Khedrac

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About Khedrac

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  • RPG Biography
    AD&D 1&2, BECM D&D, Traveller 1&4, Gamma World, AH RQ3, RoleMaster, Morrow Project, D&D 3&3.5, Gurps, Lost Souls, Call of Cthulhu, Elric and probably some I forget
  • Current games
    D&D3.5
  • Location
    Andover, UK
  • Blurb
    I wanna go back to Gorantha (blast - doesn't quite fit the Tom Lehrer tune).
  1. I always thought that the humans (well Waha) definitely cheated, but somnehow the Morocanth still won, which strongly suggests they managed to cheat better...
  2. A simple way in RQ3 to deal with this is simply extra opponents. The BRP/RQ combat mechanism makes 2 on one fighting very dangerous as it is nigh imposible to defend against 2 people at once (unless you can split your parry or dodge it is dodge one, parry the other and not attack). So 2 skill 45% opponents are a fair match for one 90% skill character - he can either quickly kill one while hoping the other misses him (which is the technique where one has lots of armour, magic or mundane so hits are unlikely to get through); or he can split his (or her) skill and take both on at one at even skills. Now, most 90+% skilled characters probably do have armour points to spare, and probably can ignore low skill human oppostion (unless they get a lucky crit), but consider trolls or other high-strength races - even an incompetent troll can do huge damage if they connect - that blow needs to be negated somehow...
  3. Thank-you, that is really good news. I like the idea of sorcery, and would love to have a working set of rules, but I agreed with those who said that the RQ3 rules didn't work. I also liked Sandy Petersen's suggested revised rules, but they required far more set-up and planning for any NPC users, even if they were more viable for actual PCs... As such, I think I can write RQ3 sorcery off as "not a great loss".
  4. I really must try and get round to getting my copy then... I originally contributed in the Kickstarter enough for a PDF copy but for various reaosns never actually sorted out registering and downloading it. That's a good question, at this late date is it still possible to track my original contribution and sort out my acquisition?
  5. THis is encouraging, but as someone who missed RQ2 (I picked up the Moon Design reprints), what would you estimate the Avalon Hill RQ compatability to be? 80% or higher?
  6. Tatters of the King is the major adventure path for Carcosa and the King in Yellow. Been there, done that, didn't come back because my character went insane just at the last minute...
  7. I think that may have depended on what you already knew about Glorantha... For me (in the UK) what complicated things was that the core Glorthantha information (i.e. what was in book 5 of the Deluxe box - things like the Chaos Feature table) wasn't readily available. The primary available version of RQ3 in the UK was the Games Workshop re-book which was basically Deluxe RQ without the Glorantha bits. The Deluxe box was available, but it was rare and it was not obvious that you needed it. At school we playing in Fantasy Europe, and didn't have any problems. At University (where there was a running group Glorantha campaign) my first GM used his own world maps for the initial major campaign arc (because he didn't have access to a Glorantha map) and then threw us a "200-year jump" to put us in the common Glorantha at the end of it (as now he did). About the only genuine Gloranthan material used for that first camapign arc was the deities - because Gods of Glorantha was available. People have complained that it didn't really give the "feel" of Glorantha because the cult descriptions were too short. I would revise this - it didn't give the feel of Greg's Glorantha; for those of us who had no other Glorantha material it gave a definite wonderful new and different feel that to us was "Glorantha", there had been nothing like it before (if you had never seen 2nd Ed.). The other early Glorantha products were of much less use, Elder Secrets definitely had interesting bits, but most of it was only of limited applicability to any given campaign (starting with the point it makes that if the party gains decent contacts with any elder race the others will avoid them - means you only get to use one section at a time). The Genertela box had huge amounts of brief information (the main thing we used it for were starting skill bases) but a number of them (e.g. mine) had a large block of pages missing with another block re-printed in their place (thankfully a friend was able to give my photocpoies of the pages from his book - and if anyone tried to sue of copyright grounds I will point out that I have a fully legal right to those pages from my copy, I just don't actually have the originals). Etc. I now have a copy of book 5 (I managed to buy Deluxe RQ second hand, though it came in 2 boxes not 1), and I would say that publishing the standard RQ without the Glorantha book was a major impediment to developing Glorantha later, but those of us who were new to RQ were quite happy gaming in Mythic Europe. Look also at AD&D at the time - Forgotten Realms was coming out, Greyhawk was out, but unless you read Dragon you had no information beyond the boxed set. Most games operated in the DM's own creation. Mythic Europe had some huge advantages as a world - everyone had a fair idea of the map and what the countries might be!
  8. That's Avebury not Stonehenge - it's a much bigger ring (most of the village is inside it) but there are no cross stones on top. There's about 20 miles apart so I suppose that is close enough for someone in the Severn Vale. Actually - I remember this story form the year they posted it - nice find!
  9. That has got to be the best April Fool's announcement I have seen this year, it's awesome. Seriously though, there are a lot of good reasons for assuming hoax without knowing the date. For me the primary two are orientation and style; the Uffington White Horse is actually one of lots of White Horses in the area (growing up to me White Horse meant the one at Westbury) but nearly all the others are much more realistic, to miss-quote Tery Pratchett the Uffington White Horse isn't a carving of a horse but a carving of the spirit of a horse - now compare the horse to their projected duck - the duck is much more realistic and yet they are so close together I cannot buy the idea of two different tribes so why the total difference of styles? Secondly, though it is hard to judge from their aerial shots, I think the duck would be on its back when viewed from a distance...
  10. Tatters of the King is a large adventure centred around stopping the King in Yellow coming to Earth - will that do? Note: - I played it as a player and I think we all enjoyed it, though my character didn't 'come back' from the end (rolling 00 on a SAN check when into single digit SAN got the GM to pull me aside and tell me my charachter was now trying to help bring about the King's arrival).
  11. Just to make life more confusing, this misses a publisher - Games Workshop. Avalon Hill (well I assume it was them) licensed Games Workshop to produce hardback book versions of their boxed sets for the UK. These books are also usually regarded as RQ3 and are the same version of RQ, just slightly differently arranged. They seemed concentrated on the Fantasy Europe setting because the Glorantha booklet from the Delux box set(s) was not included in the re-ordered core rulebooks (Basic Runequest and Advanced Runequest).
  12. Right, there's a difference between a boosted spell and a higher power spell. For example, take a typical variable spell like bladesharp. Bladesharp V costs 5 magic points and adds 5 to damage and 25% to your attack chance. A Dispel Magic II will fail to affect it but a Dispel Magic V will dispel it. Bladesharp II costs two magic points and 2 to damage and 10% to attack chance. A Dispel Magic II will dispel it. Bladesharp II backed by 3 magic points costs 5 magic points and adds 2 to damage and 10% to your attack chance. A Dispel Magic II will fail to affect it but a Dispel Magic V will dispel it. So, if you want more than +10% and 2 damage you need more than 2 points of Bladesharp in memory - assuming you can 1) find a teacher, 2) afford the cost) and 3) have spare memory to learn the spell. If you don't need more two points then yes, just learn Bladesharp II and back it with magic points when you need dispel protection. The ability to twist a Bladesharp I into a Bladesharp VI (possibly lasting longer as well) is Lunar magic (basically sorcery for spirit magic) and is a very different thing. The skill that is equivalent to Intensity is Amplify and allows for increasing the number of points of effect without increasing the number known.
  13. The fanzine Enclosure (issue 2, May 1998) has a cult writeup by Jeff Erwin. I also am sure I have a "Yinkin Ratcatcher" variant somewhere (just a few lines) for a city-based sub-cult.
  14. Yes, and again no. In Tolkein's Middle Earth the Maiar (and to an extent the Valar) are not beyond 'mortals' in power. They are beyond most in power, but not all. Sauron (when he had all of his power) turned himself into a werewolf in order to fight a dog and lost. Yes, he was beaten by a dog, OK one that was foretold to lose to the greatest wolf ever, but still. For that matter this implies that said wolf (which Morgoth had raised) was also tougher than Sauron... Elrond is probably a better healer than Gandalf (OK Gandalf definitely is limited in what he can do) - but so probably is Aragon. Morgoth came very close to losing when he dueled an elf king (I forget which - Fingolfin?) Feanor created things beyond the ability of any of the Valar. All that said, I agree that magic is usually "off stage" in Tolkein's Middle Earth which makes it hard to balance in a game. Most magic is the fashioning of items (from the Silmarils through the rings of power down to the Arnor daggers from the barrow) There is very little actual casting of spells.
  15. nclarke good warning - thank-you