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mvincent

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About mvincent

  • Rank
    Senior Member

Converted

  • RPG Biography
    Call of Cthulhu player (since the start) and Cult of Chaos member.
  • Current games
    Call of Cthulhu
  • Location
    Portland, Oregon
  • Blurb
    I have an affinity for miniatures and props.

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  1. Oddly, I kinda dislike the 'feel" of random tables too. Still, a neatly organized list of ideas, by category, seems useful. I mean, if there were say, ten ideas per category, and they used numbered bulleting, that might give some Keepers ideas too...
  2. NWI was featured prominently in "At Your Door" (90's modern scenario). Easter-Egg: it features a special child that seems to be born in the year that the next Brotherhood-child was foretold in "Day of the Beast'".
  3. But I was referencing your quote. The section alludes to non-zero HP monsters being reduced to unconsciousness, which would make one wonder how to do that without the major-wound unconsciousness rule? Also note: use of the term "Character" does not necessarily denote a semantic intent to treat PC's differently from foes, especially since NPC's (like Nyarlathotep, Mr. Shiney, etc.) are semantically Characters too.
  4. CoC 7e p.125 reads: "The standard rules already allow for a target to be knocked unconscious: when an attack inflicts a Major Wound (an amount of damage equal to or greater than half the target’s hit points), the target must make a CON roll to remain conscious. Also a target that is reduced to zero hit points will fall unconscious automatically." The p.282 section your quoted seems to corroborate that monsters use these unconsciousness rules: "Some monsters (when reduced to unconsciousness or zero hit points) may appear to be dead, only to rise again moments or hours later"
  5. Certainly: monsters should be able to take Major wounds. Anything with a 100+ CON won't be falling unconscious though. fwiw: I recommend the (p.126) rule that applies armor to each die of shotgun damage.
  6. I'm partial to #1, but I'd be concerned about balance. Maybe generic templates (including stats, damage, armor etc.) for each monster category (minor/medium/major?), with random tables for flavor items (like form of attack, appearance, goals, special abilities, etc.). The point being: static crunch would allow me to run a monster quickly/easily, while random fluff would make me feel freer with selections and flavor (without worrying about balance).Ideally, the table should be quick to use (if I had plenty of time to make up a monster, I probably wouldn't even need the table).
  7. Ah: I misread (and thought your group had just completed Derbyshire). In that case, I'd let your group decide: they'd probably opt to check out Misr House first (assuming they are aware of the moon timing), but even if they check out Derbyshire first, they might decide (in order not to waste weeks waiting around) to leave, check out Misr House, then return. If you're worried that they'll want to leave England after checking out Misr house;. missing Derbyshire doesn't necessarily seem like a bad thing, but if you still really want them to go to Derbyshire afterward, you could then tell them their ship does not leave until well after the full moon anyway.
  8. Travel arrangements (and waiting for the ship) might take several days. If the players know of an event happening during a new moon, they probably won't have issue an with waiting for it to investigate (since it likely won't delay them anyway). Indeed, it might be handy that they've made their travel arrangements before investigating (possibly for travelling the day after the new moon even), so they can leave quickly (to avoid authorities and recapture some of the rushed feeling).
  9. Do you mean a SAN roll for a "Reality Check"? (7e p.162)
  10. No, but I can see the confusion, since the normal rules don't have hit locations, yet indicates armor applies only when the damage passes through it. Probably best to assume Full military body armor includes a helmet, so you don't have to deal with hit locations. 12 points is still pretty darn amazing armor that many Mythos creatures are unlikely to scratch. It still probably won't save you though, in the end. I've actually seen that in GURPS, D&D, MMUD's, MMORPG's... it seems fairly common in RPG's that combine helmets with an absence of hit locations (which CoC does). Armor pieces in those systems often add a small amount each to your overall armor value (CoC does not do that... but it's hard to find where the rules indicate such).
  11. Correct... and to be fair: your character will probably go temporarily insane at that point anyway. I've just not encountered adventures where those were the sole (or even main) opportunities to use combat skills. Thanks for the lead on 'Trail of the Loathsome Slime'.
  12. Which adventures are you thinking of? I hear this frequently (and have even advanced the notion myself), but after running several hundred sessions (using the most popular adventures), I haven't found this to be the case... there always seems to be some cultists or other killable things that are best dealt with pro-actively.
  13. I agree: Spot Hidden, Dodge, Persuade or Fast-talk, Library use, Psychology I also want to add: Firearms: Rifle/Shotgun, as most scenarios tend to involve combat (despite some thinking they shouldn't), and 4d6 x2 (or 2d6+4 from a distance) becomes your best defense. Another tip: Spot Hidden tends to be used a lot (you're investigators, after all), so your fellow players might already have it at high levels. Some players might be able to save points (and SAN) by skipping it...
  14. Excellent! I sometimes hear purists say that CoC was not intended to be played with miniatures... but then I point to those silhouettes that were included with the original game. Sandy Peterson loves miniatures.
  15. That is a good point, but I think the point of the term is that while we might comprehend the nature of the singularity, a human brain wouldn't be able to comprehend advancements/changes once AI's start making them at an exponential rate. Imagine the last thousand years of change being compressed into minutes. Take a short nap and you'd wake up in a completely alien world. I don't event want to think of what a million years of that might result in.
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