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  1. My new RuneQuest adventure is up on the Jonstown compendium! Help some newtlings fight off a horrible threat and join a water cult! Get it here! And to celebrate the release of Bog Struggles, my previous RuneQuest adventure, A Short Detour (which I just realized is now Silver best seller, thank you very much) is on sale at almost 30% off! Get it here! Thanks a lot to my usual partner in crime, @Crel.
  2. A personal note before I begin this week's post. Last week's hiatus could not have been more timely. I ended up going through a week from hell. I am not entirely convinced it isn't going to turn out to be a fortnight from Hell, but at least the crises I faced this last week have been resolved. Can't speak for tomorrow's crises, but then again tomorrow doesn't exist yet. Ruination What do you think of, when you think of ruins? There are many types of ruins, but they all have the same ending: places which are no longer being used, for whatever reason. A ruin might have been abandoned due to economic reasons, or due to the death of the person who kept the community together. A place can be brought to ruin by enemy conquest, or by natural disaster. However it happened, a ruin is a place where dreams died, and the past can only serve as a warning to the present. Types of Ruin Here are some ideas as to what sort of ruin the Adventurers can find themselves in. Roll on 1d20 or choose. Age of Ruins Next, look at the age of the ruins. Roll 1d10 or choose. Claim To Fame Some ruins have a claim to fame; a place in the history books. Think of the ruins of Troy and Pompeii, of Sutton Hoo and Derinkuyu. Imagine the Great Library of Alexandria at its height and its nickname, "The Place of The Cure of The Soul." Imagine the now-vanished workshop od Tapputi, the world's first recorded scientist, chemist, perfumer, and the inventor of the distillery. Or your world's oldest amphitheatre, where the most famous historical playwright of your fantasy world once trod the sand and delivered her impassioned monologues, and entertained the crowds with philosophically-charged plays and parables? An abandoned hospital, thousands of years old, on the site of your world's first university, will be charged with a different kind of energy than the wreckage of a deserted psychiatric hospital abandoned due to an outbreak of plague ten years ago. How / Why Did The Ruin Form? Most ruins form from either economically-motivated abandonment, warfare, a natural disaster, disease, famine, conquest, invasion, ideological imposition, or the cessation of some form of resource on which the ruins depended. Economically-motivated abandonment: That's simply money. People stopped coming to the place, perhaps because the location was no longer central to the city and a new place had opened up in the centre of a new, expanded community. Consider a temple sited on a hill. The supporting city builds a new temple in the centre, and people stop coming to the old temple, eventually trigge3ring its abandonment as the priesthood move to the new temple. Warfare: The city of Troy was thought of as a Greek myth, until it was discovered (and then blown to smithereens by explosives. Go figure). Also, the capital of Ancient Corinth deserves a mention here. Corinth is the place where the Corinthians lived, accorsing to the Biblical Letters of Saint Paul. They were also mentioned in the Acts of The Apostles in the same bible. You can thank the Romans for destroying the place, and the sea for claiming the rest of it. Natural disaster: Consider Pompeii, smothered for more than a millennium by Vesuvius. Your ruins could be buried in several hundred feet of volcanic ashes, washed away by a tsunami, or even (in your fantasy world) partly obliterated by a falling rock. A very small falling rock, which made a big mess, like Chelyabinsk in 2013. Disease: A horrific way to go, diseases such as the plague, smallpox and so on can ravage entire regions of the countrydside. In the Harnworld setting, The Red Death (smallpox) claimed millions across Northwestern Lythia, including the island of Harn. The nation of Thonia (which has its own geographic module, published by Kelestia Publications) was all but rendered a barren wasteland. Thonia's thriving, yet isolated, civilisations were all but eradicated by the Red Death. Famine: Famine can also lay waste entire regions. Famine can be caused by a number of factors: war, disease, drought, natural disaster - but also stupidity. Cultivation requires effort, planning, and resources: a crop which fails can turn a paradise island into a Summerisle. Conquest / Invasion: Going back to the ancient city of Troy, and to Alexandria. In both cases, imagine what they would have looked like today, if they had not been scrubbed down to the foundations by some ugly brute invaders. The same goes for ideological imposition: look at all those Abbeys and Monasteries which were ordered shut down by Henry VIII. Cessation: Not exactly famine, as such, or even economic abandonment. Sometimes, a natural resource which drew people to a civic centre just dries up. Water from a natural spring (perhaps blessed by the Gods), or a herb which becomes extinct, or even some technology on which the rest of the region depends, but which becomes obsolete with the advent of a new technology (such as iron in the Bronze Age, or the mouldboard plough, or irrigation). Why Explore These Ruins? What would bring the Adventurers to an abandoned site? As Gamesmaster, you could think of a few reasons, but here are half a dozen ideas to set you off. Rescue: Someone has gone wandering away from the community, off into the wilderness, and they've become stuck somehow amid the ruins on the hill. Perhaps they fell through a sinkhole to an undiscovered complex beneath; or perhaps they might have fallen foul of some bandits who have taken refuge there. Either way, time is of the essence before the missing person is killed or dies of exposure. Reclamation: The ruins have now been bought up by a landowner, who wishes to develop the property. The Adventurers can be tasked with going there to clear out the monsters which have taken residence there, and which occasionally have been making forays into the town during times of famine. They could also venture there in order to find out some reason why they should not build there - perhaps it is credibly haunted, or there is still a trace of lingering plague there, and so on. Shelter: - The Adventurers are passing by, when a storm hits, or snow, or they spot an oncoming invasion, and the ruins provide shelter and concealment. Exploration: - There are rumours of a lost treasure of some kind hidden in the ruins. Don't knock this one: you never know when your clumsy excavations in the floor of an ancient Abbey may reveal a hidden copy of The Qur'an from the 13th Century. Diplomacy: - Circumstances might require a neutral meeting point for meetings intended to bring a war to an end, or to conduct some state of affairs between cultures or nations. What better place than a ruin which nobody can lay claim to, or even a ruin which has cultural significance to both parties (e.g. a ruined Abbey where a treaty had been signed between two warring nations six hundred years before, the first time both nations had gone to war with one another). Trade: - Your Adventurers have someone or something. The other side has someone or something. What better place to arrange the exchange than a place which has excellent sight lines for one or both teams' snipers? Or maybe they could go there with a genuine intent to swap ... Last Word In the end, a ruin can be more than just a place to store random monsters to chop into little pieces. If you think that the abandoned places of the world can be more interesting to explore without bands of wandering monsters, feel free to use the above guidelines to work out some adventures to throw at your Adventurers. Who knows; they could uncover a Derinkuyu in some unexplored part of the world, and build up a population in the tens of thousands livin underground, with themselves as the leaders of an entire community and the complex as their base of operations - or they could content themselves with building an underground home, and building a regional power base with trade coming to them. Just watch out for those ancient ghosts ...
  3. My first RuneQuest adventure is live on the Jonstown Compendium! Grab it now it still has plenty of typos! When the adventurers stumble upon a mother and her son being attacked by wild boars, they are thrown into a tricky situation in which multiple powerful factions are on a collision course. What will your players do when they can decide who lives and who dies? A Short Detour is a straightforward adventure for RuneQuest Glorantha that will take about one big or two short sessions of play. It can be placed anywhere around Sartar, with the text assuming that your campaign is based in or near Colymar lands. In addition to the adventure, A Short Detour provides an insightful look at the nature of Chaos, with rules for Chaotic corruption. A copy of the Glorantha Bestiary and Red Book of Magic are recommended to run this adventure, but not totally necessary. Buy it now! Thanks!
  4. September's MOTM—from Diana Probst of Beer With Teeth infamy—is now available on the JC! Years ago, a Lunar Hero and a Wind Lord of Orlanth fought a terrific battle which led to their mutual demise. Buried together in a single grave, the mingled remains wove their souls together. Now this tormented ghost haunts the dreaded Valley of the Blight, in the lands of the Cinsina Tribe. In this issue's "mini-adventure," your adventurers will get to: Fight or heal the wounded souls of two Heroes Discover the secrets of their fatal duel Strive to restore the Valley's Fertility—returning its spirits to Ernalda's bosom! This short adventure is intended to provide one gamemaster, and four to six adventurers, with an evening of play. About this Series: Monster of the Month is a series of new bestiary entries for Chaosium's RuneQuest: Roleplaying in Glorantha. In addition to statblocks and behavior, most entries will include supplemental detail and advice for gamemasters and/or new adventurer options for players.
  5. The Adventurers are the core of all games. As games have developed, adventure modules have been less about pre-packaged mazes full of hazards and more about dramas and conflicts, with the Adventurers at the heart of driving the changes. As adventures have developed from their implausible "mazes full of traps and horrors" to more nuanced scenarios and dramas, so too have Adventurers. Modern Adventuring parties now more closely resemble bands of roaming mercenaries, military units or hunting parties - even posses, rounded up by the local law to track down and apprehend fugitives. Adventuring parties show structure and purpose, and there is a definite lifestyle pattern to Adventuring. Forming, Storming, Norming, and Performing Every party begins life during Session Zero, where the Games Master allows the players to introduce their characters. This generally just consists of the player introducing themselves, their character, and something about who their player is (what species they are, where they come from, what they are most famous for). In certain older games, it's all "name, species, class" and everybody would know what the character can do; but, this being Mythras, things are not nearly so clear-cut. The player may use their background, or their career, or their culture, to explain why they are Adventurers, or add a detail out of whole cloth. It might be a good idea for Games Masters to note down any player additions to their GM character notes. Games Masters, it's a really good idea to get a copy of the player characters' sheets, so you can tell at a glance what each is good at and where they are weakest. Players, work with your GM on this. It makes things so much easier when both you and the GM are aware of your character's 90% Track skill and grasp of the Pathway Folk Magic cantrip, for instance, especially if the other players forget these details about them. An example - in the adventure "A Race Through Dark Places" which I ran during GenCon 2021, each pregenerated character had one thing in common - some sort of connection to the spirit realm. Only one of the characters was an actual animist; the others had some sort of exceptional ability or experience which connected them to the spirit, and which allowed them to interact with spirits in some way. This was, of course, important to the scenario, which required characters who were capable of defending themselves against spectral assaults. Another adventure might have the characters united by a common theme - they are all theatre entertainers who lost their job, or they are all competitive fighters who are out training, or they are a patrol of guards securing the condato of a city (the country beyond the city walls which grows the crops the city needs to keep its population fed). The real point of Session Zero, beyond introducing the characters to the other players, is to allow the players to let the character bond with one another. They will be working as a team, soon enough. First Time Out There are many ways to start an adventure going. The Adventurers could be drawn into an ongoing story, unfolding before their eyes; or they could be brought together by a friendly Connection ("I'm puttin' together a team"). The party leader could well seek to form a team of people, based on their already-existing renown (The Seven Samurai, The Magnificent Seven, The Dirty Dozen, Hawk The Slayer, Krull, Battle Beyond The Stars, The ABC Warriors) and lead that team in person, rather than send them out on a mission. However the team forms, they must spend their first few days together. This is the time where the players get to form the team's dynamic. Which characters are early birds; which ones are night owls; and how effective the party leader's Oratory skills are. It is okay for the players to have trouble integrating the team at this point. Every team of veterans began as raw recruits, and there is no such thing as Adventurer Boot Camp in most fantasy milieux (unless a member of the party comes up with the idea as a long-term ambition, but that's for a later blog). Every new team has to start learning to fit in, to work well within the group, and to complement everybody else, filling in the weaknesses in other characters' skills while hoping other team members will support their weaknesses, and so on. An example is a party whose first adventure takes them deep into the wilderness, for example looking for the driver of a trading wagon who disappeared during the night. Characters need to have access to a variety of wilderness skills to make sense of the adventure - but while every character may have access to Athletics, Boating, Locale, Ride, and Swim, not everyone has access to Navigation, Seamanship, Survival, and Track. It is reasonable, however, to have at least two characters show a mix of at least two relevant skills (Navigation and Survival or Boating, Seamanship and Swim, Locale and Survival) in order to ensure that the party has access to all of the relevant skills between them. This allows each character a chance to shine - the Survival expert to build shelters, the Track expert using Navigation to determine where the prey is going, and so on. The players should work out for themselves how to allocate the best tasks to the best players - such as getting the Folk Magician with knowledge of Ignite to help start the fire built by the Survival expert, and getting all the party members to help one another out with pitching tents, foraging, finding clean water, preparing the food, establishing a camp perimeter, and so on. The concept of standard kit should be brought up before play ever begins. Every character must have access to a minimum amount of kit to help them to survive. This will be covered in the next blog post. Games Masters: What To Do Give the characters tasks suited to their needs. Let the party leader know what needs to be done, and allow the leader to negotiate with the players as to what tasks they ought to do. This is the best time to iron out any conflicts and complaints about leadership style, and allows the leader to get a feel as to how the team can work together. Remember, this is the first time for these Adventurers. They will have been torn from their cosy lives by the call to adventure, and they are bound to make mistakes. Games Masters: What Not To Do Their mistakes should not, however, cost the players their lives, or even injure them. Humiliate them, sure. The Survival expert might put together a perfect campfire, but the wood might be green and non-inflammable without the team magician's Ignite spell; the Navigation expert might get turned around and be unable to find his way back to the camp until somebody finally gets the campfire lit, and so on. Never put the starting party in jeopardy of any great or permanent injury. And never have them face a combat encounter on their first ever trek out - not unless the combat was the point, such as teaming up to fight brigands camping out in the woods, or kobolds driven down from the mountains to raid a village, and so on. And even so, never soften them up with a lethal combat encounter, first thing. Even an adventure involving tracking down and punishing miscreants should end with the battle, not have the battle take place in the middle somewhere. No, it is a stupid idea to have them face a random giant, passing dragon, or lich on their first night under the stars. You know they couldn't cope. They know they couldn't cope. Handing the party a TPK (Total Party Kill) in their first session is a guarantee that you'll never have a second session with those players. First Night Rewards The first day and night of adventuring should end with the characters being rewarded for their efforts. Either their skills (or spells or other abilities) can bring them some physical reward (such as an Ophidian's superior sense of smell detecting truffles, or a Bestia hunter discovering a perfect site to set up camp), or they can learn something (such as discovering tracks leading away from the site where the wagon was found abandoned, indicating that the wagon was indeed attacked and, judging by the bootprints mixed among the bare footprints in the soft dirt, the driver abducted). Always give each player a chance to feel that they made a difference to the whole team, before their first period of rest. Assigning Watch Details Part of the fledgling party's duties may include watches. Who gets to sleep for four hours first; who has to stand watch for predators of all descriptions in the small hours; and who gets to be woken in the middle of a lovely dream, with hours to go before sunup. There is no need to play out each watch as its own scene, unless the Games Master has something planned for the party on their first night out. Not an ambush; something unexpected. Examples:- - The old ruins were once a thriving town, until it was abandoned by everybody but the ghosts. The night the Adventurers camp out in the ruins is the anniversary of the town's desertion, and this is always a night for the ghosts to come out and play. - The legend of a Parliament of Wolves in the area happens to be true. All the wolves gather nearby this night. Not all of them come on four legs. - The miscreants were from a non-human species (e.g. Bestia or Lili'tri). Most of the time, humans stay away from the communities of these non-human beings, but these raiders are outcasts from their communities, and the characters' activities have attracted the attention of a patrol of members of this species, who are basically doing the same thing they are. - An object falls from the sky, waking everybody up with a tremendous explosion nearby. The characters desert their camp to investigate. The First Real Conflict The Games Master should not drag out this first adventure. Its point is to bring the party together and unite them, allow the players to give the team an identity. Scenarios run in conventions are always one-shots, self-contained and designed to last no more than, say, four hours, wrapping up with an ending for each character; but even if you are planning a long campaign, this first adventure should not last more than one or two sessions, of four hours each. The first session establishes the party; the second pits them against their first ever antagonists, and the characters should have acquired enough information about the antagonists in the first session, or first half of the session, to know who they are up against in the second half, or second session. When pitting the characters against the antagonists, injuries on the players may hurt, but always stop short of Serious or Major Wounds or outright death. Characters may expect wounds, but nothing grievous. They should always come home, grinning and telling onlookers "You should see the other guy." Wrapping Up The First Scenario The Games Master must always challenge the characters with each scenario or story in their campaign, assuming you are running a campaign instead of a one-shot. The challenge of the first session of actual play must always be to get the player characters to play nice with each other and to have each other's backs when the inevitable conflict occurs. There will always be other challenges; but the first challenge should always be to turn a bunch of disparate heroes into a team, for the first time.
  6. Wrote up a bit of a review of The Smoking Ruins Adventure with some of my thoughts on what to change or add to the adventure. https://monstersandmusings.blogspot.com/2021/09/runequest-adventure-review-smoking-ruins.html
  7. The word "adventure" comes from Middle English: from Old French aventure (noun), aventurer (verb), based on Latin adventurus ‘about to happen’, from advenire ‘arrive’. It concerns things happening. Drama. Conflict. As any great screenwriter, playwright and storyteller will tell you, there are a lot of ways to stage and set a drama - many different sources of conflict. Let's look at some sources of drama. 90% of all drama and conflict is going to come from persons. The rest is environmental drama - floods, fires, wars, diseases, rioting, earthquakes, volcanoes, molasses tsunamis, and on and on. In other words, disasters. So the drama and conflicts which come from a person can be powerful things to overcome. Let's look at a few core elements which drive bad guys. Vanity: Arrogance; haughtiness; overconfidence; ambition; murder to prove a point; killing for oneupmanship; brinksmanship; and karening - calling in the law to harass innocents. Greed: Avarice; miserliness; corruption; offering bribes; accepting bribes; loss of touch with reality; Marie Antoinette "Let them eat cake" (even though she never said it, the image is still used as a valid lesson); valuing things over people; social inequality. Envy: Betrayal, after becoming a friend; murder; inferiority complex; poisoning the well; gossiping and smearing. Hatred: Bigotry; self-denial; mass murder; nationalism. Desire: An emotion almost never covered in roleplaying games. Lust; longing; stalking; obsession; crossing lines; ignoring boundaries. Fear: The enemy fears the protagonists, and will do everything in their power to detroy them. If the antagonist is powerful, this cam be a problem for the characters - but remember that the enemy fears them? This means that the enemy is aware of their vulnerability - and fears that the characters can exploit that vulnerability, or flat-out destroy the antagonist ... if the protagonists can work out what that vulnerability is, in time. Adventures begin when the player characters recognise the drama unfolding - the greedy tycoon sliding his grossly incompetent nephew into a position of authority with power over the player characters, or the group's "best friend" turning out to be someone who hates them after all, and has been feeding crucial intel to the bad guys all along - and do something about it. Their plans can go awry - their plan of directly assaulting the stronghold of the bad guy who's been smearing their name is thwarted by a bunch of laws, and a whole lot of guards - and they may be forced to adopt new plans, reject them, and come up with even more plans; but it's the act of trying to figure things out, and trying to come up with solutions, and thinking up strategies other than combat, which make an adventure. Moreover, the act of thinking on their feet, the uncertainty that they might fail and face worse than being reduced to zero hit points, is what makes adventures memorable. Opinion: I don't think you can ever find anything memorable about hack'n'slash dungeoneering without having a broader context for it. It's like eating mashed potato without salt or butter.
  8. Wrote up an Overview of the Adventure; Cattle Raid, which is in the GM's Adventure Book, that comes with the GM's Screen. You can check it out here on my blog.
  9. Hi folks, I'm from Brazil, and I started writing my ideas for CoC, and I'm going to publish them on the Miskatonic Repository. This is the first of them: http://tiny.cc/mi0zsz MYTHOS EXPLORERS #1 - DOOR TO THE SKY (PAMPHLET ADVENTURE) This is a pamphlet with an adventure structure for Call of Cthulhu 7th. Print, fold, and play. This is an ideal adventure for a short game, lasting an hour or two. The text presents the idea of a complete scenario, with scenes and clues and a new alternative rule for skills. Keepers can add their own ideas to create a bigger adventure or start a campaign. A few minutes of reading, some hours of fun. This pamphlet is great for one-shot games. Did you get together with friends and now want to play something quick, just for fun? One of your group's regular members missed the game, and you want to play an alternative scenario with a few hours of mystery? This adventure is for you. Just a few minutes of reading, and you will be ready to play. By purchasing this product, you will receive: • A two pages PDF with an adventure pamphlet. •A two pages PDF pamphlet with four Pre-Made Investigators. PDF files have layers with the options for COLOR and BLACK and WHITE. • Include files to print it on Letter and A4 paper sizes. This product may undergo regular proofreading. Check this page for the latest updates. If you find typos or grammar, have some suggestions and comments or think something needs to be different in this product, please let me know.
  10. View File Tinsdown The Tin Mines of Tindale So this a supplement and adventure module for my Town of Tindale Project. I wanted to make Tindale a place where my players adventurers could call home and set out to find glory from. This is one of hopefully many supplements for that goal. Maps and descriptions of Bowen Hamlet, as well as the buildings, shops, homes, and statistics/descriptions their inhabitants. Maps of the mine A quest involving the mine itself as well as three smaller side-treks that tie into the main quest. All mapped out with NPCs generated. The quests aren't big. Just enough to get your players acquainted with another part of the town of Tindale and its people. 3d imagery and maps from Neverwinter Nights 2 Toolset Submitter tooley1chris Submitted 08/23/2020 Category Magic World  
  11. Version 1.0.0

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    So this a supplement and adventure module for my Town of Tindale Project. I wanted to make Tindale a place where my players adventurers could call home and set out to find glory from. This is one of hopefully many supplements for that goal. Maps and descriptions of Bowen Hamlet, as well as the buildings, shops, homes, and statistics/descriptions their inhabitants. Maps of the mine A quest involving the mine itself as well as three smaller side-treks that tie into the main quest. All mapped out with NPCs generated. The quests aren't big. Just enough to get your players acquainted with another part of the town of Tindale and its people. 3d imagery and maps from Neverwinter Nights 2 Toolset
  12. Hi! I bring an Adventure seed. 🙂 This idea that came to me when I saw the image. Ritual to drive out "jack o'bears" and make them the others problem. If you are not going to develop and direct the adventure, better not continue. The PCs come to a clan or mountain village, depending on the area and culture. It seems that there are preparations for some kind of festivity and everyone is busy but happy. When see the PCs arrive, the people receive them with great joy and invite them to participate in the party. No one asks for money or barter; everything is free, food, drink, even shelter. Complete hospitality. All free? Well, they prefer foreigners for the ritual. It is a great honor, they just have to run around the area a bit. One of the PCs (the most appropriate) should put on the "rare bear" costume. The other PCs must flee from him along the path that leads them away from clan / village. Everything seems like a normal representation until the mythical world gains strength. The "bear" PC begins to feel a compulsion to catch and devour his prey, he could even feel the caress of Chaos. Meanwhile, his prey, the other PCs, transformed into heroes that maybe not recognize, feel the urge to get him away from there. Everything will end when they guide the beast to innocent travelers camped on the road or the edge of another village or clan, where the "bear" PC will find unaware victims. Is this how the story ends or will they take the risk to change it? What will happen to the "jack o'bear" PC if he devours human flesh during the Ritual? Photo owned by National Geographic.
  13. Hello all! I've got a short adventure written, titled The Throat of Winter, which I intend to publish with Chaosium's forthcoming Jonstown Compendium. I'm looking for one or two volunteer groups to playtest it and provide their thoughts. While it's not the first adventure I've written, it is the first I've put together with other people using it in mind. The adventure is set during winter, during the latter half of Dark season and the first half of Storm season. It's based on a site, the titular cave, which I've placed in the Starfire Ridges of the Colymar tribe's lands. However, the adventure is pretty modular, and I think it should be usable anywhere in Dragon Pass. I believe the adventure should be suitable for use with the pregenerated adventurers (Vasana et al) but I'd prefer to know how it interacts with house adventurers. I've also tried including suggestions for ongoing play as part of a campaign set in Apple Lane. Here's my current draft of the back cover copy: Winter descends on Dragon Pass. When the child Rolf goes missing while checking on his family sheep after a blizzard, his parents Rastolf and Serla become frantic. They come to the village of Apple Lane begging for help from any who will listen. They come seeking any who will brave the wind and snow of winter to find a little boy. They come seeking adventurers. This site-based adventure is intended to provide one to three sessions of RuneQuest: Roleplaying in Glorantha play for four to six beginning to intermediate adventurers. While it is integrated into the Colymar campaign provided in Chaosium's Gamemaster Screen Pack, this adventure is designed for use in any Dragon Pass campaign.
  14. Since I don't know that I can change the name of a topic, here I am. If you wish to chastise me, go ahead. I am going to be releasing a new adventure for OpenQuest and other d100 system games called "The Mirror Tells Her Lies", about saving a village and its leader from a force of "Pure Sin" centered in a haunted church. The project is in Kickstarter mode now and has already reached its funding threshold, but with seven days to go this is a chance to get your hands on it before anyone else does (like if you're a GM who doesn't want your players to know what happens before you do) or if you simply want to encourage people to support d100. Here's the URL: https://www.kickstarter.com/projects/mhpress/the-mirror-tells-her-lies As of right now, seven days remain to back the KS -- a bargain at $3 US for a copy in preorder. I also have a reward level that puts your name in the book as a Patron, which includes yo0ur copy. Unfortunately, the NPC reward is sold out.
  15. Version 1.0.0

    10 downloads

    A 5377-year campaign for Nephilim, running from 1378 BC to 3999 AD. Originally uploaded to yahoo group by jessejmulkey November 28, 2012
  16. Version 1.0.0

    9 downloads

    A Flashback adventure for Nephilim. Originally uploaded to yahoo group by jessejmulkey November 28, 2012
  17. Version 1.0.0

    6 downloads

    A translated french adventure (translated with babelfish) Just to get another perspective on neph. Originally uploaded to nephilim yahoo group by nephilimoneus Mar 2, 2004
  18. Version 1.0.0

    6 downloads

    Exactly what it says on the tin. A Tibetan adventure Originally uploaded by jp_james to the Nephilim Yahoo Group on Sep 15, 2001
  19. Version 1.0.0

    5 downloads

    An adventure set in the San Francisco Bay Area Originally uploaded by jp_james to the Nephilim Yahoo Group on Sep 15, 2001
  20. Version 1.0.0

    5 downloads

    An adventure where the players search for a piece of music. It's got a good spin on the Lovers in it. Originally uploaded by jp_james to Nephilim Yahoo Group Sep 11, 2001.
  21. Version 1.0.0

    6 downloads

    An adventure designed to get CoC players into Nephilim. It's set in France but is open enough to set anywhere. Originally uploaded by jp_james to Nephilim Yahoo Group Sep 11, 2001.
  22. Hello everyone. I don't have access to any of the earlier editions of Call of Cthulhu, but I do have the 7th edition books. Would anyone know if there is a place to get access to the 5th and 6th edition adventure called "Edge of Darkness"? I know it came with those editions, but again, I don't have access to them. Any help would be greatly appreciated.
  23. Version 1.0.0

    52 downloads

    This is the freeform two-hour 13th Age Glorantha demo we ran at GenCon 2018. It's designed to keep the game fresh for GMs by making every session different, using the player characters' stories and uniques to shape the action instead of having a set adventure. Six third level pre-gen characters included. Works for longer sessions also.
  24. GUIDE TO THE GALACTIC FRONTIER RPG Revolution D100 system Teaser 1 Teaser 2 Visit our Facebook Page for a sneak peek
  25. Version 1.0.0

    101 downloads

    During the playtest of Basic Roleplaying, my group and I converted tons of settings to see how they held up. Star Frontiers was one such setting. Here is the conversion of SF-0: Crash on Volturnus, the adventure that was originally included in the Star Frontiers boxed set. I didn't include the maps as I own the original adventure and just used them, however they can more then likely be found on the internet. Rod
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