Jump to content

Search the Community

Showing results for tags 'roleplaying'.

  • Search By Tags

    Type tags separated by commas.
  • Search By Author

Content Type


Forums

  • The Chaosium Forums
    • Basic Roleplaying
    • Glorantha
    • RuneQuest
    • Call of Cthulhu
    • Pendragon & Prince Valiant
    • QuestWorlds
    • Mythic Worlds
    • Cult of Chaos
  • The D100 Family
    • Mythras
    • D101 Games
    • Renaissance
    • Revolution D100
    • Legend
    • Quest21
    • Delta Green
  • Other Stuff
    • Alastor's Skull Inn
    • Inactive forums

Blogs

  • Blog Trifletraxor
  • Notes from Underground
  • Blog Chaot
  • Blog soltakss
  • Blog RosenMcStern
  • Blog threedeesix
  • Blog Triff
  • Blog Aycorn
  • Blog tzunder
  • Blog PZiviani
  • Blog Conrad
  • Mos Eisley Cantina
  • Blog alexraccoon
  • Blog raymond_turney
  • Blog Merak Gren
  • Blog rleduc
  • Dark moon Chronicles- setting and info
  • Blog threshold
  • Blog skull
  • Blog rpgstarwizard
  • Blog Vorax Transtellaris
  • Blog travellingbeetle
  • Blog Bleddyn
  • Blog kevinhun
  • Blog jagerfury
  • Blog coyote
  • Blog Dryhad
  • Blog Peter K.
  • Blog Robar
  • Blog Tester
  • Blog ptingler
  • Blog nerdvana
  • Blog Old Timer
  • Blog smjn
  • Blog Stoatbringer
  • Blog Target
  • Blog Moonowol67
  • Sunwolfe's Blog of Holding
  • The Reign of Dragons
  • Sparrowhawk's Roost
  • RPG Imaginings
  • The Bardori Saga
  • Amusing Musings
  • Red Cows in the Borderlands
  • Dethstrok9 YouTube Channel
  • Three go mad in Santos
  • Þáttr
  • An Anglo Saxon Chronicle
  • Things Go Off The Rails
  • "Genetic Defects" Short Science Fiction Story
  • Runequest Campaign Log
  • How one man became a king
  • Atalan: Before the Fall
  • Confessions of A Hypnotic Game Author
  • West of Arkham

Categories

  • RuneQuest in Glorantha
  • Generic
    • GORE
    • Alternate rules
    • GM Resources
    • Character sheets
  • Fantasy/Historic
    • Magic World
    • Mongoose RuneQuest
    • Middle Earth
    • Vhraeden
    • Warlords of Alexander
    • Classic RuneQuest
    • Ancient Rome
    • Fire and Sword
    • The Green
    • Other
  • Modern
    • Old West
    • Call of Cthulhu
    • Other
  • Science Fiction
    • Star Wars
    • Terminator
    • Halo
    • Other
  • Super Hero
    • City of Heroes
    • Superhero Characters
    • Other
  • Mythras
    • Classic Fantasy
  • Revolution D100

Find results in...

Find results that contain...


Date Created

  • Start

    End


Last Updated

  • Start

    End


Filter by number of...

Joined

  • Start

    End


Group


Member Title


RPG Biography


Current games


Location


Blurb


Website URL

Found 22 results

  1. Continuing my look into the four basic cultural backgrounds from the Mythras Core Rulebook. What, exactly, is a barbarian anyway? What distinguishes a Barbarian culture from a Primitive, Nomadic, or Civilised culture? The answer, shockingly, is nothing. "Barbarian" is a political definition - basically, it's "any culture that isn't ours." Technically, "barbarian" just means "foreign," or "outsider," just like "pagan" just means "country bumpkin" and "mundane" means "man of the world." It's only in gaming that barbarians are conflated into a generalised image of some shirtless, woad-daubed warrior types with braided beards and hair and helmets with horns. Technically, there really should be no Barbarians - just other people. However, fantasy games demand that barbarians exist, so what can you do? Barbarian Culture A Barbarian culture is one which does not follow the laws or mores of the civilised culture next door. That does not mean that they are Primitives, though it is feasible to have a culture which leans towards Primitive or Nomadic, yet retains an identity which is identifiable as Barbarian. Languages Barbarians could speak their own language, heavily accented, and either plain speaking or laden with idiomatic expressions. Half the fun of dealing with a Barbarian party encountered in the wild is figuring out which tribe they are, and which language and dialect they speak. Language defines territory, for the most part, and an Adventurer familiar with Barbarian cultures may have to fine tune their Lore to cover, for example, the Northern Lake People from the Northern Mountain People and the Northwestern Trading Tribespeople, even though they could all be classified as "The Northern People" to people from the Southern lands. Social Structure Generally, Barbarian cultures tend to be led by Chieftains, Thanes, and tribal leaders with similar titles. Rulership does not have to come at the end of a sword, nor does the title always go to the strong. A weak man may win the mantle through guile; a woman can rise to prominence as a great leader, uniting disparate tribes through trade and diplomacy yet also enforcing the accord between tribal nations by commanding strong armies, leading from the front. Clans and lineages of ancestry are common, with extended families being led by a Matriarch or Patriarch, and revered elders frequently making journeys to attend a Parliament, or Thing (pronounced "ting") of the tribes, to lay down the new laws for the year and to settle disputes between individuals and entire tribes. Knowledge of The Land Your Barbarian culture is highly likely to have just as extensive knowledge of Locale as their Primitive cousins. They are likely to have Animism as their primary source of magic, with some Mysticism and Folk Magic. Their literature, carried mostly in the head with the same oral traditions which sustained the Primitives, may tell of ancient gods and even older demons, those demons being the Primitive gods who were rendered obsolete by the new deities of the Barbarian tribes. The oral traditions are also likely to form the basis for their Locale and Lore skills - knowledge of where the healing herbs are, knowledge of how to cultivate crops, make the proper sacrifices to the land to allow travellers to pass without incident, and the best seasons to plant and to reap. The oral tradition ties the Barbarians to the land, perhaps even more deeply than it does the Primitive peoples. Laws Laws are kept in the minds of Lawkeepers, and mostly have to do with the placement of borders and bounds between the lands of different tribes, or matters of inheritance. Again, do not assume that only men may be Lawkeepers - imagine a Barbarian, tribal culture dominated by their women, ruling each tribe with a Triummulierate (the term for a Triumvirate of women) and laying down laws regarding the need to be honourable in conduct, whether that be in trade, diplomacy, or warfare. Some of the highest laws in Barbarian cultures concern hospitality. Many Barbarian tribes dwell in wilderness regions which would be considered inhospitable to a "civilised" citizen, and even to other Barbarians who are used to the land, to be exiled from the comforts of the hearth is effectively a death sentence. The presence of a warm hearth nearby can mean the difference between life and death - so there are laws of hospitality proscribing the conduct of both hosts and passing strangers. The offering of hospitality to a stranger who arrives in a storm is one of the highest expressions of the Barbarian culture's ethos. Hospitality is sacrosanct, and hosts are expected to offer a warm bed, hot food, and a place by the fire to strangers. Likewise, a stranger may accept hospitality (they'd be a fool not to), but they are required to behave with dignity and grace, and to express gratitude to their hosts (rather than try to seduce or murder them). Good feasting, good poetry and song, and - if the stranger is a healer - treatment of the sick of the household for free, are generally accepted as a cause for celebration. A stranger who can entertain the hosts, or help them, or stand with them and defend them, is considered a gracious visitor and their good reputation will spread. Trade and Diplomacy The same drives behind the treatment of strangers applies to trade and diplomatic relations. Representatives of other tribes, including "civilised" cultures, are feted like visiting kings, because the hosts are bound by the laws of hospitality. This extends to visiting bands of Adventurers passing through Barbarian territory: these are Barbarians, not bandits or brigands, and the Games Master should take great care not to just turn an encounter with Barbarians as just another random combat encounter. It's a cliche, it's been done to death, and you can do so much better. The Barbarian Voice So here, then, is my take on The Barbarian Voice. ++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++ We stumbled across the ragtag party of Southerners, close to sunset. They were still building their encampment in the worst possible place - exposed, high on a windswept hill particularly vulnerable to cold, high winds, and right next to a field of burial mounds prone to nightly hauntings. I ordered my men to stay silent and refrain from laughing. These Southerners seemed little more than children; and they seemed to be ill-equipped to handle the elements. They certainly had no awareness of the land, nor its hazards: one of them sought to pitch her flimsy tent right on top of a nest of firegrubs, and one of the party, a fancyman, was trying to erect their tent next to a tree ... on a hill prone to being struck by lightning in a storm. Indeed, there was a storm looming, and so I approached these wayward children, bringing with me one of my lovers, a man called Shanto - which means "Speaker of Truth in Many Tongues" - to ask the wanderers if they would like to share our fire tonight. Their response was predictably hostile. At our approach, they drew swords. The fancyman gestured to the sky, in a vain attempt to summon lightning to his aid. I did not have the heart to tell him that his vulgar sciences will not work on this sacred hill, if the spirits do not permit it. Instead, I let Shanto speak for me. I offered these frightened, ignorant children the chance to sit at our fire and share hospitality; a mark of respect, even to those who know not how to respect our highest laws. Fortunately, the fancyman knew both Shanto's language and his tribe, and spoke to him in greeting. Shanto told the fancyman to insist on speaking directly to me. It took some coaxing - apparently, the fancyman prefers the company of other men, or something- but eventually, he turned to me and stated his intent to seek out some treasure which was reputedly buried in the grounds of a ruined Southerner fort, abandoned to the wilds some two generations before even the summers of my Grandmother. I nodded, silently, and spoke to Shanto in my tongue, for him to translate, as was our custom, and made our offer. The young children gratefully accepted, and struck their tents and abandoned their futile attempt to light a fire on Windspirit Hill to join us at our camp. On the way back to the camp, Shanto spoke to me in my tongue, to let me know the strangers' plans, which they thought they could conceal from us by speaking in their Southerner tongue. I reminded Shanto that I could overhear them just as well as he, and that I was aware that they planned something nefarious with the artefact they sought. I also told Shanto that, should they survive the wilderness and the beasts which lurk around the Southerner fort, to return home with that prize they sought, that they may do what they like with it once they return home. In the end, if they are tested by the land and survive the tests, they would not need any artefact to seize power back home. They would be entitled to power in and of themselves, because the land will have tempered their strength beyond the capabilities of their fellow Southerners.
  2. No character exists in a vacuum. One of the most important, yet overlooked, aspects of Mythras gaming is connections - Allies, Contacts, even Rivals and Enemies. Much old school gaming tends to focus on player characters being self-contained agents of their lives, yet life doesn't work that way. Connections are part of every Session Zero. Every character should go through the process of creating a possible family, background events, and their Connections. This might seem like a waste of time to some players who might be champing at the bit for the chance to get into that dungeon and start slaughtering - but in fact, Connections can make the difference between a page full of empty, meaningless statistics, and a person whose achievements and accomplishments in adventures have meaning. Catalysts Connections can galvanise the player characters into action - problems arising in their lives can lead the characters into an adventure. Examples: - An old military buddy usually meets the characters every Monday afternoon to go bowling. On this Monday, he's not at his usual rendezvous, and the characters find that he is in the hospital with a stab wound in the back, and his home has been ransacked. The assailant was after something. There is one clue - their friend gave good fight, and landed a few telling blows, so they're looking for some guy who's as badly injured as their buddy is. - A younger family member has gone missing, and the characters have to track down her skeevy new associate, an older man. They track them down to a martial arts studio, where the older man discloses that she has been training under him to take on some college bullies. Now she, and the bullies, have gone dark. Nobody knows where they are, and the trainer hopes she won't get too much in trouble because she has been training with illegal kubotan melee weapons. - An old friend's father is dying, and his last words to the friend turn out to be a cryptic clue to a literally haunted treasure. Anchors Connections can keep the adventurers grounded. No matter how wild their adventures are, or where they go, the characters need someone to come home to, to share their lives and weird exploits. Apart from the characters themselves, their Connections might be the only people who are willing to entertain their wild war stories. - Some ex-service buddies hang around in a bar near the barracks, swapping war stories with some of the raw recruits who are allowed off base during furlough. - Former Banevio fighting school mystics gather around a fountain in a piazza in Semmi West and reminisce about the bouts they fought, and their old mentor, gone but not forgotten. - University alumni meet up once a month in one another's homes and talk about their urbex exploits in reputedly haunted houses, including an abandoned hospital where at least one of them can confirm that there is a definite presence, and it isn't some crook on the run, wearing a rubber monster mask to scare away the casuals. Networks Connections extend the characters' reach into places where the adventurers themselves cannot go. - A character with an Ally in one of the Familiar in Fioracitta could find a lead on a case which could drag the adventurer into a world of Fiorese organised crims or the Shadow Society. - An informant working for the Department could slip an agent a note under the door of the hotel she is staying in, with a warning that her cover's been blown and mercenaries are on their way to get her. - An associate of a notorious sorcery cabal can ask a Connection to deliver an invitation to haul them halfway across town to the cabal's chantry to talk about a possible job offer. - A friend of a friend of one of the Curators of The Occhiadero in Lascha District has obtained a copy of one of their tomes, teaching some vital Folk Magic the characters need. Backup Sometimes, the characters get into something they cannot handle. The Games Master can either have some of their Connections turn up (or pull strings and have some heavies go in to haul them out), or they can get the players to roleplay their Connections themselves, investigating the disappearance of the main characters. - That old buddy with the Family ties can call on the services of some friendly enforcers to back the characters' play if they are up against an overwhelming antagonist force. - The Banevio gym can send their finest students to help the characters to win a sporting contest for the honour of Little Fourche District against those Gioconda snobs. - That nice lady with the poison garden in Outer Gioconda can send spirits aplenty to help one of her Maledittara sisters on the spirit plane. Found Family Connections provide the adventurers with a found family, a place to belong, and a sense of involvement in a community. - The Department's teams are often closer than friends; closer than family. - Family is the place where nobody keep score or counts the favours owed. - 'ohana means family ... - Your mission, should you choose to accept it ... - It's time! Suit up, boot up and mask up! Brigadier Bay needs us! In The End The Connections forged during Session Zero should not be an afterthought. Whether they are the initial hook, the steadying influence, the backup, the found family, or the extension of the characters' reach, the Connections represent the ordinary people around whom the characters' lives revolve. As non-player characters controlled by the Games Master, the presence of Connections gives the Adventurers opportunities to communicate with the Games Master in character, in a way which avoids breaking the fourth wall and allows the players to remain in character. The Games Master can use the characters' Connections to help steer them towards answers when they are clueless; to warn them if they are about to try out something dangerous and stupid; and to give them roots into the background community they belong to. It's all about making the characters' stories meaningful and memorable, and giving the players something to really talk about at gaming conventions.
  3. Good Evening fellow mortals. If you would like to follow my RPG/YouTube journey (don't say I didn't warn you of the inherent danger in such an endeavor), come check you my channel Dethstrok9. This is the beginning of the end for me, but hopefully you shall find some enlightenment before you spontaneously rip your eyeballs out... I post every Wednesday, and this blog will keep you up to date on most of my videos. Thank you for reading, see you sooner than you think... https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC-m0ZQCOCX4QaNugbUAsTiA
  4. We’ve created a discord server for Call of Cthulhu called Necronomicon. We want to help unite the community who play this game not only to meet new, and awesome people but in addition to that help new players, and experienced find groups to play with. We want to help keep the game alive by making it easier for new players to find a group if they have difficulty in real life through the use of software & our custom made bot. By creating an expansive community we hope to use our custom bot to allow everyone to find a group to play with. We also have help channels which you can use if you have a quarrel with the rules of the game. As such you’ll receive live support instead of having to wait potentially hours or days for a response on the forums. We also plan to help events, say you have a live stream coming up to raise money for charity, just running an epic game or even hosting your own event in real life which is being streamed we’ll help promote it! However, to make this a success we need you, the community. By helping to spread this idea we’ll be able to develop a dedicated, mature and friendly community to entice even more people to play or even host their own sessions. Even if you only play the game at a table with your friends in real life you’ll still be a great asset to the community as well as the ability to meet like-minded people from across the globe you could even share a scenario you created with an easily accessible community. Our bot development team is creating an LFG tool to allow you to create games and then have new players join them, it’s currently still in development, at this current point in time you can create your own game and have others join it. You’ll then receive a private channel in order to play with your newly found group. As such, this is great for new players and through our combined efforts even more sessions will be running on the discord. Here’s a brief list of the current features which are accessible: A new users section with recommended platforms for online play if you’re only just thinking about hosting a game online (there are many benefits) We have a news and updates section which we will post news released by Chaosium and important updates so all you have to do is check out this section for your Cthulhu news. We also have a recommended YouTuber & twitch section for content creators that are worthy of your time if you’re looking for reviews on scenarios or just tips. Seth Skorkowsky is currently doing a series on the game system as a brief overview on the rules which I’d highly recommend if you’re thinking about picking up a copy of the rules. We have a help section which is provided by both Verified Keepers (a role which can be attained by request allowing you to access a private area of the discord so players do not have scenarios spoilt) as well as player provided assistance. As such you have a wide variety of assistance in the case you are unaware of what to do. We also reward players who help with certain roles, helping new players is greatly encouraged as remember, it’s them who will keep the game alive. A support section is accessible, this will allow you to ask help from staff as well as requesting an event. (not related to the game but rather the server, unless it’s an event) An entire discussions section for so you can talk to other players about Cthulhu, off-topic, Chaosium and more. You can also post any artwork you make in our artwork section. We will hold monthly competitions to help further the community such as a best Cthulhu related drawing, scenario creation, and more. A prize pool will be accessible for the winners. Voice channels to allow you to talk to other users A Keeper hub section for verified Keepers allowing you to discuss scenarios, leave reviews on whether you like them or not so Keepers can easily find out whether a scenario is worth purchasing, as well as help and a section to overcome a players disruption to your scenario/campaign. More features will be added as the community grows. We will welcome any ideas from our community. We hope to see you on our server shortly, help become apart of a hopefully ever-growing community so we can help attract new players to the game. Please invite your friends whom you play with so we can help build a base following which can then be built on through the attraction of new players! TLDR: We want to help further the community through the use of a group-finding bot making the game accessible to new players as well as those looking for a group to play with. We hope to make the game easier for new keepers, as well as experienced, to get help and find scenarios they may want to run with their group or find one of their own on the server. To conclude; by joining now you’ll be able to access everything Cthulhu related at the click of a button, the first 100 people to join will receive a special role to thank you for being the first members of an everlasting community. You’ll watch alongside us as this library of information continues to expand just like the universe. Hope to see you soon – Salt Join the cult today https://discord.gg/8yeAugS
  5. It is twenty years after the end of the global wars. Our world lies in ruin. Once-great cities are now nothing more than shattered hulks populated with bioengineered soldiers, giant rats, and rogue robots. This is the world of Rubble & Ruin, a setting inspired by the classic post-apocalyptic fiction of the 1970's and 80's, where players take the role of prospectors searching the rubble for surviving technology. Here you'll find a description of the ruined city and its denizens, a bestiary, information on hostile elements, common trade goods, and sample gangs. Character generation includes six cultures, seven new races, and a section for biomodifications, cybernetics, nano-psionics, and dozens of new failings. Spot Rules for barter, firearms, the building of and fighting from cars, and the prospector’s best friend; the common dog. Also includes two full-length adventures. By Rich LeDuc. 130 pages. Published by Chaosium April 2010.
  6. A Martial Artist's power comes from life-giving Chi, which suffuses the land of the Dragon Empire. It is your duty to use your martial skills and amazing Chi powers to protect the Forbidden City from the hungry ghosts, hopping vampires and Foreign Devils who murder and steal from the innocent. Use an expanded Martial Arts system that is compatible with any Basic Roleplaying game. Characters may employ real-life styles, like boxing or ninjitsu; mystical styles that stem from magic; or design their own styles with the tools provided. There are dozens of styles to choose from, and over one hundred Chi Powers. Explore the expansive Dragon Empire, where beauty and culture are marred by corruption and decadence. Due to high concentrations of Chi, magical spirits live alongside mortals. Players can choose to be humans, spirits, or something in between. Reap the rewards of piety: you might become Enlightened, find a position within the Celestial Bureaucracy, or even take a sip from the Elixir of Immortality. Dragon Lines is a game of high flying action. Characters can wade through hordes of Lesser Foes, and then duel with another Martial Arts masters. You can survive dangers which would slay ordinary mortals. Walk on water, run up walls and along rooftops, and harness the very powers of Heaven to shoot lightning from your fingertips! By Charles Green. 128 pages. Published by Alephtar Games March 2010.
  7. Aces High is a mythical western supplement. It’s a different time, a time where violence is an everyday occurrence on the frontier of Civilization. A time of six gun shoot outs, red skins on the war path, dying cowboys under a desert sun. A time where the people drag a living from the land of dreams. Violence is an everyday occurrence on the frontier of Civilization. Dust swirls around a crimson sun, reminding every one of their possible success, telling them of their mortality. Prospectors are raping the hills for precious metals; dumping their waste in the fresh, clear rivers. Buffalo hunters slaughter vast herds of buffalo for their valuable pelts, leaving a wake of rotting carcasses, a mountain of bone and skulls. The Law can barely cope, as lynch mobs leave cadavers hanging from the trees. The Redskins fight for their very existence, caught between death and degradation. The old powers cannot compete with the new power from the East. By Stuart Godbolt. 112 pages. Published by Chaosium March 2009.
  8. The year is 1092 in the Age of Itania. King Girart of Mirensa, villified as the killer of children, schemes to bring the Nine Kingdoms under his crown while Safiro of Tivonna engages magi and spies to thwart Girart's ambition. Mad King Bertrant of Ossirenza bears the burden to defend the lands of Men against marauding Krek even as his galleys war on Tivonnan ships to satisfy his raging temperament. In the wild North the rangers, always outnumbered, battle the depredations of ruthless Kyaksa tribesmen who strike from mountain strongholds. In the steppes to the east the Solok tribes battle each other to satisfy the blood-lust of their gods and raid the West for its riches. The Vashaniin, an ancient and prideful people, spurn involvement in the affairs of Men while they prepare for the coming of a threat more dire than any of the petty squabbles of the West - an enemy that even now may be probing the defenses of the gray walls of the mountains of the Eastern Divide. By James Brian King. 136 pages. Published November 2010 by Chaosium. TarsaPreview.pdf
  9. The village wise-woman creating herbal mixtures to cure her neighbours of the latest plague to curse their homes, the crone who disguises herself as a beautiful young woman to entice men to their doom, the travelling warlock who trades in potions and talismans which may or may not be truly magical. These are all examples of witches; men and women for whom witchcraft is an art and a profession. Within this monograph you will find new spells common to witches, rules for brewing magic potions and rules for creating talismans - a new kind of one-shot magic item in which the witch invests a portion of their soul for a short time. There are also descriptions of various witches’ organisations, and optional allegiance rules for flavouring magic ‘black’ or ‘white’. BRP: Witchcraft is a monograph best suited to Dark Ages, High Medieval, High Fantasy, Arabian Nights and Renaissance settings. However, there is nothing to stop you playing a modern witch selling magic potions under the table at a local diner or an apocalypse survivor rediscovering the old ways. By Byron Alexander. 76 pages. Published by Chaosium December 2010.
  10. In Search of the Trollslayer is classic beer-and-pretzel dungeon-crawl filled with monsters, traps, and treasure! Your players will need to use their brawn as well as their wits to survive this dungeon. It is designed for 3-6 characters of Heroic Campaign power level. Other power levels may be used with some adjustment to encounters and obstacles. It is also suggested that the players create their characters using the total hit point option, as this will allow for a much more dynamic and exciting adventure. It is recommended that the party include at least one Wizard or Sorcerer, as there are several obstacles that will require their arcane skills to get past. This scenario is set in a dank and dismal swamp but could be placed in any campaign world with a few minor modifications. Three hundred years ago a brave human hero named Sir Tolwar was slain while leading an epic charge during the height of the Troll Wars. The body of the knight was never found but, because of his bravery, the tide of the war turned and Sir Tolwar became revered as a Saint. A brotherhood was formed that honored the knight, and they erected a shrine on the very site of the battlefield where Sir Tolwar was slain. They called themselves the Brotherhood of the Lance in reference to the weapon Sir Tolwar wielded on that fateful day — a golden spear called Kerok, the Trollslayer. Word of the shrine spread. Pilgrims thronged to this holy place, where to behold the spear of the saint could cure disease, heal the sick, or bestow courage for those going forth into battle. At first The Brotherhood accepted only donations for the upkeep of the shrine. But soon greed began to take root within their ranks. They began to charge great sums of money to look upon Kerok, causing those who truly needed the help of the saint to be turned away. The Brotherhood began to purchase farmland surrounding the shrine, demanding the serfs that worked it to pay exorbitant rents. As the years passed the Brotherhood of the Lance became nothing more than a cruel landlord. The greed and selfishness of the brotherhood angered the gods. They summoned a mighty cataclysm which shook the earth and flooded the Order’s holdings, creating the Dread Swamp. The monks themselves were transformed into hideous creatures haunting the catacombs of the shrine. Now the shrine is all but forgotten; a ruin rotting in the middle of the Dread Swamp. But legend has it that Kerok the Trollslayer, the lance of Sir Tolwar, remains hidden within the walls of the forgotten shrine, waiting to be claimed by any adventurer willing to retrieve it. By Troy Wilhelmson. 48 pages. Published by Chaosium May 2009.
  11. A complete and easy to play Fantasy Roleplaying game, with monsters, magic and exotic locales. OpenQuest uses the classic D100 rules mechanic, which uses percentages to express the chance of success or failure.Open Quest is based on the Mongoose RuneQuest SRD (MRQ SRD), with ideas from previous editions of Chaosium’s RuneQuest and Stormbringer 5th, mixed in with some common sense house rulings from the author’s twenty years of experience with the D100 system. Final Edition. Character Generation: • Points buy by default, both for skills and characteristics (although there are optional rules for Random Characteristic generation) • Players come up with a concept for their character and build it the way they want. • Default rules produce jack of all trades characters, which are capable in combat, magic and practical skills. • Optional specialist character rules to produce characters who are more warrior or magician in concept. Character Improvement: • Characters gain improvement points for completing goals and entertaining play. • Players may then spend as they see fit on automatic skills and magic advancement. Skills: • Many skills are more groups of broad skills. For example Sleight, Hide and Stealth are all grouped together as Deception. This results in a streamlined and much shortened skill list. • Gone is the ‘golf bag’ of weapons skills, replaced by Close Combat, Ranged Combat and Unarmed. • Modifiers only added when they bring a big impact into play. Either plus or minus 25% or 50%. No more fiddly adding or subtracting of a +5% or -10% here and there. • Clear guidelines of when to call for a skill test and when not to. Combat: • Combat rounds are 5 sections of time, were combatants act in DEX order (INT if casting spells) • New combat manoeuvres available for all to speed up combat and make it more exciting • Characters with combat skills over 100% may split their attacks and defences to take on mulitple opponents. • No Hit Locations (although easy enough to add back in). • Damage taken directly off a Hit Points total, based on SIZ + CON divided by two. • Major Wounds (as seen in Stormbringer) an optional system. Magic: • Three approaches to magic: Battle, Divine and Magic. • All characters have some Battle Magic as default. • Summoning and Enchantment built into each approaches. • Specialists : Shamans, Priests, Holy Warriors , Adepts and Magus. • Sorcery now completely based upon one ‘Sorcery Casting’ Skill. This is the chance to cast a spell and limits the amount that the spell’s range, magnitude and duration can be manipulated. Creatures: • Twenty five monsters detailed. • Along with common domestic and giant animals. The Empire of Gatan: • A straightforward fantasy setting, with enough detail to pick up and play but enough room for Games masters to make it their own. The Road Less Travelled: • This is an introductory scenario suitable for beginning players and Games Masters • It is designed to give a general introduction to most of the rules systems Everything in the core OpenQuest rule book, except the illustrations by Simon Bray, is open gaming content under the Open Gaming Licence. This means that you can use all or part of the book to produce your own games, rules, adventures even for commercial release as long as you include the Open Gaming Licence included in the back of the book. By Newt Newport, with Tim Bancroft, Simon Bray, Paul Michener, John Ossoway, Graham Spearing and Tom Zunder. 182 pages. Published by D101 Games September 2010.
  12. This supplement is a companion book for the Aces High setting. Incident at Alice is split into two sections; the first section is concerned with historical, geographical and societal issues that will allow the Master to explore some of the land of New Mexico during the appropriate period. The second section is a scenario which will allow the players to interact with some of the people and creatures that live here. In the scenario the characters will be involved in a bank raid and will chase an Apache outlaw across rugged terrain. Along the way they will begin to learn of the supernatural entities called the Kachina, sacred, mythical spirits of the Pueblo dwellers religion. The Puebloans themselves have a long and, at times, dark history. Some of which waits to be discovered in one of their forgotten, holy sites. The characters may begin to understand that not all Native Americans are the same. Being able to tell the difference between the thoughtful, artistic Puebloans and the warlike, aggressive Apache will give the characters some insight into the many divergent philosophies that are endemic of the native populations. In the end, learning this difference may be the weapon that allows the characters to succeed or fail in their quest. By Stuart Godbolt. To be submitted to Chaosium by October 2011.
  13. Blood and Badges contains the 9 winning entries for the 2010 BRP Adventure Contest: • I Sette Magnifici Bastardi by Kevin Ross (spaghetti western) • Blood and Badges by Jon Hook (western horror) • The Goblin Hoss by Kevin Scrivner (western horror) • In the Frozen Darkness by R.J. Christensen (fifties horror) • Out with a BANG by Tom Lynch (cyberpunk) • The Haunted Bridge by Rich LeDuc (fantasy) • Company Town: Stepchildren of the Night by Mike Czaplinski (humorous conspiracy) • From Pagania with Hate by Marko Ercegovi’c “Streebor” (medieval horror) • The Prison of Outlaws by Simon Yee (dystopian alternate history) 132 pages. Published by Chaosium June 2011.
  14. Chaosium Incorporated has entered a contest to win a grant for up to $250,000. The contest is called Mission: Small Business and Chaosium Inc. has entered to be considered as a recipient, but they need our help. Please vote for Chaosium Inc. before the deadline on June 30th. It would be great for one of the oldest and smallest gaming companies to have a chance to win $250,000, we all know it could go a long way with Chaosium Inc. The information that voters need is: Name of Business: Chaosium Inc. State: California City: Hayward They already have 7 votes, another 243 and they will be eligible for consideration.
  15. Ashes to Ashes is a dark fantasy setting where wizards deliberately broke the world around a century Ago. The remnants of a mighty, high fantasy civilization litter the world, but civilization is no longer great. It's now a world of poverty, low magic and scarce resources, where people struggle to survive. This setting casts the players as mavericks in a fantasy world that is losing a war it does not even know that it is fighting. Hidden demons and their mortal minions, many of whom do not even know who their masters truly are, manipulate events from the shadows, experimenting with social control mechanisms to steer the human cattle in the direction that they want them to go. The adventurers' goal is to discover and stop them. Ashes to Ashes is a role-playing-heavy, philosophy-heavy, conflict-heavy type of game that would be best enjoyed by serious-minded folk. Ashes to Ashes must, if run correctly, continually force the players to face moral dilemmas. Two introductory scenarios have been included. By Jeff Moeller. 180 pages. Published by Chaosium June 2008. Supplement for this setting: Dust to Dust
  16. Basic Creatures presents an assortment of creatures useful to players of Basic Roleplaying. These critters are drawn from a variety of eras and genres of fantasy and fiction, including: Allosaurus, Baboon, Bandersnatch, Basikisk, Bear, Behemoth, Brontosaur, Centaur, Crocodile, Duck, Dwarf, Elemental, Elf, Ghost, Giant, Gorgon, Griffin, Halfling, Harpy, Headhanger, Horse, Insect Swarm, Lion, Lizard, Manticore, Minotaur, Mummy, Nymph. Octopus, Ogre, Orc, Plesiosaur, Satyr, Sea Serpent, Skeleton, Spirit, Tiger, Troll, Unicorn, Vampire, Werewolf, Whale, Wolf, Wraith, Wyrm, Wyvern, and Zombie. By Sandy Petersen and Steve Perrin. 52 pages. Published by Chaosium April 2009. (Note: Basic Creatures is basically a reprint of the creature chapter from RuneQuest 3 with the references to Glorantha removed).
  17. Here are the winning entries from the 2009 Chaosium BRP Adventure Contest. Explore mythic Australia, battle for lost New Caledonia, assist Boston police in a kidnapping, and make a strategic strike against the Nazi Occult Bureau in the 1930s! These and other adventures take place in different times and places, for Basic Roleplaying and the Basic Roleplaying Quickstart rules. 168 pages total. THE ADVENTURES INCLUDE: The Battle for New Caledonia, by Oscar Rios. The River Terror, by William Noble. Save Me an Angel, by R.J. Christensen. OPERATION: Mind Storm, by Jon Hook. The King, The Maiden, and the Mad Man of Las Islas de los Muertos, by Kenneth Spencer. The Guns of Nero’s Rome, by Michael Silverling. The Soul of Ra Mihn Nudal, by Kevin Scrivner. The Twin Circle Defenders, by Bruce Thompson. The Burmese Extravaganza, by Patrice Crespy. Fools Rush In, by Tom Lynch. Incident at Vasir Station, by Greg White. By many authors. 168 pages. Published by Chaosium October 2009.
  18. BRP Adventures presents thirteen adventures for the Basic Roleplaying system. These are drawn from the submissions from the first Basic Roleplaying Adventure Contest. Organized by genre, these stories illustrate the versatility of BRP and its adaptability to different kinds of storytelling. The following are the general genres and adventures included: • Fantasy: Sharazar, by Andrei Baltakmans. Travelers of Ka'rang, by Chad Bowser. King John's Treasure, by Jean-Philipe Chapleau. The Caravan, by Sverre Larne. • Horror: The Sign of the Goat, by Guy dondlinger. • Alternate Realities: Going Up the Country, by R.J. Christensen. The Black Book, by Stuart Godbolt. Daybreak Tomorrow, by Rich Leduc. Escape From the Slavelands, by Sarah Newton. Terror At 6666 Feet, by Matt Steele. Ruin Nation, by Jason Williams. The Time Share, by Simon Yee. • Science Fiction: Planet-Fall, by Bruce Thomson. By many authors. 168 pages. Published by Chaosium March 2009.
  19. Basic Gamemaster provides wisdom and advice on running Basic Roleplaying games. There are five main sections: the first discusses the duties of the gamemaster in devising and presenting roleplaying adventures. The second covers scenario-construction aids for the gamemaster including encounter tables, languages, treasures, and danger-classes. The third treats the social organization postulated in the Basic Roleplaying rules, particularly as they affect adventurer occupations, income, magic and so forth. The fourth explores ships and the sea; supplementary rules to use in your game. Finally, a ready-to-play scenario is presented, intended to be used with the average beginning adventurer group. By Greg Stafford, Charlie Krank, Ken Rolston, Sandy Petersen & Steve Perrin. 48 pages. Published by Chaosium May 2009. (Note: Basic Magic is basically a reprint of the gamemaster chapter from RuneQuest 3 with all references to Glorantha removed).
  20. This tome of a book collects all the rules and options for one of the most original and influential role playing game systems in the world. From its origin, Basic Roleplaying was designed to be intuitive and easy to play. Character attributes follow a 3D6 curve, and the other Basic Roleplaying mechanics are even simpler. Virtually all rolls determining success or failure of a task are determined via the roll of percentile dice. The core virtues of the system are as evident today as they were when it was first introduced. Primary characteristics of Basic Roleplaying that have emerged from decades of play, across many different varieties of the system are as follows: • The system is remarkably friendly to newcomers. It is easy to describe the basics of the game system, and the percentile mechanics, to non-gamers. • Players of other game systems often find Basic Roleplaying to be much less mechanistic and less of a barrier to the actual act of roleplaying. Less time spent on game systems usually equals more time available for roleplaying and thinking “in character.” • Most of the information players need to know is present on their character sheets. • Characters tend to evolve based on practicing the skills they use the most. They do not arbitrarily gain experience in skills and qualities based on ephemeral elements such as levels or experience ranks. • Combat can be very quick and deadly, and often the deciding blow in a conflict is the one to land first. • Basic Roleplaying is remarkably modular: levels of complexity can be added or removed as needed, and the core system works equally well with considerable detail as it does with a minimal amount of rules. The internal consistency of Basic Roleplaying allows for rules judgments to be made rapidly and with little searching through the rulebook for special cases. This book represents a first for Basic Roleplaying—a system complete in one book, without a defined setting. Previously, Basic Roleplaying has been an integral part of standalone games, usually with rich and deep world settings. Due to differences in these settings, Basic Roleplaying has had many different incarnations. Variant and sometimes contradictory rules have emerged between versions, to better support one particular setting over another. Chaosium’s Basic Roleplaying system reconciles these different flavors of the system and brings many variant rules together between the covers of one book, something that has never been done before. Some of these rules are provided as optional extensions, some as alternate systems, and others have been integrated into the core system. By design, this work is not a reinvention of Basic Roleplaying nor a significant evolution of the system. It is instead a collected and complete version of it, without setting, provided as a guide to players and gamemasters everywhere and compatible with most Basic Roleplaying games. It also allows the gamemaster the ability to create his or her own game world (or worlds), to adapt others from fiction, films, or even translate settings from other roleplaying games into Basic Roleplaying. By Jason Durall and Sam Johnson. 400 pages. Published by Chaosium May 2008.
  21. Val-du-Loup is a setting for medieval adventures using the BRP roleplaying system. It details a backwards, danger-fraught region of the dense, primal Ardennes forests, and is intended to serve for either an Early or a High Middle Ages setting. The Church wields little influence among the counties and baronies along the river Loup. Christian fervor clash with Frankish and Celtish traditions. Barons feud for land, while greedy princes grab the last tidbits left of the Empire. The monograph contains the following sections: • The Player Section: A primer on life in the Middle Ages - medieval society, knighthood, castles, military orders, medieval cities, universities and religion. Detailed information about the setting itself, i.e. the region of Val-du-Loup: the ruling families, assorted personalities (nobles, clergy and commoners) and a lengthy gazetteer of important and interesting locations. Character Creation with suggestions on how to involve player characters in adventures set in Val-du-Loup; and a character sheet designed for a medieval setting. • The Gamemaster Section: The Bestiary with random encounter tables, The Mythos Bestiary, secrets and background for the main personalities and villains in the campaign including game statistics for all major characters and some stock characters. • Adventures: This section includes two complete adventures: A Black Heart and Prelude to War; two adventure synopses; and finally a list of story seeds. By Guy Dondlinger. 160 pages. Published by Chaosium July 2009.
  22. The activity in the hive have slowed down a bit, warranting a consolidation of two forums. Again, the bigger one ate a smaller one, so that all the post from the former "Outside the hive" forum have been moved to the "Basic Roleplaying" forum. The description of the forum have also been changed, to include "anything RPG related." So basically, one forum to rule them all, and one forum for the supplements. Cheers, Sverre.
×
×
  • Create New...