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uglifruit

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About uglifruit

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    Member
  • Birthday 03/22/1972

Converted

  • RPG Biography
    Dnd'd many many years ago, then Call Of Cthulhu'd (2nd edition). Read a lot of source material in the meantime, and back Call Of Cthulhu ing (7e), and a little Trail Of Cthulhu.
  • Current games
    CoC 7e, as keeper - with some friends who are beginners to RPGs.
  • Location
    Leicester, UK
  • Blurb
    Live in the East Midlands, UK.
    Do geeky music things with ZX Spectrums, and record, compose, gig and teach less geeky music generally. Also make Teletext Art in my spare time.

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  1. I think this is exactly where I am trying to be careful. I know my players (socially) very well, and can probably predict which of them (there's one in particular) who would probably not enjoy a 'peep behind the curtain'. Weirdly this makes me think of Stage Magic, of which I am a fan. Regardless of knowing how a lot of tricks are 'done' - I can still enjoy (or criticise) the execution, whereas I think some people have stage magic completely ruined by knowing the mechanics of a trick, even if they think that they want to know.
  2. Thanks everyone - these are all great points to consider.
  3. After running a scenario to completion, how much do you let your players see "behind the curtain". Do you let them know, if they didn't already realise, which lesser god was pulling the strings? Do you let them know about plot threads they missed? Do you let them know which of the n.p.c.s were made up on the spot, because they'd done something unexpected? Or do you just nod and smile knowingly, and let them assume everything was Just As You Planned?
  4. Spent money I can ill afford on this. Very much looking forward to it.
  5. Do you find spending luck to modify rolls only makes sense within a Campaign-type setting (where Luck becomes a resource that the Investigators might want to hold back?).
  6. Perfectly reasonable. Perhaps the Starter Set rules/guidance should make this explicit. I'm certainly not criticising the excellent price point/value of the Starter Set.
  7. Thanks Mike. I do understand that reasoning, I just think that a new Keeper needs to be aware of the implication of giving out the handouts/maps that are given. I'd fear that in helping the Keeper by providing those maps they could hand them out and slightly telegraph important plot. Hopefully most new Keepers are as nervous as I was/am, and eagerly read other Keeper's reports before running a session. This was very helpful to me, and I'm hopeful that my reports might be similarly helpful in some small way to other new Keepers.
  8. I think it is a case of "forewarned is forearmed". The fact I was running my session via Zoom rather than face to face, (and the fact I'm new to this Keeper role) made me prep A LOT and consider what the players might take away from everything I said/gave them. Not matching Keys on maps is a bit unforgivable. As I said, I'd always prefer maps with redacted Keys I can give to the players as I see fit (and certainly not populated with n.p.c.s that I may or may not choose to use).
  9. Spoilers abound here, for Dead Man's Stomp, and for Edge Of Darkness to some degree (the third and second scenarios from the Starter Set respectively). This will probably make little sense unless you've read the DMS scenario. So this is the third of the three Starter Set scenarios I've been running for some new players - and by far the one that asks the most of the Keeper. I decided I wanted to link this scenario to the first two, if possible - despite the different locale. I suggested that in playing Dead Man's Stomp it'd be interesting to have a Black investigator (given the recent i
  10. Some thoughts and some things I think would improve a new Keeper's experience (based upon my play through). The Call Of Cthulhu Starter Set, at just over £20 directly from Chaosium + postage, definitely represents good value. One could argue that Alone Against The Flames and the Quick Start Rules are available as free pdfs - but having printed versions is definitely a boon. Within the box you really do have (almost) everything required for many hours of running games - and enough of a flavour of 'how it works' to build your own scenarios if that appeals. The contents: Alo
  11. I've posted this photo to our Whatsapp group and the players. My players loved it (and are devastated that they've realised the gunshots were post-death, and that she was engaged). (The Toe-tag I downloaded for free from https://www.hplhs.org/resources.php plus a stock image of body + filters)
  12. Yes, I think they did have a good time. Interesting how the two sessions that this scenario spanned played out so differently - with the second one being Action! Danger! Guns! Zombies! Peril! ... but the first session was a much more considered investigation, with the players obviously revelling in the freedom of exploring Arkham. Afterwards one player said how much he enjoyed the action of the last session (perhaps he's more inclined towards the Pulp variant), whereas the other two probably favoured the less crunchy, more character based role-playing of the first session. I do think th
  13. Well - two more sessions down and we've tackled The Edge Of Darkness (the old classic, as included in the new Starter Set). My three investigators fleshed out the backstories before we before this one began. We learned a bit more who Luke Chan (widowed), Rupert Knuckles (cook) and Heath (socialite) were. Again my players through themselves into this really well. Some gentle nudging of questions ("Who's back home?" "Are you married?" "Who do you care about?") and they were becoming more human characters that emerged. Into the scenario itself - the three investigators were asked t
  14. Thank you both, and I'll certainly take a look at The Auction, with those 7e conversion/update notes.
  15. I'm new here - so apologies if I'm posting in the wrong place - or not spoilering things I should be. I've not RPG'd for a long while, but with lockdown upon us it seemed it'd be a good idea to try my an RPG via Zoom with 3 regular boardgame pals. I decided CoC would be my weapon of choice, having played it waaay back (and I don't really like Orcs, Goblins, etc). My group are not previously role players at all - but are keen boardgames (preferring quite heavy eurogames), so I knew this would be a little out of their comfort zone. I rpg'd years ago regularly, but haven't played for ages - b
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