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Coronoides

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About Coronoides

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  • RPG Biography
    Hobbyist RPG designer since 1983. Author of Gulliver's Trading Company. Author of "The Tinkers Toolkit, Race Design" a mathematical analysis of D&D 5e canon races as an aid to race design on the DMs Guild. Fan of Ringworld and Magic World. Contributor RPG Review fanzine.
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    BRP wise fiddling around with creating a new setting for Magic World.
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    Research scientist by day, game designer by night.

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  1. My assumption was 'no'. Simply because how (as per your example) it greatly inflates the Sorcerer's resistance chances.
  2. I’m travelling and only have my Mythras PDF so I can’t check my library. For iterations of BRP that use hit locations, can anyone remind me how to calculate hit points by location for creature with non-humanoid hit locations? Can’t see an explanation in my Mythras. 3 uses. Above or below average NPCs non-humanoid PCs creating new creatures Thanks.
  3. Also several spells in the Advanced Sorcery chapter of Advanced Sorcery are tied to Allegience.
  4. Hi and welcome. What settings have you brought to life with MW? I’m fairly new to Magic World myself but when I’m learning a new game I do so by writing a setting that plays to the game’s strengths. For Magic World I made The Broken Isles. To make good use of the rules presented in Magic World this setting is an Iron Age archipelago where bloody conflict between the various nations and species of peoples is all too common; often due to the hidden influences of the gods of Light, Balance, and Shadow. Here wizards are rare but feared and drawn blades all too common. The Broken Isles are a long archipelago stretching from the equator to the arctic and nearly as wide. The only other land mass is the continent of the elves separated from the Broken Isles by a vast ocean. Survival and ambition are the two underlying themes of this setting. Magic World provides rules covering the unpleasant aspects of Iron Age life: disease, poison, seasickness, drowning, and fights that can leave you horribly wounded if not dead. However, overcoming these risks makes achieving your goals even sweater. Ambition and grit can make a soldier an Emperor and allow a wizard to uncover powerful arcane knowledge, or they can die horribly trying. Your PCs will find themselves in a world increasingly concerned with the ambitions of one man, the Emperor who is trying to bring the world under the laws and faith of homeland. The effects of this one man’s crusade are felt even in nations distant from the battlefronts as refugee’s and slaves arrive, trade is disrupted, and emissaries of the Empire influence local rulers. Once the peoples of the world lived on their own islands. Today the citizens of cosmopolitan ports and cities include dwarves, elves, giants, gnomes, goblins, humans, and trolls mingling amongst each other without much remark. Humans in particular are now so common the elves call them a plague. However, there are rare peoples who would draw the stares or blades of even the most jaded dock dweller. Most people will only ever see one or two dragons, centaurs, or talking beasts in their life and there and peoples who most only know about from old legends. All of these peoples have numerous and varied cultures further adding to the bewilderment of travellers. What have you ported from other d100 games into your MW? Other than stealing the stats for house cats from Cthulhu Dreamlands nothing. I haven’t needed to yet. Magic World is fairly complete as is. I know a lot of people port in other magic systems but I actually prefer the Magic World core book’s simple and unified system. I would like to include cleric type spells, what could I port over to do this? Well advanced sorcery has a chapter of extra spells for the core magic world sorcery rules many of which have allegiance requirements or effects. I wouldn’t add in other magic systems as others have suggested. Why? Firstly, the additions would detract from the streamlined play and easy to learn nature of Magic World. Do that and you just get closer to playing RuneQuest and miss out on Magic World’s unique niche. Second, Sorcery is based on intellect and learning. In most Iron Age societies most scholars were also priests. In a fantasy world Sorcery would be another branch of knowledge that priests study. How are shields used in MW? I think this has been answered.
  5. A few more slight tweaks. Seafaring Crossing an open ocean like the Pacific or Atlantic is tricky business without a way to measure longitude and with the western Iron Age/medieval ships provided in Magic World. The rules as printed are fine for island hopping and coast hugging but if you want to emulate Columbus or Leif Erikson then some house rules are needed. Firstly, based on historical examples a seaworthiness of at least 22 is recommended and even then if the weather turns bad there is a good chance you will sink. It is a good idea to avoid storm season. Really big warships are not recommended because they lose seaworthiness to fast and can't carry enough supplies to feed and water their large crews for the duration of the crossing. Secondly, recruit the best navigator you can, a good navigator not only prevents you from going off coarse but can also help avoid the worst weather and make use of currents and prevailing winds. Houserule: Ocean Crossings While within a day’s sail of the sight of land the usual navigation rules from the core book apply (MW135). When in the open ocean multiple Navigation rolls are needed and Luck plays a part as described below. When considering an ocean crossing the first question is do you have a detailed and accurate chart of a known route that makes use of ocean currents and prevailing winds? In some settings charts are freely available or at least a collection of them is included in a navigator’s starting equipment as ‘trade tools’. In other settings charts might be rare and hoarded secrets as difficult to acquire as grimoires of spells and just as valuable. Another possibility is that an accurate chart to your destination simply does not exist. Each chart is one way, a return journey would use different currents and winds. That said charts are often found in pairs describing a return journey. Navigating with a chart If you have a chart then you need only roll Navigation and the Navigator’s Luck for the first week away from land, for any week immediately after a Whole Gale or Hurricane (MW135), and the last week before you expectto see land. Navigating without a chart Navigation and Luck rolls at sea are made once per week (or part thereof) when out of sight of land. Making the rolls The Chronicler makes all rolls secretly and tracks the ships actual position. Out of sight of land longitude can only be figured by error-prone dead-reckoning, is out of sight of land for three or more days so reduce navigation skill by 20 points. If out of sight of land and threeor more days in the week have complete cloud cover then reduce navigation skill by a further 20 points. Remember at sea effective navigation skill is never higher than the navigator’s sailing skill (MW42). At the end of the week compare the results of the Luck and navigation rolls to the table below: Navigation result Fumble Fail Success Special Critical Luck result Fumble 70% 45% 20% 0% 0% Fail 60% 35% 10% 0% Fair Weather Success 50% 25% 0% Fair Weather Fair weather, No encounter Special 40% 15% Fair Weather Fair weather, No encounter Fair Weather, no encounter, +10% speed Critical 30% 5% Fair weather No encounter Fair Weather, no encounter, +10% speed Fair weather, fortunate encounter, +10% speed. Interpreting the table. %: Figure the distance the ship has travelled that weekand multiply by the %. This is how far off coarse the ship is. To determine the direction off-coarse roll a d6: 1 West, 2 East, 3-4 North, 5-6 South. Fair Weather: next week the ship will find itself in Light Winds (MW133-135). No Encounter: the ship does not encounter any random encounters in the next week. +10% Speed: the ship has made good time add 10% to the distance covered that week. Fortunate Encounter: the ship experiences some good fortune. The Chronicler can invent an event or encounter. Examples include a downpour when the ship is low on fresh water, dolphins ride the bow wave increase the Luck of all aboard by 10% next week, when food is low a dense school of biting herring surround the ship, or they encounter another ship that is somehow helpful. Making a chart. Anyone with an eye for detail can copy an existing chart with a Scribe roll. To create a new chart first you have to make the journey and keep a log in a blank book (MW35). After you have reached your destination the Chronicler makes a Scribe roll for you to create your chart. Remember each chart is one way from a particular departure point to one destination. If the roll is a fail you are told your logs are insufficient to make a good chart. If the roll is a fumble you are told you are successful but anyone using the chart will arrive 100 miles from the destination. On a critical success add +10% to the Navigation roll of anyone using the chart. Navigator Occupation You are a necessary crew member of any ship able to navigate to all the trading ports. Your travels have shown you the known world and plenty of adventure but you long for more. Now you seek to find a voyage of exploration. When you discover new lands your name will be remembered forever. Skills: Sailing, Swim, Navigate, Nature, World Lore, Scribe, one other skill as a personal speciality, and one weapon skill.
  6. Note also, because of the BRP base articles written for MW would be of some use to players of other BRP games. Is there an umbrella fanzine for all BRP games? If so material could be sent there. This would get stuff out there but also increase MW's exposure to a receptive group. Just thinking.
  7. I’m sure to generate some material
  8. A permanent decduction of Alliegience to power spells could work. The dieties hate to be bothered.
  9. Looking at my table Darth Vader is a Champion of Light!
  10. Another peak behind the curtain... Reputation: this is a new skill used to determine if others have heard of you. Since magic use is rare and important in this world, base reputation is (number of spell levels known)%. Reputation is a Communication category skill. Unlike other skills other people roll on your skill to see if they have heard of you. A special success will also have heard of the character’s most notable deed, their flashiest spell, and recognise them from description. A critical success will recognise them, be able to list the caster’s three most flashiest spells, and be able to list the several of their noteworthy deeds. In places you have never been these levels of success are reduced one step or two if there is no shared language. A critical failure mistakes the character for someone else entirely. Reputation is checked for experience only after completing a notable deed that had witnesses or recognition. Adventurers thanked by the count with a feast after slaying a dragon would qualify. Note: I have just changed the Base % from 0 to number of spells known. Spell casters posted prior to this should add spell levels know to reputation. In my world spell casting is a rare and important skill. Spellcasting education is available at about the same rate as literacy in Europe's middle ages (about 1% of the population). Only about 1% of those with POW16+ know how to cast spells. PCs with POW16+ are assumed to be among those lucky few.
  11. Culture I allow the Priest/Shaman occupation for State cultures. I suspect its absence is a hold-over from Glorantha. Is that true? All the historical Iron Age to Medieval states I can think of had strong religions and therefore priests. Languages are not discussed much. All the cultures in a setting could have their own languages if you wanted but then you better ensure all PCs have at least one language in common! How have you handled languages in your setting? There are four broad categories of culture in the book (MW18) and I created a new option ‘Solitaire’ (see below). A setting might define specific cultures with their own languages within these broad categories. Has anyone done this? What categories would you put well known fictional and historical cultures into? Solitaire ‘Culture’ Some fantasy species live as solitary individuals. This ‘culture’ represents a lackof culture. Any parental education is minimal. These individuals are educated mostly by the experience of surviving alone, and thus lack sophisticated knowledge except of the wilds they are familiar with. We do assume that before play they have had enough contact with others to pick up a language, or know it instinctively as dragons do in some worlds. By necessity a solitaire PC is self-reliant in the extreme. Examples: Abandoned in the forest as a child and perhaps raised by wolves or other beasts. Those who have gone mad, utterly forgetting civilised ways and living like a beast. Wild talking beasts especially solitary predators like crocodiles, eagles, and panthers. In many worlds dragons, fachans, and other solitary monstrous predators. Skills: Climb, Hide, Move Quietly, Nature, Sense, Swim, Track. Occupations: Fisher, Hunter, Lost/Forgotten, Nomad. What do you think? Culture and Race Note that while many cultures are dominated by a species, culture and species need not be synonymous as they are in Tolkiens works and much modern fantasy. A setting could allow any species to can come from any culture. If you want to play a dragon living among elves you could in such a world. If this is true then species still determines your base skill %. This could be for several reasons. The physical and mental differences between species affect base skills. Additionally, species cannot interbreed and so families and communities of a species tend to pass some culture down through the generations preserving traditions that emerged on the origin land of the species millennia ago before the great diasporas. How do you handle species and culture?
  12. Sir Gorland is the closest I could get to the mounted and armoured knight archetype. He has mail and a shield but there is no way a starting character can afford a warhorse. Sir Gorland is a skilled fighter and a competent leader. MagicWorldCS Knight.pdf
  13. Today’s offering is a young dragon 10’ long from nose to tail tip. Since I use 83pt for Characteristics with points allocated within the rollable range this opens up weaker and some potent species in a fair way. With only 83pt this dragon is by nessesity a young dragon. I created a solitaire culture to cover solitary predators like dragons. Solitaire ‘Culture’ Some fantasy species live as solitary individuals. This ‘culture’ represents a lack of culture. Any parental education is minimal. These individuals are educated mostly by the experience of surviving alone, and thus lack sophisticated knowledge except of the wilds they are familiar with. We do assume that before play they have had enough contact with others to pick up a language, or know it instinctively as dragons do in some worlds. By necessity a solitaire PC is self-reliant in the extreme. Examples: Abandoned in the forest as a child and perhaps raised by wolves or other beasts. Those who have gone mad, utterly forgetting civilised ways and living like a beast. Wild talking beasts especially solitary predators like crocodiles, eagles, and panthers. In many worlds dragons, fachans, and other solitary monstrous predators. Skills: Climb, Hide, Move Quietly, Nature, Sense, Swim, Track. Occupations: Fisher, Hunter, Lost/Forgotten, Nomad. Finally, here are my notes for dragons in my setting: Dragons All the dragons of the Broken Isles are intelligent creatures, none have fixed INT. Dragons are another creation of the gods of Shadow for the wars than raged in the first age of the world. Dragons epitomise individual power, self-sufficiency, and ambition. Most become selfish greedy vain creatures with no regard for others. However they are free-willed creatures and some embrace the kinder traits of Shadow who champion freedom and creativity. A few are even swayed into the influence of Balance or Light. Therefore though rarely seen dragons have a mixed reputation. A dragon approaching a city will be greeted by soldiers and questions but not attacked outright. After all, an enraged dragon could burn half your city but a dragon ally is invaluable. Most dragons live as Solitaires (see this document for this culture). Dragon (with 2d6+6 INT and 3d6 APP) Total of minimum possible rolls for Characteristics 20+10+20+8+10+3+3=74, under 83 so playable but you will be rather young and puny by dragon standards. However, during play you can increase your characteristics in the usual ways up to the maximums allowed for dragons. Unlike the description in the book dragons of this world require POW 16 or higher to cast spells. A dragon’s tail sweep is an area attack but the book does not give the area. I assume the tail hits targets within a right triangle shaped area with sides of SIZ/10 metres/yards round down. Skills: Listen 50% (+35), Search 25% (+5), Ride 00%(-35), Sailing 00%(-15), Physik 15% (-15), Craft 00% (-05), picklock 00% (-5), repair/devise 00% (44%), trap 01 (-4). Total +0. Weapons skills: Breath 60%, Claw 25%, Bite 25%, Tail 50%. Remember a PC dragon does not get the species’ extra attack. Dragons in this setting are excellent swimmers and often get much of their food from the sea. Add swim speed 8. Dragons are have long tails and necks. To find a dragon’s length multiply the height given for a humanoid of the same SIZ by x1.5; for wingspan double the height given for humanoids. magicworldcs dragon.pdf
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