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Philotomy

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  1. Ah, okay. You want consistency in the rolling; for example, if rolling low is good, then you'd like a lower roll to always be the better roll (if the degrees of success are equal). I get your objection, and I understand why it bothers you. I can't say that it bothers me, though. I find the "blackjack" approach to be easy to remember and apply, even if it is not as aesthetically nice as "rolling low is always better." (Actually, the discussion reminds me of similar objections to the way surprise rolls work in 1e AD&D -- it's usually good to roll high, unless your roll falls within the range where you're surprised, in which case it's better to roll low.) Anyway, I don't want to steer the thread away from discussing different approaches and into an argument about whether a different approach is needed; everybody has their own preferences. I was just curious about what your objections were.
  2. What is your criticism of the "blackjack" mechanism? (I know you've probably said that in the other thread, but it's a lot to dig through.)
  3. When you're prepping an adventure (for your own use, not for publication), how do you approach it? Do you write everything up like the (excellent) descriptions in something like Snake Pipe Hollow? Or do you just make a few notes? How complete are the stat blocks you use when you prep? What do you consider essential, and what is just extra work? Sandbox? Storyline/Plot? Or Just Situation? Do you tend to make maps, or use a flowchart, or just have events and wing the physical locations? Do you write up separate NPC lists (especially combat lists)? Et cetera. Just curious about how much variation there is in peoples' approaches.
  4. Just for completeness, here's how RQ3 handles it: The PC attempting knockback acts at his standard SR (as if using a fist attack). Compare the PC's STR+SIZ vs the SIZ+DEX of the target. Success indicates the target is knocked back as if the PC's STR+SIZ were weapon damage, minus the SIZ of the target, as for standard knockback. On a special success, the target's SIZ is *NOT* subtracted. On a critical success, the target loses any weapon he's holding (that isn't strapped on). On a failed intentional knockback attempt, the PC makes a DEXx5 roll or falls. If he *doesn't* fall, he (not his target) is knocked back as if the target's SIZ+STR were damage vs the PC's SIZ. If the failed attempt was a fumble, the PC suffers the penalties for a natural weapon fumble and the normal results of a failed knockback. If the target of a knockback is surprised by the intentional knockback attempt, the target does not use his DEX when resisting the knockback. If the knockback attempt comes at the end of straight-line movement towards the target, the attacker making the attempt adds 1 point to his STR+SIZ for every SR of movement before hitting the target. Other modifiers to the intentional knockback attempt are as per a standard attack. So instead of an attack roll, it's a resistance table check. At first I wasn't sure about this, but the more I think about it, the more I like it. It would be a very effective technique for big creatures (e.g. trolls, giants) -- especially if there are convenient immovable objects to knock their enemies into.
  5. Maybe we need some threads like "BRP in the Style of RQ3" and "BRP in the Style of Stormbringer/Elric" and "BRP in the Style of RQ2"?
  6. Yeah, I think I prefer the RQ3 rules for multiple attacks.
  7. Are the (optional) Strike Rank rules in the gold book the same as the RQ3 rules? I'm thinking maybe the gold book's strike rank multiple attacks rules are different. Is that correct? If so, where did the gold book's strike rank multiple attack rule come from?
  8. That's my guess, too. (I'm running into the same problem trying to save a new avatar, here.)
  9. Same here. Very annoying. How hard would it be for Chaosium to just provide a download link for the free adventure instead of a "purchase" through their screwed up online catalog system? Is it available anywhere else?
  10. I'm still not through reading Mythic Iceland, but I agree it's a great book and a great BRP rules implementation. One thing I really wish it had was an area map of the Snæfellsnes region (i.e., the default location for the "Trouble with Neighbors" adventure). Such a map might include some notable features like the troll cave, Skorri's farm, et cetera. One thing I'm uncertain about is how far apart farms in such an area might typically be.
  11. You're not kidding. When I saw this thread I thought, "Cool, now is a good time to pick up Mythic Iceland!" So I went to Chaosium's site, put it in my cart, and calculated the shipping. Even with the the sale and the cheapest shipping option for me, which is take-forever/no-tracking-number U.S. parcel post, the total price is higher than what it costs me to order the book from Amazon with 2-day shipping included (I have that "Amazon Prime" thing). So I ordered it from Amazon for cheaper and should have it on Wednesday.
  12. I agree with pretty much everything in your post, including this bit. I doubt Chaosium will burn their bridges with old players, and I don't think any changes from "classic CoC" to "CoC 7" will be as drastic as say, TSR D&D vs. 4e D&D. Nevertheless, I don't think the kinds of changes being proposed are a good idea, and I'm frankly skeptical of arguments along the lines of "don't worry -- these changes are not a big deal and don't change the way the game plays/feels."
  13. "This I pledge to you: while there will be room for refinement, zthee game will remain zthee same... "
  14. Well, it's not totally a bad scan job. The text isn't scanned; it was re-typed and re-set. They didn't have the original art, so artwork is scanned and touched-up. Overall, I think they did about as good a job as one could expect. Better than I expected, actually. My advice is to take a look the actual books and then decide if you want them or not.
  15. If they're going to make significant changes/additions/etc to Call of Cthulhu, I'd like it better if they called it something else: Tales of Cthulhu, Calamari Rising, Cthulhu Next -- anything but Call of Cthulhu.
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