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Sir_Godspeed

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Sir_Godspeed last won the day on September 27

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  • RPG Biography
    Some DnD, mostly video games otherwise.
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    None atm.
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    Norway
  • Blurb
    Very much a beginner. Mostly interested in the story- and lore aspect over crunch.

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  1. One might adopt an entire bloodline, of course, but in the case of individual adoption, it probably involves establishing new family bonds. Perhaps your sponsors become your new, adopted parents, for example. Or perhaps the Chief takes the job. This is important because in a culture that often lacks abstracted laws, concrete family ties helps everyone understand how to relate to you, and what your obligations and privileges are. The exact degree to which it is done mostly as a formality or more personal is probably on a case by case basis, but you're probably going to have to prepare to treat your new parents with due filial respect, at least. EDIT: I'm going by the experiences of a few fellow anthropology students. A couple went to Melanesia, where they were adopted into families, as this helped everyone know how to relate to them. This was not a painless process, at least one of them had a very mixed experience of the complex and demanding social tasks this involved, including babysitting her "nieces" and "nephews", and behaving submissively to her "father". Now, I'm not claiming Orlanthi are similar to RW Melanesians, but it's as good an angle as any to look at it from.
  2. Zzabur is finally tired of these lesser simulacrums of true people running around using scraps from his writings to cause a ruckus. He decides to delete the Word Processor from the operating system.
  3. Sorry to hear you're in pain, best wishes for things to get better. 😞
  4. Eyh man, this thread is about people's preferences, let's not knock each others'.
  5. Not sure how "canon" it is anymore, or ever was, but I definitely ignore the idea that the symbol of the EWF was, in-universe, literally the three Latin letters "E. W. F." fused together.
  6. Speaking of Britain, has anyone here seen The Green Knight? I haven't seen it yet, but trailers really gave off this magical realism vibe and some of the imagery certain seemed to fit a Heroquest-y vibe. Though obviously, given the literal Arthurian story, maybe people will poo-poo this comparison and point to the more obvious similarity to Pendragon instead.
  7. You could plausibly put pretty much anyone from anywhere in Nochet as well, for anyone so inclined.
  8. "I wouldn't mind having you in my head if you weren't so obviously insane."
  9. It's a gendered archetype, definitely, one that's pretty widespread IRL as well. One thing that's worth digging into is distinguishing active vs. passive vis-a-vis violent vs. non-violent. Specifically, that we do not immediately qualify every event where someone performs a non-violent action as passive simply because they do not beat someone up. Chalana Array and Lhankor Mhy joining the Lightbringer Quest comes to mind, for example. Neither are archeypically violent (CA moreso, obviously). Both definitely very involved and proactive, though. I know there are examples of goddesses performing actions ("participating in things") in their own capacity and not primarily through or along with someone else (which, in fairness, happens a lot with Ernalda, because that's sorta her thing), such as Babeester or Maran Gor, Kyger Litor and obviously the Red Goddess or perhaps even Oslira to some degree, but listing these piecemeal might only serve to obscure rather than dispel the general trend of goddesses being less overtly proactive or involved than male gods. I know this is something that's been discussed before, and it's also been brought up in relation to how RPGs often are kinda railroaded into simulating violence specifically rather than a wider range of human actions, possibly in this very thread. It's often easier for us as readers/gamers to recognize violent acts as innately active or noteworthy than other actions, even if that's not necessarily the case in Glorantha's canon, even. A bit rambly, I admit, but I guess what I mean overall is: - There ARE examples of goddesses doing shit by and for themselves, but I think they are on average less likely to be explicitly violent acts and often therefore less easy to pinpoint and mentally make note of. - However, even with this isse of "apologetics", the criticism of goddesses more often having a supporting or "passive" role ("reactive" might be more accurate) stands true and this is something that can be rectified. - The theme of femininity in Glorantha strikes me as often one of social relations, which kinda makes less room for the kind of wild journeys and quests that the typical "heroic adventure" stories of gods and mortals are made of, but I admit this might be a bias of my reading. I know there are sample characters and many campaign characters who are women off doing stuff of their own accord, and there is likely some of that among the gods as well. Still, the themes of most of the feminine myths I can recall tend to be about establishing social relations (it's present in male god myths as well, because myths are often explanations for social customs or the like, but I'd argue it's less diagnostic for them.) Dunno if this is a valuable contribution. It'd probably be more worthwhile for more women to speak together on what they take away from what's written.
  10. Revealed Mythologies, where most of my East Isles mythology knowledge comes from at least, is a product of an earlier era of Glorantha development, from what I understand. The strict division is one thing, although I'm sure there are other aspects as well. This is all to say that if we ever get a new source for it, I expect it to look quite different. That being said, East Isles myth, as it stands, divides the world into gods and antigods, an arrangement that is fairly unique, and it lacks a proper Darkness, once again fairly unusual. Additionally beings like Vith and probably others are only (imho) partial fits for their closest Monomyth equivalents. Anyway, I don't want to derail the thread, my point was just to try and add some examples of feminine Fire/Sky.
  11. Vith's wife Laraloori appears to be associated with the (day?) sky. She's also the mother of at least two directly fire-related deities, one of crafting and one more of fire generally, I think, so her fiery-ness seems at least contextually likely. That being said, the sun itself seems to be associated with Vith or Govmeranen, I think? Both of which are male. There are others here that have dipped deeper into the Parlothi than me. East Isles mythology is not only poorly integrated into the God Learner monomyth, making its figures, myths and overall concepts harder to directly pair with the the former, but they're also, out-of-universe-wise, probably not quite "updated" to the current vision of Glorantha, aside from the few things we get in the Guide.
  12. I think the general (God Learnery) angle is that Dendara is to Ernalda as Oria is to Esrola. Ie. one goddess associated with the more spiritual/intellectual aspects of Earth while the other is associated with the more material ones. This is obviously a generalization, but it mostly works.
  13. They could easily be using "just vibing" as well.
  14. I posit that Andrew WK is some kind of god of partying. There's even a group dedicated to unravelling a supposed conspiracy behind him, which means there's a whole mystery cult aspect. How very Arkati!
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