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kenco

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About kenco

  • Rank
    Newbie

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  • RPG Biography
    Played various RPGs since the early '80s
  • Current games
    Running 3 home-brew fantasy/ sc-fi campaigns. Playing Dragon Warriors, OD&D.
  • Blurb
    Likes board games, too.

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  1. Thanks for getting back to me. That's very helpful, especially in relation to A & C. In relation to case b) it seems like the other guy can stop my character moving off the spot by attacking, unless my character passes a dodge test. So this is not a case of 'turn and bolt, regardless of the consequences', which is the one I had in mind. Or is the idea in the above that if the opponent attacks and the dodge fails, the opponent has chased after the fleeing character, stabbed her in the back and are still hot on her heels? I feel like I'm missing some key principle here about ho
  2. Hey, thanks for answering - I appreciate your putting in the time. My PDF says "Fourth Printing September 2017", and the full text of that section is exactly as you have given it. My quote might be confusing because I only included the final sentence (which is exactly the same as yours), not the whole section. So unfortunately, this doesn't really answer my question. At Movement Combat Actions on p72, the section on Retreat says: Retreat: A character decides to escape the combat. See “Disengaging from Combat” on page 64 I.e. It looks like a circular reference to m
  3. I am having a closer look at my PDF of OpenQuest Basic, and I am having trouble understanding how to apply 'Disengaging from combat'. Specifically I am looking at the Opposed case described on page 64 as follows: If the character is attempting to Fight their way out of combat, use the Retreat Movement Action (See Movement Actions below), where the character fights one more round of combat and if successful escapes the combat. How is this normally interpreted/ applied? My doubt centres on the phrase 'fights one more round of combat'. Three specific questions: 1) When does th
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