Call of Cthulhu, but with several unique rules. Scenarios are usually set in the 1990s or modern times. Delta Green presents a scenario in which characters are government agents investigating and combatting mythos elements, similar to The X-Files. It takes the investigative tone of Call of Cthulhu and adds an air of conspiracy and secret societies. The gamemaster is called the handler and characters are called agents. Essential rulebook(s): Delta Green: Agent’s Handbook Free resource: Delta Green: Need to Know quick-start rulebook The Fall of Delta Green – A Delta Green prequel that utilizes the mostly points-based GUMESHOE System used in Trail of Cthulhu. Scenarios are usually set in the 1960s. Essential rulebook(s): The Fall of Delta Green Dark Streets – Utilizes a d100 percentile dice system from Renaissance Deluxe, which takes its system from OpenQuest, which is based on BRP. Scenarios are set in 1750s London. Characters are members of London’s proto-police force. Dark Streets gameplay is very similar to traditional Call of Cthulhu, emphasizing investigation and deduction while keeping combat occasional and deadly. Essential rulebook(s): Dark Streets 2nd Edition - Core Rulebook Raiders of R’lyeh – Utilizes a d100 percentile dice system based on RuneQuest, a BRP system. Scenarios are set in 1900-1913. Characters are mercenary rogues exploring the frontiers of the known world. Closer to Pulp Cthulhu than traditional Call of Cthulhu, Raiders of R'lyeh looks to Robert E. Howard’s Mythos and Weird stories as an additional influence. Essential rulebook(s): Raiders of R’lyeh: Gamemaster’s Guide & Complete Rules GORE – Utilizes a d100 percentile dice system that is fairly rules-light and based on the Mongoose Runequest 1 Systems Reference Document, which is based on BRP. GORE stands for Generic Old-school Roleplaying Engine, and is designed to allow Lovecraftian adventures in science fiction, fantasy, investigative, and classical horror settings. Essential & free rulebook: GORE APOCTHULHU – Utilizes a d100 percentile dice system based on Mongoose's Legend RPG system, a BRP system. Scenarios are set in various post-apocalyptic landscapes following the reemergence of the Old Ones. Characters are called Survivors, who seek to investigate the horrors of their new reality in an effort to guarantee their community's survival, or maybe even to unearth secrets that can lead to the defeat of their Mythos overlords. Essential rulebook(s): APOCTHULHU RPG Core Rues II. Variants with a strong “rules-light” emphasis: Cthulhu Dark – Utilizes a d6, rules-light system. Loosely related to Trail of Cthulhu, with an emphasis on storytelling and the how of things rather than the whether of things. Maintains a focus on cosmic horror within a barebones rules environment. Essential rulebook(s): Cthulhu Dark hardcover rulebook Free resource: Cthulhu Dark: A Rules-Light System for Lovecraftian Horror Cthulhu Grey – Utilizes a d6, rules-light system closely based on Cthulhu Dark. Cthulhu Grey adds in a Harm stat, greater character differentiation, and rules for Magick. Essential & free rulebook: Cthulhu Grey: A Cthulhu Dark Hack Cthulhu Grim – Utilizes a d6, rules-light system closely based on Cthulhu Dark and Cthulhu Grey. Cthulhu Grim adopts rules specifically suited for campaign play. Essential & free rulebook: Cthulhu Grim, based on Cthulhu Dark and Cthulhu Grey Spiralis – Utilizes dice of multiple sizes in a rules-light system inspired by Cthulhu Dark and the Powered by the Apocalypse system. Tailored for mini-campaigns of 2-6 sessions. Essential rulebook(s): Spiralis - A Lovecraftian Roleplaying Game Free resource: Spiralis player rules and Investigator sheet Lovecraftesque – Utilizes a diceless, GMless system. Creates a GMless story of a lone character confronting cosmic horror in the form of a mystery that builds to a climax. Each playthrough will create a single one-shot scenario designed for completion in a single session. Players take on the roles of Narrator, Witness, and Watchers. Essential rulebook(s): Lovecraftesque rulebook Free resource: Lovecraftesque free references and handouts De Profundis – Utilizes a diceless, GMless, correspondence-based system. Players take turns writing letters in-character to one another in the style of H.P. Lovecraft. Includes an option for solo play. Essential rulebook(s): De Profundis Second Edition The Cthulhu Hack – Utilizes dice of multiple sizes in a rules-light system called The Black Hack. As a rules-light system, The Cthulhu Hack emphasizes storytelling and offers player-focused gameplay designed for quick and easy pick-up play. Essential rulebook(s): The Cthulhu Hack rulebook Free-ish (PWYW) resource: The Cthulhu Hack: Quickstart Eldritch Tales – Utilizes dice of multiple sizes (primarily d20) in a fairly rules-light system modeled on old-school games. Applies an old-school sword & sorcery RPG approach to Cthulhu settings. Essential rulebook(s): Eldritch Tales: Lovecraftian White Box Role-Playing tremulus – Utilizes a d6 system that is fairly rules-light called Powered by the Apocalypse. tremulus is a storytelling-first game that requires limited prep and emphasizes investigation and survival. Essential rulebook(s): tremulus rulebook Mythos World – Utilizes the fairly rules-light d6 Powered by the Apocalypse system. Mythos World is specifically designed to apply the Powered by the Apocalypse system to 1920s roleplaying. Essential rulebook(s): Mythos World Free resources: Profession Playbooks and Basic Player Moves Cthulhu Abides – Utilizes a d6 “poker dice” system that is fairly rules-light and similar to a system called The Whispering Vault. Scenarios are generally set in 1920s Britain. Cthulhu Abides is designed to be heavier than Cthulhu Dark, with greater character differentiation, while still lighter than Call of Cthulhu and Trail of Cthulhu. Intended as a Pick Up & Play RPG. Essential rulebook(s): Cthulhu Abides: A Roleplaying Game of Investigation & Madness Free resource: Cthulhu Abides: A Roleplaying Game of Investigation & Madness (PDF) Unnamable – Utilizes a d6, rules-light system. Unnamable greatly simplifies skill checks so that character descriptors, personality traits, and descriptions rather than ranked skills are used for skill checks. It also preserves character sanity to a greater degree than Cthulhu Dark. Essential & free rulebook: Unnamable: A Little Lovecraft Game Unspeakable – Utilizes a d6, rules-light system closely based on Unnamable. Unspeakable adds a bit more character differentiation as well as increases the risk of character insanity. Essential rulebook(s): Curse of the Yellow Sign Collected Tiny Cthulhu – Utilizes a d6, rules-light system called TinyD6. Set in any era, with options that include fantasy, superheroes, and a science fiction future, Tiny Cthulhu features investigators defending the world from the dark powers of cthonic entities. Essential rulebook(s): Tiny Cthulhu III. Adaptations intended to bring Cthulhu roleplaying into other RPG universes: Call of Cthulhu d20 – Utilizes the d20-based system of Dungeons & Dragons, 3.5 edition. It was created to maintain the feel of the original Call of Cthulhu, but using a dice system that would be more familiar to Dungeons & Dragons players and which could allow for the porting of characters, monsters, and other content between the two universes. Currently out of print. Essential rulebook(s): Call of Cthulhu d20 edition rulebook Sandy Petersen's Cthulhu Mythos for 5E – Utilizes the d20-based system of Dungeons & Dragons, 5th edition. Sandy Peterson's Cthulhu Mythos is designed to allow Cthulhu roleplaying within the most recent implementation of the Dungeons & Dragons universe and system. Essential rulebook(s): Sandy Petersen's Cthulhu Mythos (5E) + D&D Dungeon Master's Guide + D&D Monster Manual + D&D Player's Handbook Sandy Petersen’s Cthulhu Mythos for Pathfinder – Utilizes the d20-based system of Pathfinder. Sandy Petersen’s Cthulhu Mythos is designed to allow Cthulhu roleplaying within the Pathfinder universe and system. Essential rulebook(s): Sandy Petersen’s Cthulhu Mythos (PF) + Pathfinder Roleplaying Game Core Rulebook World of Cthulhu – Utilizes the d10 system of World of Darkness called the Storyteller System. World of Cthulhu is designed to allow Cthulhu roleplaying within the World of Darkness universe and system. Essential rulebook(s): World of Cthulhu: Lovecraftian Roleplay in the World of Darkness (free) + New World of Darkness Rulebook (1st edition) Cthulhu Pulp: Tales from Beyond Pulp – Utilizes the d20 system of Pulp Adventure. Designed to allow Cthulhu roleplaying within the Pulp Adventure system, with a focus on using super-science and muscle to fight the forces of the Cthulhu Mythos. Out of print. Essential rulebook(s): Pulp Adventure, Second Edition: Cthulhu Pulp: Tales from Beyond Pulp IV. Other variant systems: Cthulhu Live – Utilizes a points-based live action roleplaying (LARP) system with no randomizer. Aims to stay true to the feel of Call of Cthulhu, where investigators are flesh-and-blood humans and violence is consequential. Essential rulebook(s): Cthulhu Live 3rd Edition (LARP) Realms of Cthulhu – Utilizes dice of multiple sizes in a fairly rules-light system called Savage Worlds. Realms of Cthulhu remains investigative in nature but incorporates a faster pace and more action, along with the addition of Combat Magic. Essential rulebook(s): Realms of Cthulhu rulebook + Savage Worlds Adventure Edition Shadows of Cthulhu – Utilizes a d20 system called True20. Scenarios are usually set in the 1920s. Shadows of Cthulhu presents an experience similar to Call of Cthulhu d20, but with a higher degree of action/pulp and while utilizing the True20 system, intended to provide a d20-based system that requires no other kinds of dice and minimizes the need for tracking things like hit points. Essential rulebook(s): Shadows of Cthulhu + True20 Adventure Roleplaying, Revised Edition Nemesis– Utilizes a d10 dice-pool system called One-Roll Engine. Nemesis focuses on dark horror inspired by Lovecraftian themes and utilizes a Madness Meter to simulate insanity and mental trauma. Free & essential rulebook: Nemesis: Roleplaying in Worlds of Horror Silent Legions – Utilizes a d20 system based on Stars Without Number. Scenarios are usually set in modern times, and while inspired by Lovecraft, includes tools for gamemasters to create their own gods, monsters, cults, and more. The rulebook is intended as a creation toolkit focused on sandbox adventures. Essential rulebook(s): Silent Legions V. Cthulhu-adjacent games with their own unique tone: Cthulhu Risus – Utilizes a d6, rules-light system called Risus. Cthulhu Risus offers a fast-paced and humorous take on Lovecraftian horror. Essential & free rulebook: Cthulhu Risus CthulhuTech – Utilizes a d10 dice pool “poker dice” system called Framewerk. Scenarios are set during the Aeon War in 2085. CthulhuTech blends Lovecraftian horror with anime-style mecha, sci-fi, and magic. For mature audiences only. Essential rulebook(s): CthulhuTech Core Book Free resource: CthulhuTech V2: The Shadow War Open Beta Cthulhu for President – Utilizes a d6 system called the BEER Engine. Cthulhu for President offers tongue-in-cheek humor as players take on the role of Elder Party staffers in an attempt to get their Great Old One elected. Essential rulebook(s): Cthulhu for President: The Game Fantasy Cthulhu – Utilizes the custom dice (d6) system of FATE. Fantasy Cthulhu places the Cthulhu mythos within a fantasy setting powered by the FATE system. Essential rulebook(s): Fantasy Cthulhu powered by FATE Core Post-Cthulhu – Utilizes a custom dice (d6) system called FATE. Scenarios are set in the future, after Cthulhu has risen. Players take on the role of survivors of the Cataclysm who wander a post-apocalyptic landscape stalked by Lovecraftian monsters. Essential rulebook(s): Post-Cthulhu FATE of Cthulhu – Utilizes a custom dice (d6) system called FATE. Scenarios are set in the present day, with characters who are time-travelers from a dark future in which the Great Old Ones have returned. FATE of Cthulhu sets Lovecraftian horror against a Terminator-like backdrop. Essential rulebook(s): Fate of Cthulhu Eldritch Skies – Utilizes dice of multiple sizes in the fairly rules-light Savage Worlds system. Set in an alternate timeline where the Miskatonic Antarctic Expedition found the elder ones' city in 1931 and humanity reached Mars in 1958 and discovered lightspeed travel in 1994. Essential rulebook(s): Eldritch Skies + Savage Worlds Adventure Edition GURPS CthulhuPunk – Utilizes a 3d6 system called the Generic Universal RolePlaying System, or GURPS. Set in a Cthulhu Mythos-cyberpunk mashup where investigators have supercomputers, cyborg bodies, and deadly new hand weapons, but society has broken down, giving Mythos entities new breeding grounds for corruption and decay. Currently out of print. Essential rulebook(s): CthulhuPunk: Ancient Horror Crawls into the Dark Future + The GURPS Basic Set, 4th Edition
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  7. You think you are having problems, I keep making dupe topics, sigh...
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  8. Nice to be back to running games again Chaos Crew!!! @MOB@Jeff@Scotty@Rick Meintset al. Thanx for making this possible before I died ( I was getting worried back at the turn of the millennium). Now, I just gots ta gets me a game! Oh well, one thing at a time. Ohh, playing ol skool RG 3 games with a brand new RQG chassis, and having a great time! Très cool!
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  9. A long time ago a group of players went from Sartar to Esrolia and i invented a route that included a path through the Shadow Plateau. The characters followed a stream that vanished in the north eastern platrt in a big crack in the Shadow Plateau, and that stream flowed followig tunnels through the Shadow Plateau and finally came out on the fast western end of the Shadow Plateau. The characters were on bord of a very small boat, and their ride was inspired by "Indiana Jones and the Temple of Doom". I haven´t looked up if this route would be of use for you, but it was very good MGF anyway.
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  10. I just love the look of this Starter set. Cover choice for the box is just gorgeous! That’s a lovely painting. Really captures and updates the vibe of RQ2. You’ve absolutely nailed it! 👏
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  11. Just to complicate matters: Is there a goddess attached to domesticated ducks (NOT Durulz!)?
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  12. A very adaptable and tasty stage... MUCH better than the stringy Breaked 'newt!
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  13. Another for the List - "Punktown - A Setting Book for Call of Cthulhu and Basic Roleplaying". Was the last thing done by Miskatonic River Press I believe. PDF still available for purchase, not sure about physical copies.
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  14. they are very early stage Dragonewts surely...
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  15. Yep. That's how I read it too. I think that the Morokanth probably eat more meat than just holy day practices, but I really could see a Heortling or Esrolian completely lose their shit watching a herd-man get rendered down in its usable parts... leather hides, tendons for glue and bindings, fats boiled into waterproofing, etc. And for the record, herd-men are completely herbivorous.
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  16. I believe the morokanth diet is the same as the other Praxian tribes but heavily slanted to the vegetarian option. I quote: The morokanth are primarily vegetarians but do eat herd-men as part of their religious practice. — RuneQuest Glorantha Bestiary, p.51
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  17. Ah, as I say, I could go on. A number of us worked out the ramifications and requirements of Ringworld Glorantha in 1980-ish, and the physics still holds together, as far as I know. (Others in the group being the physicists, not me!) One simply needs another new level of bizarre rationalisations every five years or so. Almost like being Gregged.... However, I wasn't being serious, so don't be concerned about the maniac in the corner. 🤪
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  18. The main trade route to Tarsh is via Alda-Chur and then on to Slave Wall and then Furthest.
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  19. The first will support wagons and mules all the way to Karse. You really won't be able to use wagons on either of the latter two. The second & third require mules for the journey to Beast Valley or Duck Point. The second could support switching to boat once you reach navigable waters of the Creek-Stream River and taking boats downriver to Valadon (and ultimately Nochet), though some portaging might be required.
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  20. Yes the lips were quite soft. The one I met certainly did. And carrots. He really liked carrots.
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  21. Only the Triceratops Queen "herds" dinosaurs.
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  22. I forget the reference but I recall Greg saying that most Praxian Beast Rider animals' preferred grazing was on different plants in the same grazing area. Bison preferred one layer of the grazing, sables another. So while they would need to keep the herds separate for coup-counting purposes, two tribes could graze one immediately one the other. Certain sacred places [the Paps and Hidden Greens mostly] were blessed by Eiritha's mother, Ernalda, with thicker growth in the appropriate seasons to support the presence of the tribes during Holy Days and Sacred Time. It's not hard to accept this, as getting hyper realistic about it eff's up the fantasy environment you're trying to create and game in. The important part in all this is consistency from the referee. Explain [or write up] the Gloranthan ecology for that particular beast, let the players know, and be consistent. Give the players some input, be flexible, and be consistent with rulings and there should be no problems with mixing Earth Prime facts with Gloranthan fantasy.
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  23. Easiest route is to go to Quackford and then head to Wilmskirk, which takes another day. From there you take the King's Road south to Karse, which takes about 5 days. From Karse you can get a boat across the Mirrorsea Bay. So you be able to do it in about a week. That route has good roads the whole way - and Sartarite royal roads from Whitewall to Quackford, complete with inns and places to rest and feed and water mounts.
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  24. Sorry, Ringworld Glorantha would be a Sunstop variety. Ringworld doesn't know sunrises and sunsets. Neither would the firmament work... The Gloranthan firmament is viewed like from a planet's pole, while the Gloranthan planets and the sun are moving as viewed from an equatorial position on an (approximately spherical) planet. The observable sun only works as a planetary object.
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  25. Rhinos aren't ruminants, but rather closer related to tapirs and equines as perissodactyla. Thus they only have one stomach, as opposed to the ruminants' four. Whales are or at least used to be ruminants... Praxian rhinos appear to be closet to the Indian variant than the two African ones. Indian rhinos appear to be opportunistic grazers (like African white rhinos) rather than browsers (like African black rhinos or tapirs), from what I could find. The African White Rhinos (also grazers rather than browsers) were said to be the "most social of all rhinos" - probably tolerating other rhinos in 10 m distance, or something like that. Praxian one-horned rhinos apparently are more social than that in allowing their riders to form rather closed charges with maybe a meter between the charging steeds. We already have two browser species among the Praxian quadrupeds with the high llamas and the morokanth. I don't see the point to have the rhinos push into that already quite overcrowded ecological niche if they can be opportunistic grazers. Still preferring greens to yellowed stalks, but able to take in the main growth of the chaparral. Do the Beast Riders practice fire farming to get at these fresh greens? Other than the impalas (ironically the tribe with the fire association), few Praxian quadrupeds thrive on dried out grass. Fire farming would open the earth for new, lusher growth, at least while there is enough water.
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  26. I was a young enlisted man serving in the US Army in Germany when the Twilight: 2000 game came out way back when rocks were still soft and fire was this new hippie thing that would never catch on. The game became instantly popular in the barracks for several reasons, but the main one was that we had all the toys immediately to hand or knew somebody we could ask about them. I mean, our wall lockers had our helmets, web gear, and 'go' bags on top of them. The motor pool was full of M1 tanks, a Bradley IFV or two, and other bit of military mayhem machines. But this was also the age Rambo and Chuck Norris movies. At every table there was that 'one guy' whose characters always carried an SMG, a M16 /203 [an M16 with a 40mm grenade launcher under the barrel] AND a sniper rifle and believed down to the bottom of his soul that could wear a flack vest, a full rucksack, and every piece of ironmongery he owned and STILL jump through a window, execute a combat roll, and come up ready to fire an 'aimed shot'. After awhile it got to be a real pain in the ass to argue with guys like this every week. Then the GM [my buddy Russ] came up with a solution that was not only elegant, but freaking hysterical as well.... He instituted the Get Your Shit On Rule, or GYSOR. If Joe Knucklehead wanted his character to do some seriously Dolph Lundgren type ninja-hero shit, he would be challenged to Get His Shit On. This meant that he had to go to his wall locker and put on his helmet, flack vest, and his 'go' bag rucksack and do something physically challenging. Examples included jumping over a chair without tripping and falling, or running up and down the barracks stairs 3 times and then writing his General Orders legibly, or something similar. If Joe Knucklehead successfully completed said maneuver, then the Uncaring Buddha of War smiled upon Joe's character and whatever idiotic stunt Joe previously described was executed to perfection. If Joe failed in the task, his stupid idea failed... spectacularly. The only single guarantee was that the character wouldn't out-and-out die. I hope you all enjoyed my little trip [pun intended] down memory lane, and I highly recommend such a rule when you have such a person at the table.
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  27. This is the fulcrum, dare I say the spearpoint our differences balance on. I do ask my players to be on the cusp of believably, but sometimes I wonder if I am missing the point. Why should my poor victims learn to act like real soldiers (as postulated in another thread, surely we can spare them that horror) If they wish to do the stupid and inexplicable and then pull it off with impossible die rolls are they not the beneficiaries of an experience worthy of Chuck Jones! Is this not closer to a game then how did you put it, “a Donner Party Death March every freaking week.” Yep, that says a lot. On this point I find the “spearpoint” tipping me into your court. I said that earlier, explore away, and have a ball doing so. I do! Should you learn something as well, fantastic. I just figure it should not be a chore, so it should not be a task one should undertake.. a rule or axiom or that one should even aspire to it. But, if that rabbit hole should yield treasures, bonus! There we go, total agreement! I have always said that analogies always break, the good ones break later!
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  28. Re. "Your Merchant Will Vary": As a guideline, the merchant's % markup on price should vary with (A) Expected speed of turn-over of the item (B) Overhead cost of keeping the item, (C) The size of the market the merchant is in. Examples: (A) If the merchant is selling carrots in accord with French Desperate Windchild's example, I judge that he expects this stock to turn over in a week, probably on market day. (If it doesn't the carrots will be dried up and less saleable.) If he maintains a stock of all goods worth 600L, and is in local trade only (and not selling in Sacred Time), then each week to break even on a Free Standard of Living(60L) he only needs to make a profit of 1/40th of that or 15L, = 2.5%, without accounting for compounding on his rate of return. But If you account for compounding then a 0.3% margin will provide that. [1.003^40 = 1.127 so he actually needs a hair less margin, but let's deal in round numbers here.] That is AFTER and in addition to margin for overhead and risk. On the other hand if your merchant expects to have to keep the goods on hand for a year before it sells, then he needs a 10% margin to break even on a Free Standard of Living(60L). Our matrix will probably not sell as fast as carrots. If the merchant expects it to sit in his house for a year then the margin should be 10% before item (B), overhead. (B) Overhead cost: This is the fee for selling in a market, or the cost of maintaining a shop. Plus any guards, caravan animals etc. Clearly overhead can be significant if your goods need a guard or if you run a caravan. Bronze Age through Medieval Real world merchants' homes would also be their shops, YGMV, but applied to the merchant's assumed stock of 600L, a house would seem to be included in the Standard Of Living for a merchant operating in a fixed location. The book has no standard cost on renting a whole house, only costs for inns. (p.413) - but presumably rent on an average house would not be greater than a year's entire Free SOL of 60L which covers an entire household. Presumably this would also vary between rural and urban areas. This is worth its own discussion thread. A local merchant might keep an item as valuable as a matrix on his own body, so would not necessarily employ a guard for it. He might expect a return on use of the Rune spell "Lock", though, if he kept it in a strongbox. So the merchant's fee for selling in the local market would seem to be the significant cost here. YGMV for that fee. But the local Issaries priest expects fees to cover maintaining the market and to contribute to his own SOL. So market fee setting would seem to be a significant part of the merchant's mark-up. This is worth its own discussion thread. For a traveling merchant overhead cost is obviously higher. To the extent that he stays in inns or caravanserais, if the private-room rate of 5L per day applies (even if his whole group sleeps in that room), that will be a major increase in overhead. If the 'dormitory' rate of 3c applies then a whole caravan can sleep cheaper than that. And animal, wagons - those things don't last for ever, depreciate, and may be casualties of violence or accident on the road. (C) The size of the market: This is "place of transaction" that Shiningbrow refers to: Big cities have more customers, and more rich customers, and so will support a higher rate of turn-over of the merchant's stock. Given competition that should drive the merchant's margins down. In a distant village maybe only the Chief and Ring would be customers for our merchant's matrix, and if they don't buy it our matrix may sit for years, so the merchant should hang on to the matrix there only if he expects to soak an eventual buyer like an adventurer wandering through. Selling in the local market on market day provides more customers, because people come from the countryside and other villages and also traders roaming the roads. That is what makes it worth while to pay the market fee, it's a trade-off with rate of turn-over of the merchant's stock of goods. It's also a fee for entry to the area at all: In a distant village the ring might object to a merchant just setting up his own market on the edge of town. But in Nochet there may be a thousand potential customers, and our matrix may sell in a week or a season. So larger places give quicker turn-over and therefore the mark-up that a merchant needs will be less. Based on all this, I object to a single rule of thumb on mark-up in matrix sales and urge adjusting to circumstances based on expected rate of turnover, overhead, and the size of the market.
    1 point
  29. Both of the books you asked about, the Weapons & Equipment Guide and the GameMaster book, have not gone to layout yet. The Weapons & Equipment book is almost ready to go to layout. That is the most accurate status we can provide. There is a very good chance the PDF for the weapons & equipment guide will be available in a few months. We can provide a better date for the printed version of it once it has gone to the printers.
    1 point
  30. Just bear in mind...
    1 point
  31. I'm selling some original Glorantha artwork, which I painted for the first Six Ages game. (If interested you can comment, PM or email me: JanPospisil42 AT gmail.com) I can't currently sell to UK-based folk. (If you're wondering - it's because the post-Brexit VAT/import of goods rules are mega confusing and unclear. I suppose if you can organize a non-UK proxy, that'd work.) See all available pieces here: https://drive.google.com/drive/folders/1UxBW4oUXeJs1pD2XsvmLkdAIosh7hAkq?usp=sharing
    1 point
  32. I have to say I’m excited by a pulp scenario collection. I thought the scenarios included in the main book were some of the best I’ve read before. When I first started playing CoC I was disappointed there weren’t more big meaty campaigns like I was used to from D&D but I’ve come to appreciate them more and more as I’ve been running a game and they are now my favourite part of the line. Also wooooo for gaslight being relatively soon! I’m assuming the writing being over means it goes into art commissioning and then after that layout? I’m British and my investigators all want to try Victorian England out but I was waiting for the 7e book before jumping in. I’ve been spoilt with the production quality of the 7e line.
    1 point
  33. "The innocent" ??? Sir, I categorically deny your scurrilous and baseless accusations! *I* sir, am no innocent !!!
    1 point
  34. More about the Great House, the Faro Wheel, the Pharaoh/oah*, and Belintar breaking the bank in this thread: *long ago in my undergrad university days – back when the work we submitted was handwritten, and if you wanted to check your spelling, you had to look it up in a damn dictionary – I got a distinction for an essay about ancient Egypt. When handing it back to me the lecturer said it really deserved a high distinction, but for the fact I'd used three different spellings for Pharaoh throughout, and all wrong.
    1 point
  35. The Great House – the original manor of Talar Barat - is a two story round building in the centre of Casin Town. It houses the Faro Wheel, the strange artifact the Talar retrieved from the Clanking Ruins. Because wagers on the Faro Wheel can be made with intangible concepts (runic affinities, mana, life-force, perception etc), Ingareen statisticians have long disputed what the Great House’s house edge actually is. But it is said Talar Barat’s beard turned gray that day Belintar "broke the bank" on the Faro Wheel.
    1 point
  36. Refer to your nearest flat-Earth pundit for their latest theory. I have a fondness for one propounded at a recent conference, that the world is flying upwards. 🤣
    1 point
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