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  1. 21 points
    Coming soon to the Chaosium’s Jonstown Compendium webstore: the revised and expanded Rough Guide to Glamour. A Rough Guide to Glamour is your indispensible companion for any visit to the capital city of the greatest empire the world of Glorantha has ever known! This book contains: • A comprehensive map, gazetteer and guidebook detailing the capital of the Lunar Empire; • Portraits and descriptions of eleven Very Important People who can be encountered there, including Moonson, the Red Emperor, and the Lunar hero Jar-eel the Razoress; • A description and map of the Sultanate of the Silver Shadow, the throbbing heart of the Lunar Empire; • Sweeping overviews of the geography and history of the Lunar Empire; • RuneQuest writeups for the cults of the Red Emperor, immortal wizard-ruler of the Lunar Empire, and the goddess Glamour, the humble nymph who became the First Inspiration of Moonson; • Insights into the secrets of Kalikos Icebreaker, the Lunar College of Magic and the Imperial Monopolies of the Etyries cult; • Never republished supporting material from the legendary fanzine Tales of the Reaching Moon; • Rumours, fiction, poetry, and more besides! This is a thoroughly revised and expanded edition of the original Rough Guide to Glamour, written by Chris Gidlow, Mike Hagen, Nick Brooke, Michael O’Brien, Jeff Richard, Greg Stafford and friends, lavishly illustrated by Dario Corallo, Simon Bray, Julie Hudson and other artists. Foreword by Jeff Richard, Chair and Creative Director of Chaosium Inc. A Rough Guide to Glamour was first published as a players’ background book supporting Reaching Moon Megacorp’s Life of Moonson, a 50-player live-action role-playing game that debuted in 1997 and ran in the United States, Europe and Australia.
  2. 17 points
    Chaosium is pleased to announce the release of the Basic Roleplaying System Reference Document (SRD). The Basic Roleplaying SRD is based on Basic Roleplaying, the simple, fast, and elegant skill-based percentile system that is the core of most Chaosium roleplaying games, including Call of Cthulhu, RuneQuest, SuperWorld, and others. Under the provisions of the Basic Roleplaying Open Game License (OGL), designers can create their own roleplaying games using the Basic Roleplaying rules engine, royalty-free and without further permission from Chaosium Inc. For further details and to download the SRD document, see our Basic Roleplaying SRD information page. Please note: the BRP Open Game License for use of the Basic Roleplaying system differs from the Wizards Open Game License and has different terms and conditions.
  3. 17 points
    Coming soon to the Chaosium’s Jonstown Compendium webstore: the revised and expanded Rough Guide to Glamour. A Rough Guide to Glamour is your indispensible companion for any visit to the capital city of the greatest empire the world of Glorantha has ever known! This book contains: • A comprehensive map, gazetteer and guidebook detailing the capital of the Lunar Empire; • Portraits and descriptions of eleven Very Important People who can be encountered there, including Moonson, the Red Emperor, and the Lunar hero Jar-eel the Razoress; • A description and map of the Sultanate of the Silver Shadow, the throbbing heart of the Lunar Empire; • Sweeping overviews of the geography and history of the Lunar Empire; • RuneQuest writeups for the cults of the Red Emperor, immortal wizard-ruler of the Lunar Empire, and the goddess Glamour, the humble nymph who became the First Inspiration of Moonson; • Insights into the secrets of Kalikos Icebreaker, the Lunar College of Magic and the Imperial Monopolies of the Etyries cult; • Never republished supporting material from the legendary fanzine Tales of the Reaching Moon; • Rumours, fiction, poetry, and more besides! This is a thoroughly revised and expanded edition of the original Rough Guide to Glamour, written by Chris Gidlow, Mike Hagen, Nick Brooke, Michael O’Brien, Jeff Richard, Greg Stafford and friends, lavishly illustrated by Dario Corallo, Simon Bray, Julie Hudson and other artists. Foreword by Jeff Richard, Chair and Creative Director of Chaosium Inc. A Rough Guide to Glamour was first published as a players’ background book supporting Reaching Moon Megacorp’s Life of Moonson, a 50-player live-action role-playing game that debuted in 1997 and ran in the United States, Europe and Australia.
  4. 15 points
    Here is the second Rune Fixes: It gives more details on the Rune Spells Extension and Berserker, and for Aimed Blows, and Two-Weapon Fighting. Rune Fixes are also available to download from the Chaosium website, along with an assorted set of related free downloads for RuneQuest: Roleplaying in Glorantha, including Rune Fixes #1, the RQ2/3 to RQG conversion guide, errata for RQG's first printing, and information about Gloranthan metals and crystals from the forthcoming GM's book. All available to download free: https://www.chaosium.com/runequest-rune-fixes
  5. 15 points
    Chaosium currently prints its books in the USA, China, and Lithuania. Where we print depends on several factors including cost, quality, format, and timeliness. For example, we print our B&W softcovers in the USA and Lithuania. We print our color hardcovers in China and Lithuania, and occasionally in the USA. Setting aside the hyperbolic mentions of sanity, cruel claws, and such, this isn't something we do on a whim. I spend a good portion of my "day job" at Chaosium trying to best source our print projects. Here are a few things to keep in mind: 1. Most of the books we sell are sold to distributors that pay us 40% of the cover price. That means we get $20 for a $50 book, and we have to pay to ship it to the distributor. 2. Out of that $20 we have to pay the authors, artists, editors, layout people, etc. along with paying for the printing. Each $1 of extra cost means a big bite out of our profit. 3. To remain competitive with the major game publishers we have to look good on the shelf next to their full color hardcovers. Otherwise game shops are less likely to stock our books, except for special orders and pre-orders, which are only a small small portion of their (and our) sales. 4. I'm not sure what time frame you are referring to, but a $15 book in 1980 would cost $47 in 2020, when adjusted for inflation. Most RPG books in 1980 were in B&W. In 1993 the CoC core rulebook was $30.00. That's $53.56 in today's dollars, which is very close to what we charge today ($54.95). 5. Wages for many people have not kept up with the rate of inflation, and that just sucks. People have less buying power than they did 20 or 30 years ago.
  6. 15 points
    The short version of the history of RuneQuest: Adventures in Glorantha and RuneQuest Slayers. In December of 1990, Chaosium stopped working on RuneQuest projects. Prior to then, Chaosium did all the writing, editing, art, and layout related work. They basically sent AH a "ready to print" set of files, which AH would then print, market, and sell. Starting in 1991, Avalon Hill had to develop all future RQ supplements from start to finish on their own. Additionally, if it was a Gloranthan work it had to be approved by Chaosium, and Chaosium would retain the copyright. If a supplement was non-Gloranthan then AH did not have to get Chaosium approval and AH would own the copyright. In the early 90s several people began working on a new 4th edition of RuneQuest which was given the working title of RuneQuest: Adventures in Glorantha. Considering that most RPGs get a new edition every 5 years or so, and that RQ had its first three editions come out within a span of 6 years, it wasn't much of a surprise that a new edition was in the works. In 1994 Greg did not approve the manuscript for publication. Thus, AH could not publish RQ:AiG, even if they wanted to. Chaosium sold the RuneQuest trademark to Avalon Hill in 1997. They did not sell AH any copyrights related to Glorantha. The agreement also specifically stated that AH could not print or reprint any existing Gloranthan RQ titles, nor could it create any new Gloranthan ones. To make use of the Trademark, AH would have to create a new game, largely from a blank sheet of paper. Thus, they ultimately decided to create a non-Gloranthan game called RuneQuest: Slayers. I have never heard of a specific reason why AH appended "Slayers" onto the name, although I am sure they did so in part to show this was a new and different game to all previous editions. As has been said, as RQ: Slayers was being printed, AH was bought by Hasbro and Hasbro scrapped the project. Years later they even let the RuneQuest trademark lapse (they did not renew it), allowing Greg Stafford to re-register it for his own purposes in the early 2000s.
  7. 14 points
    Enter a podcast of wonder A grizzled old man with a poorly constructed box under his arm limps into the centre of the dusty square, coughs and wipes phlegm speckled lips, scratches his butt and spits. None of the busy merchants or their eager clients spare more than a suspicious glance in his direction. He places the box in the centre of the square and steps shakily on to it and it immediately falls apart with a crash spilling him bodily into the dust, with many loud and profane curses.. A couple of urchins run out and help him to his feet, fleeing after finding his purse as empty as it looked—the old man’s boots flailing on empty air instead of their butts as they disappear into the now gathering throng. The entire square begins to chortle, and then laughs begin to ring out, first one then another as he proudly brushes himself off while eyeing his now gathered audience. Figuring it to be as ready as it can be, he clears his throat and begins. “I am sure you have many questions” he begins in a surprisingly loud and sonorous voice… “yes, you over there. Speak up, hmm. Will it be dangerous, you ask,” “Will what be dangerous, you old fool”. retorts the surprised and befuddled merchant. Another demands to know, “What have you been smoking, old man. Make sense!" Ignoring these retorts, he continues his nonsensical speech to the confused throng, “Why yes, extremely dangerous. You ma’am, your question... am I qualified and is your safety assured, no and no.” he responds to a bemused woman holding a casaba melon in one hand whilst she shakes her bejeweled and braided hair, which dances about in a fetching way, gems sparkling as they catch the morning sun. “And you in the back, the timid one... excuse me, can you speak up, man, Ah yes I see, you ask has this been tested?” a small nebbishy looking chap with a scraggly beard and turban peers over the shoulder of a large woman. “Yes, that is exactly what, I ...” begins the startled and bewildered little man only to be shushed in mid-sentence by the large woman and then hurried away, feet scrambling to find firm ground to the amusement of all. “Great question, NO! Which is why I have assembled you all here: the bravest of the brave, true heroes all! Hear me now! “Our maiden voyage (and again louder) I SAY OUR MAIDEN VOYAGE on the good ship https://windwords.fm to the lands of Glorantha, will sail upon the roiling, bubbling and extremely dangerous waters of imagination and will depart as soon as you launch your browser and point it to, I SAY AGAIN, https://windwords.fm. and hit play or click on one of the many other fine choices of vehicles offered there such as the SS Spotify or your choice of Apple or Google Podcast, as well as a goodly selection of other podcasting services. Let them take you to a world of wonder as you voyage on the adventure filled seas of the Internet!” So come, leave the mundane behind! Enjoy your exercise routine for a change, forget your commuting hassles, make cooking an adventure and join @Joerg, @Bill the barbarian and @lordabdul as we explore the exotic and yet familiar world of Glorantha in a monthly podcast, discover the news and rumours of the adventure filled green lozenge, hear sages discourse on subjects divers and fascinating! In other words, let us entertain you by choosing your subscription of choice at @ https://windwords.fm. Give us your comments here, or at Tribe@windwords.fm
  8. 14 points
    The current Gods of Glorantha manuscript is over 600 pages in length. The work done thus far required a lot of author time, and many of the cults in this manuscript already had a lot of their info already fleshed out (although it did have to be updated and edited, sometimes heavily). It is quite easy to imagine that the rest of the cults in Glorantha would require at least as big of a manuscript, and many of them have far less written about them. There is a very distinct tradeoff between getting a lot of Gloranthan Cults this year, or getting every Gloranthan cult two or three years from now. We at the Chaosium have decided to provide a large number of cults based on what most players desire the most. Holding up the publication of a cult from Dragon Pass or Prax for a few years so people can also get the Cult of (insert deity rarely worshipped in some far flung corner of the lozenge) at the same time would disappoint far more people. The goal of "complete" would, quite bluntly, just sacrifice every ounce of "timeliness". As for what we are interested in publishing, that is another matter. There are two main factors at work here, as we have stated previously, but are worth repeating: 1. WRITING CAPACITY: Jeff and Jason are our main in house writers for RuneQuest, and Jason spends the majority of his time as the line editor. All the rest of the writing comes from freelance authors. Historically, Glorantha has always struggled to attract authors willing and capable of writing for it. That was true in 1980, 1990, 2000, 2010, and is also true today. Wishing for a Book on X or Y doesn't mean anyone is going to step up and want to write it. That is probably doubly true for the less documented areas of Glorantha. 2. ECONOMICS: We are very willing to publish any RuneQuest material that will sell well enough to pay the bills. Some topics though are far from mainstream interests. Yes, we have no doubt that there are fans out there who long to buy a book on X or Y, but many of those topics won't sell well enough for Chaosium to invest the resources (mainly money) for a full blown supplement. In many respects, that's what the Jonstown Compendium was created to help alleviate. Chaosium needs to produce material that will sell X thousand copies, not X hundred copies.
  9. 13 points
    Yes, I've written the cults of Pavis, Fintnail, and Zola Fel for RQG. But they will appear in the Pavis & Big Rubble materials, where they belong. I also have written cults of the Bloody Tusk, Daruda, Seseine, Glamour, Geo, loads of material on the Draconic religion, and the beginnings of an Invisible God chapter. But those will all appear in other books. This book covers Dragon Pass, Kethaela, Prax, and Peloria in great detail. From here you can work out the contours of much of the rest of Glorantha. Other than gods of the East Isles, Godunya, Path of Immanent Mastery, and Tskanth, I believe that every cult that was in the RQ3 Gods of Glorantha book is here. Long form. Like Cults of Prax or Cults of Terror. Plus so much more - Asrelia, Barntar, Caladra & Aurelion, Choralinthor, Danfive Xaron, Dayzatar, Deezola, Hon-eel, Oslira, Polaris, Shargash, Yara Aranis, Ygg, and so much more.
  10. 12 points
    We have no intention on letting Pendragon die, and want it a live game. Pendragon is one of my two favourite game systems of all time, and Greg's masterpiece of game design. We think a fully supported, fresh relaunch will give it the best opportunity for it to enjoy the success it dearly deserves.
  11. 11 points
    I am currently writing Secrets of Dorastor, which is an expanded writeup of elements of my Dorastor Campaign from years ago, but updated with extra things added. It will contain new locations, new powerful NPCs, new spells and a lot of scenario hooks. I have some high-level scenarios, but might take them out as they are probably too high-level for a Jonstown Compendium supplement. Also, I fully support a thread about Dorastor from someone named Dissolv, as I mention in Secrets of Dorastor "Try not to make everything acid as this gets boring after a while (Actually it doesn't - I never tire of hearing Players whinge about their precious iron dissolving and running down their legs!)".
  12. 10 points
    OK, I’ve just uploaded my new short RuneQuest scenario to the Jonstown Compendium: https://www.drivethrurpg.com/product/307504/The-Duel-at-Dangerford?affiliate_id=392988 It's called The Duel at Dangerford. The scenario itself is a couple of dozen pages long, and since only gamemasters and confirmed non-combatants are ever likely to pick it up, I thought it’d be a good place to share some colourful ideas I came up with for The Smoking Ruin and The Dragon of Thunder Hills as appendices. Rated the "Hottest Community Content" on DriveThruRPG! "This is wonderful. The absolute love for the setting hits you straight in the mouth." -- Michael Kirkbride, Concept Artist & Writer for Morrowind.
  13. 10 points
    I'm not very good at accents, so I generally don't do them very much. But my newtlings sound kind of like Winston Churchill. For some reason, my players LOVE this. They have actively begged me to have them run into newtlings so I'll have to do 'the Newtling Voice'.
  14. 9 points
    I Came across this forum and thread while looking for something else on google. It makes me feel awesome. Convinced to join the forum now, seems to be lots of useful tools and information here. Looking forward to bantering with you guys. (I am the artist btw)
  15. 9 points
    Pegasus Plateau is in layout. Gods of Glorantha is in final editing and art commissioning. The RQ Starter Set is written and going through editing. The GM book is still being written. Numerous other scenario and sourcebooks are still in the writing phase. Specific ETAs not given because we don't have them yet, although the Pegasus Plateau might be done with layout around the end of March.
  16. 9 points
    What do we mean by "thoroughly revised and expanded"? I'll tell you... The 1998 edition of the Rough Guide to Glamour (with red card covers: the most complete version) contained about 29,000 words. We have cut out a third of the book: sections either reprinted in or made redundant by the Glorantha Sourcebook (eg: The Lunar Pantheon, Dart Competitions & New Year Ceremony) and sections primarily written to support the freeform Reaching Moon Megacorp's Life of Moonson (eg: Recent History, a list of Sultanates, Provinces etc. and their rulers). So there are 20,000 words from the old Guide remaining. The Jonstown Compendium edition of the Guide contains more than 50,000 words. Most major sections are significantly expanded (eg: the Gazetteer is 60% longer, detailing 117 locations in Outer Glamour; the Rough Guide itself has two new pages on Holidays and Festivals). We have incorporated material from the Guide to Glorantha (a full writeup of the Silver Shadow Sultanate, with a new map by Colin Driver), from Tales of the Reaching Moon (Cult of the Red Emperor, Lunar Government, Satraps & Sultans, Letter from a Monopolist, A Visit to Glamour), and from the epic Yolanelathon (three interlinked stories by MOB and myself, presented at various conventions in the nineties but never collected under one cover). There is a new 4,000 word writeup of the Cult of Glamour by Jeff Richard, plus obscure rumours, fragments and oddities scattered throughout (eg: Antiquities of Old Glamour, Red Empire, Pelorian Rhapsody, Annual Dinner of the Lunar College of Magic). If you liked the original Rough Guide to Glamour, we think you'll like this version even more!
  17. 8 points
    Years ago I posted a few snippets about a small group of outer atomic explorers returning to Glorantha after being away for hundreds of years (since the second age). Hurtling down from the sky dome their ship crash lands into a small lake in the wastes, and they seek to find out where they are. They encounter humans who cannot speak, herded and hunted by inhuman masters. One of their party is killed, and is put on display in the khan's great tent. Another has his INT fixed and becomes a simple herd-man, unable to recognize his friend or speak of their past, including their journeys to the great darkness, where they swore oaths they did not understand, but ones that yielded them powers they sought. Only after escaping and finding his way down to the coast does Talar find answers to where he is and what happened to him. As he and his companion ride along the desolate shore they look up upon the crumbled and blasted remains of the crudely reconstructed watchdog of Corflu. Talar, who did not recognize the red moon in the sky, nor the fate of this blasted world, realizes he was home....
  18. 8 points
    The easiest way to answer the question is to actively play some Mythras RAW and see how it stacks up when compared with BRP. Create some characters - or use something prepared in one of the free scenarios we host on the TDM website and give it a go. Combat's Special Effects might seem intimidating, and if you're not used to them, they do create a different kind of play, but they do help speed-up combat. If analysis-paralysis is a concern, then choose a handful and limit choices to those. What Special Effects are designed to is remove the need for Hit Point attrition as a way of winning a fight: you simply don't have to slog away at the enemy until they stop moving. Effects offer a range of ways to put an opponent beyond being able to retaliate without a) penalising the attacker with negative modifiers for choosing a specific kind of action; b) offering some creative and cinematic ways of handling combat tactics. After one or two combat sessions, they become second-nature, but the best thing is to try them first. Of course, Mythras may not suit you or your group's playing style, and that's absolutely fine. But we always advise people who are feeling a little daunted to just give it a try. It's actually a very coherent, logical system that flows very well during play.
  19. 8 points
    Actually, picture Scrooge McDuck swimming in his money bin...
  20. 7 points
    The Corn Dolls: Sandheart Volume 2 is now live on DrivthruRPG. Thanks to Nick Brooke for all sorts of assistance, MOB for support and Diana Probst/Kris Herbert (Beer With Teeth) and for their advice/Sun Hawk art https://l.facebook.com/l.php?u=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.drivethrurpg.com%2Fproduct%2F307914%2FThe-Corn-Dolls-Sandheart-Volume-2%3Faffiliate_id%3D392988%26fbclid%3DIwAR0oDa55IRNiYQixicq049MxfdU_D-VLC-og5aMzlDnNdAbnWF3HzfGvR8g&h=AT2pHkFq11syxRCDOXtrCyaXHUs35kJDUIgXdW-hnMxqxlb_PR4cc4q3o74WL3GH0mveTBw95hE1oEXxJh-QXFwvagldmxGvZVZfaPZENR1gUSsjuETtjcNUpjSkza5654A
  21. 7 points
    Hey BRP Forums, I know it might be difficult to think about recreation right now, but there may be an argument for needing exactly that to keep our SAN manageable. So, I hope you can get a positive feeling from this.
  22. 7 points
    Out now in PDF - Investigate the Cthulhu Mythos during the Harlem Renaissance! Chris Spivey's ENnie-winning breakthrough book HARLEM UNBOUND is back and better than ever. Harlem Unbound 2nd Edition is expanded and improved from the first edition. New areas are shown below: —Seven scenarios (four new to 2nd Edition). —Unique occupations tailored to Harlem. —New Mythos monsters to terrify your players. —Ready-to-play investigators. —Random plot generator. —Crash course on addressing race in gaming. Start reading, start playing now! Buy the PDF from Chaosium now, and you get the full price of the PDF off the physical book when it is released later in the year. https://www.chaosium.com/harlem-unbound-2nd-edition-pdf
  23. 7 points
    I'd say the new Cults Book is a deep ocean.
  24. 7 points
    Pirates of Drinax for Traveller is one of the few classic sci-fi mega-campaigns. Pentallion converted most of it to M-Space. Now he’s collected his conversion advice in an article here: https://elruneblog.blogspot.com/2020/03/converting-pirates-of-drinax-to-m-space.html
  25. 7 points
    If people are interested, here's an update on where I am at with Secrets of Dorastor Introduction - Done Places - Done Personalities - Text done, but need to add Stat Blocks Bestiary - Text done, but need to add Stat Blocks Organisations - Done Cults - Done Effects - Done Treasures - Done Miscellaneous - Done Encounter Tables - WIP Scenarios - Text done, but need to add Stat Blocks and flesh some things out For Games Masters - Done Maps - Main map done, other maps WIP I have attached a table of Contents, as it is at the moment, without artwork and layout. Dorastor_TOC.txt
  26. 7 points
    Except that (temporary) shelter-in-place & self-isolation is the ONLY technique we have that is effective. (If we hadn't screwed up initial test-production, we might have tried that method, like S.Korea did (to good effect); but we're so far behind that curve we may not be ABLE to catch up even if we get test-production fixed). This is neither panic nor conspiracy, it's fundamental disease-control. It has been well-known for many years. We just haven't had to face the realities of logarithmic disease-spread for so long that it's striking people as an unreasonable imposition on their "god given rights." This isn't a civil-rights issue, it's a public-health emergency.
  27. 7 points
  28. 7 points
    Artwork from the forthcoming Call of Cthulhu supplement CHILDREN OF FEAR has been nominated for the 2020 Spectrum 27: Best in Contemporary Fantastic Art Awards. Congratulations to Sija Hong, whose 'The Three Lords of Shambhala' has been selected by the jury in the Book category. The winners will be announced at an awards ceremony in Kansas City, MO on Friday evening, March 20, 2020. http://spectrumfantasticart.com/blog/spectrum-27-awards-nominations
  29. 6 points
    In case of MYTHRAS and the Gateway License, substantial altering the MYTHRAS rules isn't allowed. You cannot simply strip out fundamental elements of the rules engine and keep calling it MYTHRAS. In the License document this is discussed under contractual clause 5 and gets a longer treatment in the FAQ section. It seems it would be better to leave MYTHRAS and its special Gateway License here completely out of focus, to avoid misunderstandings.
  30. 6 points
    The Tax Demons are stats
  31. 6 points
    The closest Gloranthan parallel may have been the First age - an empire led by a fatally flawed god of light, eventually torn down by a barbarian whose curse blighted the land and left a vast lake of dust and ash, where once stood farms and a beautiful city. Sounds like Egypt to me. The Sahara was not nearly as dry thousands of years ago as it is today. During the First Dynasty, 5000 years ago, Egypt was a lot wetter. The Great Pyramid was built during a period when Egypt was drying out, but was still wetter and more arable than today. Egyptian recordkeeping was good enough that some ancient scholars must have been aware their land was changing. Perhaps their great religious edifices were in part an attempt to bring back the rain. A debate is still ongoing about how much humans contributed to the drying. The 20,000 year wet / dry cycles predate human habitation, but some scientists think primitive agriculture may have accelerated the desertification which accompanied the great drying.
  32. 6 points
    Yes. Here's my notes, from the as-yet unpublished gazetteer about Casino Town: The Great House – the original manor of Talar Barat - is a two story round building in the centre of Casin Town. It houses the Faro Wheel, the strange artifact the Talar retrieved from the Clanking Ruins. The Faro’s visible workings can be viewed from the top of five small towers built around the perimeter, and gamblers congregate in them, jostling for position. Purely monetary bets are made with agents and runners for the various casinos and gambling houses, while those risking wagers of a magical or spiritual kind deal directly with the Faro Wheel staff. A hundred years ago, one of the viewing platforms was suddenly closed off without explanation. Some say this was done because punters there somehow got a unique and advantageous view of the workings of the wheel. There are always plots and schemes afoot by gamblers to see what it is that can be observed from this now forbidden vantage point. Harrek the Berserk smashed another viewing tower to rubble during his riotous visit of 1616. An inferior but larger platform was rebuilt (out of wood) by the Vadeli, and is square instead of round. Like the walls of the city itself, the walls of the Great House are smooth and featureless. The Great House’s massive iron doors have remained sealed ever since the Talar’s fateful game with Belintar in 1313. The few Brithini staff needed to operate the wheel leave and enter through the roof. (Next to the Great House is the Pool Hall: where drinkable water is piped from a well in the Great House to a covered pool, and by custom is free for all. The water arrives noticeably warm, and it is speculated it somehow cools the machinery of the Faro Wheel – certainly hot steam issued from the pipe during the Talor’s epic session with Belintar. The water also noticeably became warmer whenever the Tournament of Luck and Death took place at the City of Wonders. During the grim time of the Windstop, the flow slowed to a trickle, but the warmth of the water prevented the pipe from completely freezing up, saving many lives. The water tastes completely normal, but curiously Ludoch find bathing in it to be a euphoric experience. In the absence of an agora or university in Casino Town, teachers, philosophers and mathematicians congregate at the pool, along with frauds, mountebanks and conmen. They all share one thing in common: a desire to understand and beat the Faro Wheel (or a willingness to prey on those who do).
  33. 6 points
    So, I finally got the fillable PDF M-Space character sheet completed. I added a bit of art taken from the rulebook just to jazz up the character sheet. Time permitting I'll try and get the sheets (ships, alien lifeforms, etc.)made fillable too. Let me know if there are any issues with the character sheet, such as font size or repeating text boxes. It can be downloaded here: http://www.mediafire.com/file/6g6306hbyikahfg/M-Space_CS_Fillable.pdf/file
  34. 6 points
    Here I mention some advice to start running Mythras without feeling overwhelmed by the rules: https://elruneblog.blogspot.com/2019/04/review-of-mythras-roleplaying-game.html 😉
  35. 6 points
    Crabtown makes me think of Ald'ruhn from Elder Scrolls Morrowind, though here is the somewhat more updated Elder Scrolls Online version:
  36. 6 points
    Final draft manuscript ToC, just need 1 pic, 1 map and then we’re done.
  37. 6 points
    Final draft manuscript ToC, just need 1 pic, 1 map and then we’re done.
  38. 6 points
    I'm not sure about Illumination, but something turned people into monsters in this thread.
  39. 6 points
    There's only one Chaosium staffer that I will listen to on this subject.
  40. 6 points
    Bah, as I have told Nick many times, we all know that Elvis was Magnificus. Argenteus on the other hand is Telly Savalas.
  41. 6 points
    Sure! The 1998 edition of the Rough Guide to Glamour (with red card covers: the most complete version) contained about 29,000 words. We have cut out a third of the book: sections either reprinted in or made redundant by the Glorantha Sourcebook (eg: The Lunar Pantheon, Dart Competitions & New Year Ceremony) and sections primarily written to support the freeform Reaching Moon Megacorp's Life of Moonson (eg: Recent History; a list of Sultanates, Provinces etc. and their rulers). So there are 20,000 words from the old Guide remaining. The Jonstown Compendium edition of the Guide contains more than 50,000 words. Most major sections are significantly expanded (eg: the Gazetteer is 60% longer, detailing 117 locations in Outer Glamour; the Rough Guide itself has two new pages on Holidays and Festivals). We have incorporated material from the Guide to Glorantha (a full writeup of the Silver Shadow Sultanate, with two new maps by Colin Driver), from Tales of the Reaching Moon (Cult of the Red Emperor, Lunar Government, Satraps & Sultans, Letter from a Monopolist, A Visit to Glamour), and from the epic Yolanelathon (three interlinked stories by MOB and myself, presented at various conventions in the nineties but never collected under one cover). There is a new 4,000 word writeup of the Cult of Glamour by Jeff Richard, plus obscure rumours, fragments and oddities scattered throughout (eg: Antiquities of Old Glamour, Red Empire, Pelorian Rhapsody, Annual Dinner at the Lunar College of Magic). If you liked the original Rough Guide to Glamour, we think you'll like this version even more!
  42. 6 points
    Am still working on 'Men of the West' Seshnela chapter. Am avoiding details of sorcery 'schools' because I know those are under development. Now about 38 pages (Brithos, Hsunchen, Seshnela) and the more I 'discover' [make up] the less medieval Europe Seshnela seems, even with its feudal system (and there have been several non-European feudal systems). Of course the semi-tropical coastal climate is a factor, and I have just had fun writing about Seshnelan fortifications, which differ in construction from those detailed in Armies & Enemies for central Genertela. One of the Kickstarter RQ special books had a very faint and barely readable pencil diagram of one of Arkat's battles, which contributes to what Seshnegi knights were like. If I am reading it correctly, they rode over troops on their own side to get at the enemy... One of those books has a single page of Arkat, Gerlant, and Talor approaching Kartolin mounted on goats. Am wondering if that fragment is what has been mentioned to me as Talor's Saga, as he certainly laughs a lot. I probably need to start thinking about Fronela next. There's significant detail in the Guide, so will have to see how much needs to be invented.
  43. 6 points
    Most people know I have dabbled in collecting Chaosium games...
  44. 6 points
    There is clearly a huge surge in Glorantha podcasts as we are soon releasing our second episode of Finnish Glorantha podcast Dayzatarin tähtien alla (Under the stars of Dayzatar). In our first episode we reviewed Armies and Enemies of Dragon Pass and soon we release the second episode about RuneQuest: Roleplaying in Glorantha. We have been joking that we are the only Glorantha podcast (as far as we know) in the world. It is nice to hear we now have company! We will definitely give you a shoutout in our next episode.
  45. 6 points
    For having no math, that’s a lot of math.
  46. 6 points
    Yeah, I don't want to come off as dismissive, but I *really* think it would be useful for people to read a bit up on Dharmic (Buddhist, Hindu) conception of enlightenment and awakening ("bodhi/buddhi"). It doesn't have to be super-indepth, just scratch a bit in some of the basics. Warning: the below might not represent 100% what rules present in source books, I don't know, but it's the very strong impression I get from Greg's writing on mysticism and illumination overall: Illumination is not about deductive reasoning and logics. While Buddhism contains lots of logical stuff in and of itself (it has some interesting material philosophy which is reminiscent of Aristotle's writings, iirc., and it quite brutally applies logic to the idea of a soul in the concept of "anatta", for example), mystic enlightenment in the dharmic tradition is at its heart alogical (not "illogical", as in anti-logical, but rather alogical in the sense that logic or illogic is entirely irrelevant, imho). It's not some kind of reasoned conclusion one makes after thinking about something for a bit. It's experiential, transformative, and quite often traumatic. Someone mentioned Plato's cave allegory earlier, and it's actually a pretty decent introduction to this whole thing; Plato's whole point is that if you tried to logically explain the outside of the cave to the people in there, they would think you were insane, because their minds literally cannot comprehend what you're talking about, and you also quite likely lack the means to communicate your observations. They have to leave the cave to understand this too. It must be experienced. As for the conclusion, I once again would like to mention anatta. I previously mentioned "anatta" as being a logical examination of the soul. This is only halfway true. Anatta postulates that there is actually no soul, no self, to "I", these are all affectations of the active mind-process, as we attempt to create a perceptional pattern around ourselves so as to not feel like we're treading water above an infinite abyss of endlessly complex and undifferentiated everything/nothing. This is something you can put into words: "Actually, the mind is just the self-referential emergent pattern of neural cells communicating. It doesn't exist as a thing in and of itself." Okay, great, what then? Logic only takes you so far. Now comes the mystic/enlightenment side in: imagine experiencing this and seeing for yourself that you don't actually exist and neither does anything else either. THAT'S transformative. THAT's illuminating. In the context of Glorantha, the "We Are All Us" is not only an expression of the Lunar Empire having an integrating policy and the Lunar religion accepting donvertees from anywhere, it's also about how everything in the Cosmos is existentially connected and at its most basic level they are just blips or winnows emerging from the primordial Chaotic origin of us all. We are all, quite literally, Us, because fundamentally, any distinctions are stripped away. Presumably other mystic traditions have similar, but different, takes on it all. Draconic mysticism and Rune-focused mystic traditions (like the Stormwalk renunciates or whoever), might arrive at slightly different conclusions, but the unifying point about them all is that while teaching, instruction and explanation might be useful tools to approach illumination, at the end of it all, it's something that has to be experienced for it to bloom fully. When explaining Illumination/enlightenment we are usually left with very inadequate metaphors, because by its nature, it eludes being captured. This is why Zen Buddhism, for example, employs "koans", which are logic-shattering aphorisms or stories meant to prepare the inductee for the seeming impossibilities and alogical experiences of illumination/enlightenment, and to teach them how fragile a worldview based on strict logical consistency is. The Gloranthan expy of koans is famously the Nysaloran riddles, although as with a lot of things, their effectiveness has been dialed up to 11. To circle back to Plato's cave analogy, the koan/riddle essentially serves to make people aware of the cracks in the cave, and might lead them towards trying to leave it. I assume the experiential necessity is partly the reason for why we see so many illuminated adventurers in Glorantha, proportionally, at least. Heroquesters and others who delve deep into the God Time and Heroplane are exposed to not only the cracks more often and more intensely than others, but may also inadvertently come into connection with the Absolute/All more as well. How this translates rules-wise is probably up to how people want to simulate, and it would be incorrect to say that most heroquesters, sorcerers, priests, or even mystics end up illuminated, but they're probably on the higher end statistically compared to most others. Also it's a nice excuse for your characters to end up illuminated without feeling like a Gary Stu. Anyway, that's the best I can do in putting it into words, which is somewhat ironic after spending so much time writing about how it cannot be put into words. (I am also not myself a practicioner of any trascendent techniques, just casually interested.)
  47. 5 points
    I am Rick Meints, and I don't use a spreadsheet to track my collection! 🙂
  48. 5 points
    I am saddened that you have such a narrow view of humanity, Darius. Variety is amazing across the world and across time. Every individual has their own morality, grown out of informational and experiential inputs. Since no individual will have precisely the same inputs, they inevitably have specific outcomes. This is at least as much the case culturally as personally. The reaction to the murder of in-group members has nothing to do with punishment, but much to do with fear and deterrence. Torture is sloppy and of little use for reliable information extraction, but some cultures do view it as acceptable while others don't. Consider, on a simple financial issue, usury. Much of the world regards it as reprehensible, much as acceptable, some as admirable. That is variation, not hypocrisy.
  49. 5 points
    I disagree with much of the larger post, and agree with some, but this cannot go unchallenged! All cultures do not agree on morality, and to suggest that differences are due to hypocrisy is simply wrong. Cultures differ profoundly - some have accepted torture as all part of the process of information gathering - some that murder was acceptable provided it was not concealed - others that vast private wealth in the presence of grinding poverty is okay - others that women do not have the same rights as men. To suggest that they were/are hypocrites simply because they differ from my morality is nonsense. They were/are the normative position in their culture. Disagreement is all part of the process of change.
  50. 5 points
    The demographics have changed. Back in the 80's and 90's the market were mostly school and college age kids. We kept gaming. The new wave of gamers coming in behind us are 20-30 something types who learned from us old hands. Expectations have changed. There was an attempt to keep things cheap and cheerful with those gods awful (IMHO) paperback style books for HQ. RQG, CoC etc have outsold them in gorgeous hard back volumes many times over. The market doesnt want cheap and cheerful it wants lush, well illustrated game books that are high quality. Instead of buying massively expensive coffee table books to decorate our living rooms we buy game books and have our old gaming mates over to sit round the table with products we'd have killed for in the 80's.
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