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Umpherous Vermillion

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About Umpherous Vermillion

  • Rank
    Newbie

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  • RPG Biography
    Been playing CoC since 1981.
  • Current games
    Cthulhu & D&D 5th ed
  • Location
    Florida
  • Blurb
    Moved to playing online (Roll20 or Fantasy Grounds) with gaming chums.

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  1. This post cannot be displayed because it is in a password protected forum. Enter Password
  2. If you want to create something historical-fictional, then set it in Betham's Panopticon (planned but not made in England): https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Panopticon It's a creepy idea but made with Utilitarian intentions. Would fit with Victorian theme nicely. Bentham's work helped inspire Robert Peel's first police force (Robert=Bob=Bobbies). And has an Orwellian vibe, ala the sociologist Michel Foucault https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Panopticism:
  3. How to make scary and intrigue players? 1. Handouts. You cannot underestimate the effect of hand-made handouts. Even playing online, a well-crafted image can really create atmosphere. Like so: 2. Slow reveals. I learned this from a friend. If you slow down the action and describe the horror in detail, then you increase the verisimilitude. For example: "You open the bedroom door and see two sleeping figures under the covers in the sliver of light from the opened door. One male; one female. You step in closer, careful not to make noise. You pause to check if either is breathing... the male figure's torso rises and falls rhythmically. You detect a faint rasp of breath. But the female shape is stone still. Taking one step closer, you note a circular discoloration around the female form. Blood?
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  5. Funny, I had the same thought. I had a Norwegian professor transporting a stone tablet with Norse pictographs and a crystal embedded in the center. The crystal later becomes the creature and kills the professor who had opened the crate with the tablet in it. In addition to the tablet, I had a file of correspondence between the professor and an American lab. As the investigators came upon the 'crime scene' in the hold, I had biohazard stickers on the door of the hold as well as the crate. My goal was to add a layer of uncertainty to the 'hunt'. It didn't really help the investigators but I thought it added to the mystery and I think they enjoyed a bit more back story. They certainly studied the clues to look for anything that could help.
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