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  1. By Homeland. And there are breakdowns for: Sartar Grazelands Old tarsh Lunar Tarsh Caladraland Esrolia Heortland Rightarm Islands Dital God Forgot Bison Tribe High Llama tribe Pol-Joni Impala Tribe Sable Tribe Morokanth Rhino Tribe Zebra Tribe Unicorn Tribe Aggar Holay Vanch Imther Darjiin Doblian First Blessed Karasal Kostaddi Oraya Oronin Silver Shadow Sylila West Reaches AND For: Brown Elves Green Elves Yellow Elves Dagori Inkarth Shadow Plateau/Troll Woods Elder Wilds Halikiv Yolp Blue Moon Plateau Mistress Race (anywhere) Trollkin (anywhere)
    19 points
  2. System-wise, there are distinct similarities: Same characteristics - 3-18 range Hit Points per Location Percentile Skills Passions Cults Detailed Combat Lower & Higher Magic forms Creatures with full stats, so playable as characters within reason and some bounds But there are differences within the common elements. Mythras differs here: No General Hit Points Mythras uses Luck Points and Action Points Skill values based on sum of two characteristics (or a single characteristic x2) Different spread and handling of skills: Crits on 1/10th skill value, no Special Success, no Resistance Table Passions augment skills without having to roll, and don't risk reducing a skill if failed Combat takes a very different approach to resolution with a lot more tactical options and the use of Special Effects No Strike Ranks - Mythras uses weapon size and reach instead Magic works very differently. Five systems: Folk Magic, Animism, Theism, Mysticism and Sorcery - all fully detailed, but with different approaches and effects Another underlying difference that may not be so evident is the design philosophy behind the Mythras rules. It's not based on RQ2 to the same extent as RQ:G, and therefore a lot design choices and decisions move away from design decisions that underpin RQ2 (such as the Resistance Table). But the two games have a common heritage and thus a lot in common. Mythras is a toolkit that requires some thought from the GM, whereas RQ:G is tied to Glorantha and thus has that consistent reference point throughout. As David Scott suggests, take a look at Mythras Imperative which gives you a very good idea of the system, and showcases the differences I've outlined above.
    17 points
  3. Chaosium, publisher of the Call of Cthulhu tabletop roleplaying game, has acquired The Dhole's House website, a free 'online toolkit' for both Keepers and players of Call of Cthulhu. Users of The Dhole's House are able to create Investigators that are fully compatible with Call of Cthulhu 7th edition and print off a PDF character sheet, all in a matter of minutes. All Investigators are saved and can be updated via the 'Character Control Panel' as the campaign unfolds. Users can also contribute to a Character Library, allowing anyone to download PDF character sheets for Call of Cthulhu investigators for use as PCs or NPC's. The Keeper section of the Library includes a handout generator for quick creation of in-game artefacts including three different types of telegram, visiting/business cards, newspaper clippings and calendars. The Dhole's House was created as a fan site by Lee Carnell in 2016, and has become a popular resource for Call of Cthulhu Keepers and players world-wide, with many thousands of Investigators and handouts created every month. As part of the acquisition, Lee has joined Chaosium as an in-house software developer. "The fact that Chaosium nows owns The Dhole's House will make no noticeable difference for existing users of the site. With Lee, we plan to keep improving the features and functionality of the resource for the benefit of Call of Cthulhu gamers," said Chaosium vice president Michael O'Brien.
    15 points
  4. We have ZERO interest in releasing a pdf of the Cults or any other book without the art. The art is a key part of the book. I don't mind selling a limited numbers of draft manuscripts at a special convention, but that's about it.
    13 points
  5. 12 points
  6. Surprise! 😉 Thanks to @MOB and @Dustin O'Chaosium for making this preview possible! You can subscribe to RPG Imaginings if you'd like!
    11 points
  7. Available now from the Jonstown Compendium: BLACK SPEAR, by Nick Brooke & Mike O'Connor. 181 pages for $19.95 in digital (PDF) format. "Know then, oh Prince, that in the Sea Season after the Battle of the Queens was Colymar's Black Spear sent forth to rouse Argrath from his slumbers..." An epic saga of the Hero Wars, festooned with heroquests and deep Gloranthan weirdness. Probably the strangest thing I’ve ever written. Designed as a follow-up to The Duel at Dangerford, but it also works as a stand-alone mini-campaign. Canonically set in Sea Season 1627, with suggestions at the back of the book for changing things around. Illustrated lavishly by Mike O’Connor: 50+ pictures, one or two songs, some poetry, not many stat-blocks.
    9 points
  8. Here's the thing: just about every culture in Glorantha could be the "bad guys." Or the "good guys." It all depends on your perspective. Trolls, Orlanthi, Praxians, Lunars, Pentans, Telmori, Char-Un: you name it, they're all seen as irredeemable villains by various other folk, who know them only as enemies and don't share their sane and reasonable world-view. And it's also perfectly possible to play games with any of them as heroes, doing good things in a culturally-appropriate manner. The traditional exceptions are the Creatures of Chaos (broo, scorpion men, ogres, etc.) plus a few specially-designated Enemy Kingdoms from the old Orange Box (off the top of my head, that was just the Vadeli and the Kingdom of War). I suppose another set of exceptions would include peoples seen as too weak to be dangerous: Oasis Folk, Boat People, Ergeshi, Baboons, Ducks, Trollkin and their ilk. Picking on them only makes you look petty and vindictive. (And maybe you are? Who knows!)
    9 points
  9. As always, please use or not use whatever you want to use in your game, including not using Glorantha at all. I don't really see "Howard the Duck" as being in Glorantha because that specific character isn't in Glorantha, nor is Daffy or Donald. There is a race of creatures in Glorantha called ducks/durulz, and while a lot of jokes have been made about them, when it comes down to how they are used or not used in play is up to you and the other players. My general experience is that anything or anybody can be portrayed in a silly manner. I've had players try to use a Donald Duck voice and I've told them they are lessening my enjoyment of the game. If they insist on continuing down that road then I wouldn't continue playing with them. Why would I continue playing with anyone who places a higher value on annoying me than making the game enjoyable for me. As for Jack O'Bears, I personally think they are fine as they are. Sure, they were added to the game because Archive minis had a miniature already in production that they could relabel as a gloranthan creature as soon as Greg told them what name to use. Like all chaos creatures, they are pretty much a "break the expected norms" sort of creature because that's how chaos works. How close to an actual pumpkin their heads are is up to you. I personally find them very creepy, scary, dangerous, and lethal. As for Morokanth, having them be vegetarians or meat eaters is such an easy adjustment to make. I personally see them as eating meat, but have no problems if others don't see them that way. I feel Morokanth can also process vegetation better than people can, so they kind of have the best of both worlds when it comes to being able to eat whatever is most available to eat. Since a Herd man probably has less meat on them than a bison or many of the other beasts of Prax I think most of the time the morokanth have an easier time finding vegetation to eat than meat. They probably don't eat a lot of other Praxian beasts because they already have a bad enough relationship with the other tribes and probably find trading the beasts with other tribes as more worth their while. I don't tend to think that deeply about whether any fantasy creation makes total sense, though. That's just not my thing.
    8 points
  10. Over current history, Sarostip Cold-Eye likely casts the greatest shadow over the tribe. A member of the High Council, leader of the Humakt Regiment and member of the Household of Death, and killer of Prince Temertain, he's like a demigod character from the Mahabharata ("my sworn cousin is king of a tribe and a thousand warriors come with her"). He could easily have been king, but instead walked the edge of the sword, earning great respect (and fear). His cousin Amalda is king in her own right, but worshipful of Sarostip. The tribe surrendered to Fazzur Wideread as Starbrow's Rebellion collapsed and she remained loyal to her father's oath. As a result, the tribe was neutral during the Lunar Occupation, not aiding the empire but not opposing it either. The tribe received two clans from the Colymar after Starbrow's Rebellion, which is a source of bad blood between the tribes, exacerbated by the long running feud between the Varmanid and Orleving clans. That's probably exactly what the clever Gordius Silverus intended.
    8 points
  11. The terms "active" and "passive" get thrown around in this discussion so many different ways, I can no longer follow it. Ernalda is the Earth Goddess, and much of her activity involves bringing new life into the world, choosing useful consorts, and being the mother-ruler of the Earth deities and spirits. She is not a fighting god, being one of the forces of life in the Gods War, but she has plenty of children, relatives, and lovers who will do her fighting for her - not the least being Aldrya, Babeester Gor, and Maran Gor. Babeester Gor and Maran Gor are often seen as aspects of Ernalda, like Parvati and Kali and Durga. Orlanth is the Storm God, and much of his activity involves rushing around the world with violence and thunder. Orlanth destroys, Ernalda restores. That's the cycle - like Shiva and Shakti/Parvati, Yin and Yang, and so on. Sometimes the Orlanthi call this active/passive and gender these forces masculine/feminine, but of course like anything mythological, things are not so clear-cut.
    8 points
  12. Uz might not use the same framework as humans, with the dark-light polarity. They could just as easily use hot-cold, with the result that an Arkati becomes "Really Cool" or "Chilled".😁
    8 points
  13. Out now in PDF* A Time to Harvest: Death and Discovery in the Vermont Hills! In 1929, a student died during an expedition in the Vermont Hills. One year later, the Miskatonic University sent another team on the same expedition… It's time to harvest. Set in the picturesque state of Vermont at the beginning of the 1930s, A TIME TO HARVEST is a six part campaign, compatible with both Call of Cthulhu and Pulp Cthulhu rules. *buy the PDF direct from Chaosium.com now and we will send you a discount coupon just before the physical book goes on sale to offset the PDF purchase price you have already paid. The full color hardback will be out in early 2022, but why wait? A Time to Harvest is also available in PDF at DriveThruRPG.
    8 points
  14. A key thing contextually here is as emphatically as Jeff is stating things as being the way they are now, they also non-trivially contradict things he wrote years ago in products that were still in the regular catalog earlier this year (as opposed to the explicitly deuterocannonical Vault) and were referenced on glorantha.com as works upon which future Glorantha products would be built until fairly recently. (And the still-on-sale Guide is more congruent with the HQ2/G materials than it is with some of these more recently presented perspectives.) Now, Jeff & the rest have every right to make changes to the product line(s) that reflect their evolving tastes and perspectives on such matters as they deem fit. That's entirely legitimate. Let's not pretend though that they weren't also selling Sartar - Kingdom of Heroes at full-price concurrently with the new RQG stuff, which you that in Sartar the Yelmalio cult has 3000 Initiate and up members, while the Elmal and Redalda cults have 1000 each. Similarly, a Guide to Glorantha bought today still lists the Sun god in the Orlanthi pantheon as Elmal, and that his Runes are Truth and Fire. That's a different picture than the new messaging paints. It's not just that YGWV. Chaosium/Moon Design has/had multiple varying Gloranthas on offer as well, concurrently, and that when they have previously said, "I know things were a bit all over the map at times in the past, but here are the works we will reference going forward in new products..." there was an unwritten "...until we change our minds again." Once you walk something like that back the very concept of a canonical point of reference gets a bit squishy. Again, they can and should change things if they think it's the best move for whatever reason, (even if I don't like it, lol) but the more often they do the more limited any pronouncements of "this is how it is" become.
    8 points
  15. I wrote a blog post about the Creature I created and unleased on my players this past week, for our Runequest game. Spirit of Lost in the Dark
    7 points
  16. In the wake of Dragonrise the two Lunar regiments that had been stationed in Duck Valley have made a tactical withdrawal to Duckpoint leaving a power vacuum behind them. Meanwhile the adventurers are escorting a merchant and his cargo of metal ingots from Dwarf Mine to Man Vill in Beast Valley. Andrew Logan Montgomery calls this "a thoroughly classic adventure" in his insightful review see https://andrewloganmontgomery.blogspot.com/2021/10/bad-day-at-duck-rock-jonstown.html Available on the Jonstown Compendium here https://tinyurl.com/crhhuvxt
    7 points
  17. With Pavis and Big Rubble sets passing through the shop, I made a post today introducing these classic Runequest boxes to a wider D&D audience. They really are a pair, and I love that Chaosium graphically matched the sets. More photos over at my blog post. -Wayne PAVIS & BIG RUBBLE (1983): Basecamp and Vast City Ruins for Runequest RPG
    7 points
  18. By David Larkins, Pendragon line editor. A new edition of the Pendragon RPG is coming! The intention of this series of design journals by Pendragon line editor David Larkins is to trace the path of development, starting in the early 1980s and culminating with the forthcoming new edition of the Pendragon RPG, which will be first to be wholly published by Chaosium in a quarter-century. Pendragon Design Journal #1: Where It All Began The path to the forthcoming 6th edition of Pendragon formally began on April 5th, 2010, when Greg Stafford sent out an email to his team of collaborators (whom he referred to as his “Household”) outlining his vision for the new edition—his Ultimate Edition. Here is how Greg's fateful email began, in part: My Fellows, Thank you for accepting my offer to help out on the new King Arthur Pendragon 6th edition, and its supplements. Yes, that is correct. I plan to release a new edition of KAP. The core book and game, the “real” KAP, is about adventuring knights…. The innovations and changes will actually be few in number…. My desire is to have a set of rules that provides everything that a player needs to play an adventuring knight, unencumbered by anything but his goals and passions…. Now, one thing is that I want to be sure that the core game functions of itself, and also anticipates all of the below…. Greg then goes on for several pages, outlining his tentative plan for the sixth edition line. Looking over this today, it is striking to see how, even though the particulars changed quite a bit in the development, the central vision has remained essentially unaltered over the past ten years. Greg’s desire to make the core rules into a focused resource for playing adventuring knights and build out from there remains a key facet of Chaosium’s vision for the products to come. The key word is modularity: start with the adventuring knight and add other facets to the game to taste. (I will talk more about how we intend to realize this vision in future Design Journals.) As reviewed in last month’s installment, Greg first started to work on what he would come to call his magnum opus in the early 1980s by conducting a close reading of Malory’s Le Morte d’Arthur and other Arthurian texts and then adapting the Basic Roleplaying system around his notes. Four editions of the game would follow (plus a phantom “2nd edition” that was never actually published). Each edition saw tweaks and changes based on Greg’s evolving understanding of the literature and how he wished to represent it in the mechanics and setting of Pendragon. For sixth edition, Greg’s objective was to consolidate all that work into a coherent whole, one that reflected his latest understanding of what the game should be, which he achieved with the completed first draft of the rules shortly before his passing in 2018. It is notable, for example, that the game’s subtitle evolved from first edition’s “Game of Quest, Romance, & Adventure” to sixth edition’s “Game of Valor, Honor, & Tragedy”. This is not to say that there is no room for questing, romance, or adventure in the new edition—far from it! But over time, Greg came to understand that the mechanics and setting of Pendragon tend to produce gaming experiences of a much deeper, emotional timbre. Characters are tested. Some show Valor in the face of despair. Some hold to Honor when all else is lost. Yet, as we all know, Arthur’s dream is fated to end in Tragedy. How we navigate these challenges—finding out what kind of knight you really are, and building a legacy of a brighter tomorrow—is the heart of the Pendragon experience. One of my favorite bits of text from Greg’s sixth edition manuscript is a little essay he wrote entitled “Bringing the Light”. I will close by sharing it here in its entirety: The medieval Britain of history, inherent in the old literature, was a dismal, violent, and cruel place, with outdated standards of behavior. Setting the game in this world was a deliberate choice, for alongside the dark overtones comes hope for a brighter tomorrow. In the campaign, the Gamemaster paints a harsh background as the reality within which the characters move. Initially, the Gamemaster’s characters are merciless and brutal. Player-knights may choose to remain in that unenlightened realm of history—this kind of behavior does not penalize them, but neither rewards them. But they also have a choice to join the struggle to improve the world. Their actions can stand as shining lights of exceptional behavior, breaking the old ways and preparing for a better realm. The story of King Arthur is about the struggle to improve life. With his faithful knights, he manifests the dream of a better world. The game dramatizes this heroic effort in its play. Great rewards go to those who struggle to improve the kingdom. King Arthur changes the world, slowly to be sure, but in general for the better. Bloodthirsty warlords, selfish sorcerers, and even the environment itself in the form of the Wasteland, all conspire against these changes. The Player-knights are an important part of the struggle for the betterment of Britain. The improvements in the lives of women and commoners are hallmarks of Arthur’s efforts. Ladies make great gains both socially and legally over the course of his reign. Women may become knights if they wish, gain the power to choose their own husbands, and, whether knight or noblewoman, eventually may inherit their due estates and take care of them without a warden. Commoners are among King Arthur’s earliest supporters, and he even forms Parliament to give them a place to exercise their powers alongside the clergy and lords. The Gamemaster decides how much resistance hinders these changes. You may of course decide on presenting a fantasy realm that is better than our modern world, with fairness, justice, and goodwill everywhere. However, that attitude significantly alters the stories, and what the stories mean. The best balance comes when the world is at first medieval, reactionary, and reluctant to change; yet slowly yields under the influence of the Player-knights and their allies in Arthur’s court working to create a luminous realm. Art from the forthcoming 6th edition of Pendragon —TOP: Andrey Fetisov —BOTTOM: Katrin Dirim
    7 points
  19. You're certainly entitled to change your mind, even in print. 🙂 If you feel inclined to share, what do you see as the benefit to this revision? You are obviously under no obligation to justify your creative choices to randos on the internet, but if you're in the mood it might aid in understanding. (If that belongs in a different thread, that's fine too.) Well, if the God Learners were confident that two Goddesses were the same, what could possibly go wrong? 😉
    7 points
  20. A picture of Enerava Chan, the young High Priestess of Ernalda in the Colymar tribe. I love this depiction way more than the one in the GM Screen Pack. By Anna Orlova.
    7 points
  21. I’m trying to figure out how to respond to this thread in a way that is useful. I think my perspective is possibly useful, but not necessarily very gameable. First of all, I am a trans woman. There is a complicated interplay between “our imaginary culture has a different perspective on sex and gender than modern western society” and “how do we make a space for gender variant people that doesn’t actually affirm them.” What do I mean by that? Presumably, trans people exist in Orlanthi culture. Are all trans women nandani and all trans men vingan? Or, likewise, gay men and lesbians? Do all gender variant people with uteruses fall into the orlanthi category of vingan? Is there a way for a trans woman to be seen as a woman in orlanthi culture? Can a person with a “male” body sex be of vingan gender? Adding more genders is awesome. But then generating a gender-essentialist “woman bodies with air runes are vingan” structure gets complicated really fast, and isn’t maybe as affirming as you might want it to be, if you are indeed trying to be affirming and welcoming to trans people. If you are adding genders and physical sexes and *aren’t* wanting to be affirming and welcoming of trans and gender variant people, what exactly are you trying to do? Dunno. Just something to think about, maybe.
    7 points
  22. By Jason Durall, RuneQuest creative director The Starter Set for RuneQuest: Roleplaying in Glorantha is coming! Between now and its release later this year, RuneQuest creative director Jason Durall's Design Diary will share insights about the development of this exciting new boxed set which will introduce the RuneQuest RPG and Greg Stafford's mythic world of Glorantha to all-new audiences. Diary #1: What to expect in the RQ Starter Set Diary #2: Cover Art reveal, and what's inside the box Diary #3: The new adventurers Diary #4: More about the new adventurers Diary #5: Welcome to Jonstown, setting for the Starter Set (guest post by Jeff Richard) Diary #6: Creating the Jonstown City Maps (guest post by Jeff Richard) Diary #7: Printer's proofs are back! Diary #8: A Gateway to Adventure Diary #9: Beyond the Starter Set Diary #10: Take a look at an advance copy of the Starter Set (guest post by Rick Meints) Diary #11: The back covers make a map! (guest post by Michael O'Brien) Diary #12: Putting the SoloQuest in RuneQuest A guest post from Chaosium's James Coquillat and David Naylor Last year, the two of us were excited to be given the chance to help write the upcoming RuneQuest Starter Set's solo adventure. As Jason notes in his previous Design Diary, this was to be a one person scenario introducing new players to the setting and mechanics of RuneQuest that would also excite veteran adventurers with a thrilling standalone story they can play through on their own. In the solo adventure the reader plays as Vasana, a capable warrior and leader, as she experiences the perils of a pivotal battle in the war between rebellious Sartar and the Lunar Empire. As relatively new Glorantha fans ourselves (both born over a decade after the third edition was released), we worked closely with the RuneQuest creative team to develop the scenario. Using Twine, the open-source tool for telling interactive, nonlinear stories, we designed the story structure and incorporated all the mechanics and mythology that made us fall in love with RuneQuest. As Vasana navigates the conflict, the reader will learn crucial RuneQuest mechanics like drawing inspiration, using rune magic, striking, parrying, and planning manoeuvres. They'll have the opportunity to choose their own route through the conflict and, depending on Vasana's actions and success, the Battle of Dangerford's outcome could be very different. Using the standard solo adventure framework of branching narrative threads, we pinned distinct scenes that would always happen and used these situations to teach fundamental mechanics. We then allowed the branches to splay apart and ripple with the reader's actions so that unique events and mechanics could be introduced. Not every reader will discover the relevance of the Crimson Bat. Not all readers will stand before the Judge of the Dead and enter into Spirit Combat. Some readers will favor stealth and finding secrets. Others will charge headlong into battle and earn honor for their name and tribe. Each playthrough will give different results and although set pieces will be revisited, they'll never be quite the same. One way we made sure that each reader's playthrough will differ is by tallying a Battle Result Total (BRT) throughout the adventure. When Vasana's actions give the Sartar rebels the upper hand, the BRT increases. When she fails or costs them valuable resources, the BRT reduces. Depending on the final tally, the battle can have several different outcomes. But we won't mention them here. Some things are best discovered! The RuneQuest Starter Set is Almost Here! The RuneQuest Starter Set contains everything you need to play an epic roleplaying game of gods, cults, magic, family, and fantasy and is coming soon! Sign up with the link below and by Issaries, you will receive an email as soon as the RuneQuest Starter Set is available to order! CLICK THIS LINK TO SUBSCRIBE
    7 points
  23. Behold, Katiperi astride her Great Golden Lion, blazing forth to defend the Sky Realm. The epic of her great friendship, feud, and reconciliation with Tay-Tay the Swift has great power to weave peace among mighty foes who could be even mightier allies.
    7 points
  24. I get the impression that people are confused about what the Great Compromise is. The eternal gods themselves would have ceased to exist but for the Cosmic Compromise, whereby the gods that still existed abdicated their free will within the temporal world voluntarily, rather than lose their All into the maw of nonexistence. The gods remained eternal, at the cost of being restricted henceforth to only the deeds they had performed during the God Time, which are now fixed and unchanging in the world of Time. If the gods were ever to transgress their fixed and allocated positions in the Cosmos, they would enter the shifting world of Time and would be destroyed by Death and entropy. So when a god acts within the temporal world it does what it always has done. Orlanth is a great World Storm and sends storms and thunders, only to part for the Sun, but then return again. The gods exist as they did in the Gods War, Death co-existing with Life. Within the bounds of their Gods Time actions, the gods exist eternally. That is for the good and the bad. Disease cannot be completely banished, mortals are doomed to die (unless an individual mortal becomes something else), and each dusk the Sun shall descend into the Underworld. There is a set pattern to the cosmos. The gods' worshipers are not so bound and they can wield the god's power. Whenever someone casts Rune magic, that is the god in action. That does not violate the Compromise (unless those mortals manage to change the pattern of the world by their actions). The Red Goddess was a new greater god appearing in Time. Her deeds changed the pattern of the world. Some consider the battle of Castle Blue an amendment to the Great Compromise, and now even the Red Goddess is bound by Time. But her worshipers are most definitely not.
    7 points
  25. My three rules for playing a trickster. Drive it like you stole it. Be a dick in character, but not in real life - don't ruin the game, be the game. Enjoy the spectacular crash. Let it happen when the time comes. And that's just my way, there are other ways. If I did it again I might do it a different way. Tricksters aren't for everyone, and they aren't for every group. It requires a certain amount of buy-in from everyone.
    7 points
  26. Suffice it to say the decision was the end result of a lot of deliberation and not done on some whim. It had nothing to do with Gen Con timing or the release of any other game, or the end of the business quarter. PS: Chaosium offers older Pendragon things because we inherited them from Nocturnal, who used to sell them. PPS: We don't have any immediate plans to release more older CoC titles right now. We are devoting our energies to fulfilling the current Classic Kickstarter and working on other current 7th ed. products. After the kickstarter has shipped we'll start getting other older titles back into print. We got HotOE and BtMoM back into print, as well as CoC 2nd ed and 5 classic supplements. That's not bad for the last year or so.
    7 points
  27. I don’t actively ignore anything, I think, but as all games I’ve run have been in the Dragon Pass area I’ve not bothered to read up on the rest of the world. Also there’s so much info I go with ”good enough”. Fun is the aim, not Fantasy anthropology.
    6 points
  28. There has been a lot of stuff written about playing heroquests: the "SuperRuneQuest" rules, the "stick to the stations, watch out for surprises" play-throughs, the "weirdness and ad-hoc narrative mechanics all the way down" approach, and so on. That's all fine, but I want to know what different ways people handle going *into* a heroquest in the first place? And for this thread I specifically want to talk about so-called "Hero-plane" and "Other-world" heroquests, i.e. when you actually leave the mundane world. How do you trigger the heroquest voluntarily? I've seen it done with either a Rune Spell or Spirit Magic Spell that lets you "go through the threshold". I've seen it done with a simple Rune affinity roll at "some opportune time". I've seen it done basically automatically given "some" appropriate situation (whatever that is). What do you use in your game? Does your Glorantha have involuntary heroquesting? In which case, how does it happen? Is it automatic (gamemaster fiat/railroading), or is there more to it? Do your players have to be careful when they cast too much Rune Magic or when they quote a popular folk song about Orlanth while waving a shield? What kind of resources do you need to start the heroquest in your Glorantha? Can you trigger the heroquest on your own with two sticks and a piece of rope? Does a clan festival, a cult temple, some regalia, the right time of year, and other such things simply increase your odds of succeeding, or are they absolutely required? Thanks!
    6 points
  29. My own strong recommendation for a newcomer would be to do exactly what the RQG Core rules and Chaosium’s own scenarios suggest: your default RuneQuest party should be based in Sartar (not “all Sartarite”), should include at least one Orlanth cultist and ideally an Ernaldan as well (otherwise some cultural-default stuff will be harder to use, though by no means impossible), and should start the campaign by visiting Jonstown (RuneQuest Starter Set) or Clearwine (GM Screen Pack Adventure Book), hoping eventually to work for the famous Queen Leika of the Colymar Tribe. (You don’t want to work for the Malani Tribe, because they’re all assholes. RQG Core tells you that the Colymar are the default Sartarites, and Chaosium’s books support this) Bin any legacy notions that every adventurer should be from the same clan, adventuring out of their home village: that stuff may have worked well in HeroQuestWorldWars times, but the actual Hero Wars are now kicking off in earnest, and you’ll have more fun if you’re a flexible, mobile, ambitious warband, able to pick up opportunities wherever they present themselves (becoming a Colymar Thane, frex). Just like Vasana & Co.
    6 points
  30. here's a couple more - this is from a scenario I'm working on that takes place entirely in a small castle. I wanted to see what it would look like...
    6 points
  31. Well the God Learners were normally pretty spot-on with their Mythical Synthesis. And Ernalda and Dendara are SO close. They both share the same Yelm magical association, their priestesses can participate in each other's ceremonies etc. And so the God Learners tried to get Ernalda and Dendara to acknowledge that they are the same deity by another name (like they had done countless times before - Shargash and Tolat, Lodril and countless other volcano gods, Yelm and Ehilm, etc.). And that failed. There is a core of Dendara that is incompatible with being Ernalda and vice versa. Now the meta-game thing is that in the oldest manuscripts, Ernalda was an aspect of Dendara, and Orlanth Rex was an acknowledged husband of Dendara. This got changed pretty early, as Greg decided it was important that Yelm and Dendara acknowledge each other as spouses, BUT Ernalda can call Yelm and Orlanth (and several others) as husbands. And so the goddesses became separate although magically they are nearly identical.
    6 points
  32. Hence, the Arkati troll in deep meditation is " just chillin' ".
    6 points
  33. This is not my view at all. Eurmal is recognised by the Orlanthi as an important god, and his followers are protected - as long as they remain within their proscribed role. The one exception is when a public scapegoat is needed - then Eurmal is blamed and the Clown is outlawed or driven out of town. When a Trickster swears loyalty to an Orlanth cultist, they gain additional protection (and the Orlanthi becomes liable for the acts of that Trickster), but are subject to that Orlanthi. SOCIAL/POLITICAL POSITION AND POWER In Orlanthi society, Tricksters form a sort of clown society. They are contrarians, jesters, and satirists, who can violate social constraints freely. These clowns both show what is wrong with the way things are and also how to do ordinary things the wrong way. Paradoxically, by violating these norms and taboos, they help define acceptable boundaries. In other societies, Tricksters are typically outlawed. No one would be caught dead seeking a trickster for social support, advice, or political power. Even among their own kind, famous or powerful tricksters are likelier to be the butts of practical jokes than objects of respect. Any influence possessed by the Trickster cult derives from actions and pranks aimed at satirizing or mocking foolish or ridiculous acts on the part of rulers. Tricksters are not trusted by anyone. They are not well liked and are tolerated only when necessary (as in Orlanth’s case). Tricksters are ill mannered, gluttonous, and selfish in every way. No sane society supports such misfits. CLOWNS A social oddity and convenience for the Orlanthi, Clowns are Tricksters and, as such, can get away with almost any social disruption and trouble because of the useful functions they provide through showing what is serious, absurd, baffling, or wrong, fearful or comical about life and the cosmos. The Orlanthi recognize this as powerful magic that both disrupts and helps to maintain the cosmos. Another function of the Clown is that of public scapegoat, for whenever there is some official cause to find a person at fault the Clowns are the ones chosen. They may be outlawed, driven out of town, or (rarely) killed. Until they are used as scapegoats, Clowns can violate sacred laws freely while they carry out their ritual roles. However, Clowns are required to dress in special costume to enjoy this protection. Some initiates paint their body with black and white stripes, cover themselves with mud or filth, wear false phalluses, or simply wear their clothing backwards and inside out. Clowns sometimes appear—usually without invitation—at the ceremonies of other Orlanthi cults and mock them along with other attendees. At other public ceremonies, clowns may dance out of step, sing out of tune, and imitate cult and other societal leaders. They beg food, throw food away, or are gluttons. They even use magical regalia in inappropriate ways, engage in foolish, silly, or even obscene side-shows, often with respected members of the community.
    6 points
  34. Chaosium's staff cartographer Matt Ryan on why the recently-released A Time to Harvest has a special place in his artistic career. A Time to Harvest holds a special place in my heart and in my artistic career. Complete disclosure: despite having several Chaosium games on my shelves, I’d never played Call of Cthulhu until the organized play release of this campaign in 2016. Excited to play, I asked my local comic book shop owner, Tim, if I could run weekly sessions in his store (Comics for Collectors, Ithaca NY). I hoped to introduce new players to the hobby. Not only did Tim say yes, he joined the game! We put up fliers, and people showed up, played once, and stayed for the campaign. The organized play version was released to Cult of Chaos members monthly, with each chapter coming with supplemental maps. Looking at the map that was supplied of Cobb’s Corners, a fictional Vermont town, I wondered if I could draw it in 3-D perspective. I did, the sketch wasn't awful, and I shared it on a Call of Cthulhu group’s social media. MATT'S FAN MAP OF COBB'S CORNERS Chaosium Call of Cthulhu creative director Mike Mason saw the sketch and messaged me, asking if I’d like to draw maps for him. Of course I agreed. While not my first maps for Chaosium – Jeff Richard had earlier seen my work and asked me to draw six maps for The Glorantha Sourcebook – I was excited to draw maps for Call of Cthulhu. Assignment followed assignment and I contributed maps to several great Call of Cthulhu books. And then Mike asked me if I’d like to draw new maps and handouts for the new A Time to Harvest book. I almost fell out of my chair. I love this campaign. It’s terrifically terrifying, especially chapter two (personal favorite) and the climactic scene on the village green. While running it I’d made new friends, strengthened relationships with current friends who joined the game, and introduced Call of Cthulhu to a dozen new players. Mike gave me great artistic freedom and let me create all sorts of marginalia art and drawings not in the original scope of work. It was fantastic fun. Propelled by this project, I went on to draw more maps for Jeff Richard and Jason Durall for RuneQuest line, for David Larkins for the Pendragon line, and for Lynne Hardy's excellent new campaign The Children of Fear. I was having the time of my life. While working on the Sartar Master Map for the forthcoming Sartar campaign supplement, Jeff sounded me out as to whether I’d be up for joining Team Chaosium as the in-house cartographer. Mike enthusiastically encouraged me in this idea, and in January 2021 Chaosium and I made it official. I’ve been able to work on some fantastic projects since then, not all of which I can talk about yet, and the fun continues! SOME OF MATT'S CARTOGRAPHY IN A TIME TO HARVEST:
    6 points
  35. The Starter Set is in layout as we speak, and art is coming in on the core books; we should be getting those into layout over the winter. In addition to art and layout, which always take at least as long as writing and editing, we're also dealing with a tremendously messed-up supply chain at the moment, as I know you're all aware, which causes knock-on delays. The goal is to get everything queued up so that we can release the first wave of 6th edition in quick succession—the last thing we want is months-long gaps between core book/Starter Set releases. At the moment, that means we need to be a little cagey about release dates (other than "definitely 2022"). When you start to see more precise estimates, you'll know that means we're very nearly there! In the meantime, keep an eye out for monthly Design Journals (next installment dropping this week) and, as we get closer to release, some sneak peaks at art and other goodies.
    6 points
  36. Saw this and immediately thought of this forum. This place kinda feels like it could have been an Orlanthi highland city. The house-complexes also look vaguely like the Ernaldan square houses we've been introduced to. I mean, it's not Boldhome or Whitewall, I suppose, but it's cool!
    6 points
  37. That’s how I’d read it, too, but most of the discussion in this thread doesn’t seem to be taking that kind of expansive approach, and I think the very ambiguity which allows us to read it in a way that works for us means that others can implement it in an essentialist way that ends up trending towards a very complicated “we have extra genders, but are still going to be essentialist and transphobic” way, which doesn’t make me feel great. I suppose I really want the orlanthi all to apply to pretty much all of this stuff explicitly, and for the gaming culture around it to embrace that, but perhaps that’s wishful thinking on my part.
    6 points
  38. The way that I (a fellow trans woman) read/interpret the statements about Orlanthi sex and gender is that it is possible to have any gender role with any body, and that categories like vingan and nandan and helering and null are for people who wish to express a particular kind of nonbinary gender- three sets of people who are in some respects men and others women (two according to complicated ritual reasons, one able to move freely however they please), and one set of people who are in no respect either. I have no idea if there will ever be any explicit rules statements that contradict this or support this, and thus far even statements by the creative people involved with the IP have never said anything directly about which Orlanthi gender corresponds to which trans identities in their understanding, beyond elliptical statements. Which is good, because if we read vingans as trans men or transmasculine straightforwardly, there's sure some interesting pronoun choices at work, and the same for the infrequent references to Nandan and nandans. But laying them out as nonbinary identities keeps that specter at one remove. As for sexuality, the only explicit cultic connection is between the cult of Orlanth and bisexuality/pansexuality. I think that based on the indirect statements, that if there were "gay cults" or "lesbian cults" there would also have to be heterosexual cults, because Sartarite culture is intended to be some degree of either binormative or non-normative.
    6 points
  39. Well, I just had a very pleasant talk with my FLGS, Warp1, who I recently reported had no interest in stocking RuneQuest. Thought I would give them one more chance and talked with the owner James (have not seen the lad since the late 90’s or early 21st century) and he says he is bringing in a bunch of the Starter sets. Got him to put one on the side for me when they arrive and to give me call and an email (brick and mortar store so he says the PDF should be included). He also agreed to let me run a demo once we end the lockdown again (said he would have leapt at the chance if we weren’t under lockdown)! WOOHOO!
    6 points
  40. Hmmm. And we have statements that the Arrolian city-states have been operating Moon Boats for years before the Thaw, or claimed to. And then there's the Legion of Infants and that expedition by the Lunar Empire proper, which was one of the events leading to the Thaw. So to dive into metaphysics for a moment, if we understand Varnaro's ritual as defining the death of the God of the Silver Feet and the loss of Communication as a blessing, then perhaps the Kingdom of War is a "curse of Communication", and this is why it spreads so easily and permits the mingling of every god of war: everyone within the KoW communicates perfectly well and disputes are resolved easily and without strife. But alas, communication with outsiders is a difficult process, to be done at the point of a sword. (I think the whole "Loskalmi toxic emotional waste" motif also works here- the things Loskalm rejects mingle with the curse of Communication (and possibly other things!) and they become the Kingdom of War.)
    6 points
  41. Hi, the automatic SSL renewal didn't happen. I've manually renewed the certificate now. Sorry for any inconvenience.
    6 points
  42. I don't particularly think that Questworlds would do a better or worse job than RuneQuest does for a community based campaign - in fact my own (very extensive) experience is that it doesn't. RuneQuest has a gritty and dangerous combat engine that encourages many players to look for another way of reaching their goals without necessarily resorting to violence. I have had more Dance-offs, Sing-offs, passions contests, Oratorical battles and the like in RQG than in HW/HQG. That threat of danger to the adventurers is a Sword of Damocles that encourages other ways. And so in most of my groups, Ernalda is popular, as is Issaries, Lhankor Mhy, and Chalana Arroy. Turns out fighting against Tusk Riders the spell Command Pig is as useful as Thunderbolt and much less costly. Pathwatch is a superbly useful spell, as are Lhankor Mhy's investigative magic. But this is pretty off-topic now.
    5 points
  43. Her cult doesn't have that power. Even the Yelm cult doesn't have that power. And the Orlanth cult didn't have that power until the late Second Age when Alakoring Rex found a way to command priests and summon his worshipers. And that was likely only possible in the crucible of magical exploration and experimentation we call the EWF.
    5 points
  44. I've made a spreadsheet to calculate whether it's a good idea to augment or not. Take a single skill level. Roll 10000 times and figure out what level of result (crit, fail, etc.) is achieved. Take a single augment skill level. Roll 10000 times and figure out if the initial roll made earlier would be a better or worse level of success due to the augment. Sum up the number of improved, unchanged, and worsened results. For the purposes of determining if the result is worse, I took a fumbled augment to be the same as forcing a fumble on the actual skill. So for example if you have a skill of 90, then augmenting with a skill of 60 will (in a single test run of 10000 rolls) improve your result 1025 times, and make it worse 1212 times, so it's statistically not a good idea to do that. Don't augment a 90 skill with a 60 skill. If you have a skill of 90 and you augment it with a skill of 70, then you will make it better 1141 times and worse 973 times, so that is a good idea. The break-even point for a skill of 90 appears to be around 65. Above or equal to that, it's worth augmenting. Below that, it is not. If you have a skill of 40, the break point is 51. Below that you are hurting your average result level. I thought that it should be obvious to everyone that augmenting with a skill below 50 is never a good idea! However, with a base skill of 10, the break point is 34. It is actually worthwhile using a skill of 34 to augment a skill of 10. ON THE OTHER HAND. I just changed the logic to re-purpose the roll for the augment as would have been the original skill attempt, and make a fresh die roll for the augmented skill roll. That's more "realistic", but I am surprised that it makes a statistical difference. That moves the break point for a skill of 10 up to 37. Anything below a 37 is harmful, if you instead use the first die roll for augment instead of skill, and re-roll for skill. That's just weird and I don't understand it. The change also moves the break point for a 90% skill up to 71% - anything below that makes things worse. Here's the current version, using the changed mechanic. You will need to make a copy in your own Google Drive account to change the numbers in blue and wait for the results to propagate. https://docs.google.com/spreadsheets/d/1T-297SCfn7b5UGaNktfmc8tSfxpnQODw2tnIsOJkulE/edit?usp=sharing
    5 points
  45. Hmmm. I played around with the dynamics here, and produced a eight-spoked wheel (with a symbol of Moorcock-Chaos because I put arrowheads on the "opposing" powers) and for each Power rune, you have one superior rune, one inferior rune, one opposite rune, and four more nebulous relationships. I constructed, based on the oppositions and some of these mythical relationships, the following chain: Life/fertility > disorder > stasis/stability > illusion > death > harmony > movement > truth > life/fertility So if we take Life and look at it, we have truth superior and disorder inferior, death as the opposite. "Inner" connections: harmony, illusion. "Outer" connections: stasis, movement. There are some interesting immediate implications here! Death has illusion superior, harmony inferior, life opposite, truth and disorder as inner connections, stasis and movement as outer connections. Outer connections are obviously going to be identical between opposed pairs. And the synchronicities just pile up if we assume inner connections are augmenting each other. Truth synchs with death and stasis, disorder with death and movement... so we could have our Chaos Star/Dharma Wheel and it generally fits together. Interesting how the Dragon rune has eight points...
    5 points
  46. Here is perhaps a far more objective and accurate description: "Another important rebellion was in the north of Sartar, and was important because it was intratribal rather than between tribes. In 1606, many priests of the cult of Orlanth began agitating for violent expulsion of the Lunars. However, there were already established Lunar families in those tribes, and there arose lawsuits and feuds which disrupted all the north for five years. In 1611, many tribal assemblies broke up into civil disputes, and the same year in Storm Season the city of Alda-Chur was torn asunder by rival Orlanth and Lunar antagonists in a conflict called the Righteous Wind Rebellion. Harvar Ironfist, a noble of the Vantaros tribe, seized the opportunity and made himself Prince of the Far Point after his wind walking bodyguards destroyed the main Orlanthi opposition in a vicious battle in the Storm Temple. All the tribes quickly purged their ranks of the agitators, and a flood of new refugees fled southwards."
    5 points
  47. My answer has to do with the Minderkind Sages of Riverjoin (mentioned in one of the Wyrms Foonotes as believing that Storm Bull killed Kajabor rather than Wakboth but not seen or heard in later publications). Their odd belief, I supposed, was a general part of their philosophy and they went around proving that Good was Evil, Freedom is Slavery and War is Peace etc. Their leader was Varnaro of Riverjoin who could Life was Death which led to her ability at killing with a glance. Now prior attempts at eliminating the Ban had failed because it was treated as a Great Curse. Varnaro decided to eliminate the Ban by treating it as a Great Blessing instead. Hence to destroy it she would summon the Devil. Much labour and material was expended in the summoning which yielded a "huge translucent demon" (Guide p218) which stands at her side. The summoning was judged a failure and she retired having apparently wasted everybody's time for no good reason. It was only after contact with the Lunar Empire resumed that people started connecting the dots and found out her summoning was a huge success. So a grateful population made her ruler of Riverjoin. It is only with the appearance of the Kingdom of War that people have gotten the big picture and are wondering what to do next...
    5 points
  48. It's almost like the Lunar have been making a bad habit of meddling with forces they don't understand or control nearly as well as they think they do until it backfires on them horribly, or something.
    5 points
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