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lawrence.whitaker

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Everything posted by lawrence.whitaker

  1. John M Greer is the author... 😉
  2. System-wise, there are distinct similarities: Same characteristics - 3-18 range Hit Points per Location Percentile Skills Passions Cults Detailed Combat Lower & Higher Magic forms Creatures with full stats, so playable as characters within reason and some bounds But there are differences within the common elements. Mythras differs here: No General Hit Points Mythras uses Luck Points and Action Points Skill values based on sum of two characteristics (or a single characteristic x2) Different spread and handling of skills: Crits on 1/10th skill value, no Special Success, no Resistance Table Passions augment skills without having to roll, and don't risk reducing a skill if failed Combat takes a very different approach to resolution with a lot more tactical options and the use of Special Effects No Strike Ranks - Mythras uses weapon size and reach instead Magic works very differently. Five systems: Folk Magic, Animism, Theism, Mysticism and Sorcery - all fully detailed, but with different approaches and effects Another underlying difference that may not be so evident is the design philosophy behind the Mythras rules. It's not based on RQ2 to the same extent as RQ:G, and therefore a lot design choices and decisions move away from design decisions that underpin RQ2 (such as the Resistance Table). But the two games have a common heritage and thus a lot in common. Mythras is a toolkit that requires some thought from the GM, whereas RQ:G is tied to Glorantha and thus has that consistent reference point throughout. As David Scott suggests, take a look at Mythras Imperative which gives you a very good idea of the system, and showcases the differences I've outlined above.
  3. The giantess Tadc and her bear companion, Terrorpaw, have seized a group of terrified villagers and hold them in Tadc's lair. A rescue party has been assembled to free the villagers and end the giantess's reign of fear over the land. The third in our series of Combat Training modules, Brace Yourself deals with fighting creatures. Both the foes in this module (the giantess Tadc and her bear companion Terrorpaw) are larger and stronger than the characters, and use different tactics when fighting. They therefore require a different approach if they are to be defeated. Brace Yourself! explores the options available to both players and GMs, and shows how different fighting styles can be used to handle multiple foes simultaneously. It also shows the importance of terrain and advantageous positioning - useful things to exploit no matter what size the opponent. As with all the Combat Modules in this series, Brace Yourself! includes a tactical map and downloadable tokens for use at the table or in a virtual tabletop environment such as Roll20 or Fantasy Grounds. Brace Yourself! Is $3.99 for the PDF, or $9.99 for the POD edition (with free PDF and tokens, and available via Lulu and DrivethruRPG). TDM Lulu DrivethruRPG
  4. Likely the end of the year. All the artwork is in, and Sophia is working on the layout, so progress is good, but it won't be a Fall release. We'll naturally release a preview nearer the time.
  5. Hopefully the author, Paul StJohn Mackintosh, will be along to answer some of these questions. He's on vacation at the moment, but he's aware of the interest.
  6. Mythras also has a flip mechanic using Luck Points. '00' is always a failure and a fumble, and no amount of flipping will help you. However, if you roll 10, you can flip to gain 01.
  7. Your order is being despatched from Lulu, and a whole bunch of books have just gone out. With your order details I can check to see if you're among them and forward your tracking #.
  8. PM me your order details (if you ordered through us) and we can check status.
  9. We have a Mythic Constantinople scenario, 'The Curse of Triton' in pre-production, and are also hoping to see some Mythic Babylon support not too far behind it.
  10. Mythras treats a weapon's damage-reducing abilities when used to parry or block, separately from the weapon's own resistance to damage. It also bases damage-reducing abilities on the relative sizes of the attacking and parrying weapons. This means that a character armed with a dagger (size Small) just isn't going to inflict any damage at all on someone parrying with a kite shield (size Huge), but would inflict some damage on an opponent parrying with a shortsword (size Medium). The default position Mythras adopts is that, in general use, weapons don't break as frequently as they might in say older iterations of RQ, and for that reason doesn't have rules for weapon attrition when used for parrying successful blows. Of course in reality, bronze blades are more brittle than iron ones, and iron more brittle than steel - but we decided to forgo such fine distinctions in favour of a simpler approach where all metal weapons are treated in much the same way. It is a compromise, but it also simplifies book-keeping because one doesn't need to worry about how many Hit Points your weapons lose when used to do something they're designed to do, in the hands of people trained to use them (which is another important factor in weapon breakage). However, it is possible to target a weapon directly, making it, rather than the wielder, the focus of an attack, and so Mythras has rules for this under its Sunder mechanic. Some weapons have Sunder as an available Special Effect, and these tend to be weapons designed for inflicting lots of damage (a greataxe, say) and/or being equipped with specialised surfaces (such as the spike of certain polearms) to puncture armour and shields. Damaging weapons in Mythras is therefore a deliberate, rather than an incidental act, but there are certainly rules for it. Sunder is very useful if an attacking character is being kept at range by an opponent within a longer weapon (a spear or pike, for instance). It may be an effective tactic to attack the weapon and damage it beyond use, allowing the attacker to then close with the (now disarmed) opponent. For Lloyd's situation, where shields or other protection degrade when absorbing or ablating damage, it would be quite simple to give certain weapons the Sunder trait, meaning that whenever a shield is used to defend against them, their Hit Point value reduces if the shield's Armour Points are overcome. It's really all about defining what certain weapons can do when coming up against certain defensive types. Lloyd likes this fine level of detail, so assuming the additional book-keeping isn't an issue, then using the Mythras Sunder mechanics might be a solution to consider.
  11. I really don't have any ideas. Way above my expertise where the tech is concerned. I have seen differences in quality between PDF engines though. I've tried Foxit, Wondershare, Acrobat, GoodReads and a couple of others and they've all had varying results.
  12. It's odd that your Preview should give such a fuzzy result. Mine (BigSur on my M1 Mac Mini, and High Sierra on my mid 2010 Macbook Pro) both give pretty clear renders, similar to Raleel's.
  13. Not sure what your screen settings are, or which PDF reader you're using, but here's the same table from our production PDF, clipped from PDF Expert, and at 100% view. The black on gradient text where the gradient is heaviest is what's affected the most, but we haven't seen the blurriness from your screen shot, Bill. What PDF reader are you using?
  14. Given the number of tables in Classic Fantasy, it's a big piece of work. It will be tackled and isn't forgotten.
  15. Extremely high praise for Mythic Babylon from Shukamu Press, which publishes the similarly themed 'Babylon On Which Fame and Jubilation Are Bestowed': You can read the full review here.
  16. If you’re familiar with the way the fantastic is portrayed in our other Mythic Earth titles, then this book follows in the same vein. Magic, creatures and gods of the period are real, but the history is also sound and well researched, meaning that the game can be run as a straight historical campaign, or one with magic, spirits and monsters.
  17. I accept zero responsibility. Point your lawyer in the directions of Messrs Gilmore and Mitchener, please. It's all their fault.
  18. If you buy the PDF from the TDM store, we can definitely work out a discount for you based on the PDF price, so not a problem. Just drop me a PM here with details.
  19. In the year 1765 BC, King Zimri-Lim of Mari emerged from a planning session with his aides and summoned his personal scribe. As he paced the courtyard in his palace in the city of Tuttul, he dictated a letter to the scribe, who used the cut end of a reed to press the message into a warm clay tablet. That letter, which was to be sent within the hour by speedy messenger, said:"To my wife, Šibtu, thus says Zimri-Lim: Ask the oracles in Mari questions about Hammurabi of Babylon. Will this man ever die? Does he speak with honesty? Will he bring war? Will he besiege my cities in Suhum while I campaign up north in Apum? Question the oracles, and when you have done so, do it again, and write to me with the answers."Some days later, the Queen of Mari replied:"I have asked the questions about Babylon; here is what I've learned. The Man of Babylon is sowing many seeds against this kingdom, but they will not bear fruit. Instead, you will overpower him and capture him. Then you'll see what the God will do to him. His days will soon be at an end. This you should know."Reassured, King Zimri-Lim organised his troops for departure to the district of Apum. He planned to give battle to the adventurer Atamrum, puppet of the Elamites, who was besieging his allies in the north.What is Mythic Babylon?Mythic Babylon is a role-playing supplement for the Mythras game system. It provides everything you need to take your Mythras game back to the 18th century BC and enter a world of cut-throat diplomacy, Machiavellian politics, and ecstatic prophets. Within these covers you'll find information on the society, culture, religion, trade, laws, and beliefs of Old Babylon and the surrounding lands. The setting is presented as a sand-box with a wide-ranging gazetteer of places to explore, each loaded with plot hooks. For those who like to play against the backdrop of history, we provide a timeline of past and near future events. A bestiary and a chapter for game masters rounds out the end of the book.This book contains everything you need to create adventures in the lands of Sumer, Akkad, and Subartu from the low lying Eden to the Cedar Mountains and even into the Underworld. Follow in the steps of kings like Gilgameš, Kubaba, or Hammurabi in this mythological and historical setting that was nearly 4000 years in the making.Where is Mythic Babylon?Mythic Babylon is set in what will later be called Mesopotamia by the Greeks, which means 'The Land Between the Rivers', referring to the Tigris and Euphrates. At the time our book is set, there is no one name for the whole region. Instead, the southern plain is called Sumer and the central plain is called Akkad. Together, these will one day be called Babylonia after the city of Babylon. The northern plain is called Subartu, but will one day come to be called Assyria after the city of Aššur.This book focuses on Sumer, Akkad, and Subartu. Peripheral regions such as ancient Syria, Turkey, Iran, and Bahrain are given a more cursory treatment.Expertly illustrated by James Turpin, Mythic Babylon is available in a variety of print on demand (POD) hardcover and softcover formats, plus a PDF version, from DrivethruRPG, Lulu, and the TDM Store. Aeon Games are preparing their own edition for the UK and Europe. The print version comes with the PDF free of charge, and an additional PDF package of maps at no extra charge.332 pages. From $17.99 (PDF) to $44.99 (hardcover).DrivethruRPG: https://www.drivethrurpg.com/product/355333/Mythic-BabylonLulu: Hardcover - https://www.lulu.com/en/ca/shop/pau...rdcover/product-4dz4v4.html?page=1&pageSize=4Lulu: Softcover - https://www.lulu.com/en/ca/shop/pau...perback/product-7z92qz.html?page=1&pageSize=4TDM Store - http://thedesignmechanism.com/store.php#!/Mythic-Babylon/p/367787033/category=24197109
  20. https://bundleofholding.com/presents/MythrasSettings A little over three days left on our incredible Mythras Settings Bundle of Holding. The Mythras core rules, Monsters Island, Combat Training modules, Lyonesse and Luther Arkwright. A whole bunch of fantastic PDFs are stunningly (and I do mean stunningly) great prices. I don't know when we'll have these games and supplements on sale at these rates again, so don't miss out. If you haven't experienced Mythras yet, there's no easier way than through this Bundle of Holding!
  21. There’s also the possibility that role playing games just aren't their thing. They may be sitting down at the table to please you or their mum, but really it's just not their cup of tea. It's worth asking them if they enjoy it and want to continue. If they don't, well that's fine - at least they gave it a shot.
  22. Mythras is once again the featured system over at Bundle of Holding, with some seriously spectacular deals on Mythras PDFs. This time around the Bundle consists of a Starter Collection (Mythras, Mythras Companion, Monster Island, Two Mythras Combat Training Modules) and the Bonus Collection - which contains Lyonesse (and two scenarios), Luther Arkwright, and the epic Arkwright campaign, Parallel Lines. The price just can't be beaten: just $7.95 for the Starter Collection, but if you pay a little more and meet (or beat) the Threshold Price, then the Bonus Collection is yours too. There is no better way to get into both Mythras and the amazing worlds of Jack Vance and Bryan Talbot than through this Bundle of Holding deal. And as Lyonesse is a self contained game, it represents astonishing value. The Mythras Bundle of holding runs until Monday 14th June, and 10% of all proceeds go towards Direct Relief, a charity that ensures protective equipment and critical care medications get to key health workers across the US and the rest of the world.
  23. Try it with fixed Action Points (either 2 or 3, it doesn't matter), but leave the intent of the Action Points as per RAW just to get used to the AP economy. As Rosen McStern rightly says, a one-attack-per-round model will lengthen the overall combat. Mythras combat isn't really about weapon damage and Hit Point attrition; it's about managing Action Points and generating Special Effects; these are the key to winning a fight. For example, Warrior A and Warrior B both have 2 Action Points. They are mortal enemies and one needs to kill the other. Warrior A goes first and hits. Warrior B tries to parry and misses. Both have used an Action Point. Warrior A inflicts only 3 points of damage which is absorbed by B's armour. But Warrior A also has a Special Effect; he chooses Trip and succeeds. Warrior B is flat on his back and Warrior A standing over him... Both have an AP left, but if you limit the number of attacks to just 1 per round, Warrior A really doesn't have many options. He can't act defensively as there's nothing to defend against. He doesn't need to use any skills as he has his opponent at a disadvantage. So at this point, it's stalemate. He can't do very much. He could opt to delay his action or do nothing, but Warrior B still has an Action Point he can use while prone, including Attack (because he hasn't attacked yet). Let's say Warrior A opts to delay to see what Warrior B does. B lashes out with a foot using Unarmed. He's at a penalty, but manages to land a lucky blow. Warrior A rolls to defend and fails. Warrior B now has a Special Effect and also chooses Trip. Both combatants are now on the ground. Warrior B also lands 3 points of damage to one of Warrior A's legs. The fight goes on into another round. Point is, if Warrior A had had the freedom to attack twice, he may well have finished off Warrior B in two quick and decisive moves - which is sometimes what you want. Instead, the one-attack-per-round rule severely limited his tactical options, resulting in a squandered advantage and a radical turning of the tables. So try the RAW first. How things read in the rules isn't necessarily how they translate in play, and it's worth trying the rules as presented because you may be pleasantly surprised.
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