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Found 4 results

  1. Here's a 3d printable terrain system thats sized for Cthulhu miniatures in case any of you are interested. https://www.facebook.com/rocketpiggames?pnref=story Its in 3x3 sized pieces with 2 inch high walls. The first lineup will be Dungeons, Caverns and Sewers. There will be a gothic victorian city later in 2017 Debut video of the Tilescape Modular Building System™ Here you can see the three main components of the system: the tile, the frame, and the link. This example is to show how easy it is to use, how secure the connections are, and how perfect it is for tabletop gaming! This is just the tip of the iceberg. Our Tilescape DUNGEONS core set consists of 30 pieces (and that is ONLY the Dungeon core) to interchange for endless dungeons. There are tons of possibilities and lots more you can do with this system...tune in for more videos, pictures, and demonstrations! Don't forget to like our Facebook Page: https://www.facebook.com/rocketpiggames Don't forget to join our Forum: http://rocketpiggames.freeforums.net/
  2. Hello, I have recently met a problem which might be my misunderstanding, but seems to be a severe bug in a system. Namely, throwing a weapon, that is not designed for throwing, e.g. halberd. The book says: "Your character can usually add 1/2 of his or her damage bonus to an improvised thrown weapon’s base damage. Well-balanced objects designed for throwing (including footballs, grenades, darts, etc.) can be thrown normally one meter for every point your character’s STR exceeds the SIZ of the object. Unbalanced objects can be thrown one meter for every 3 points of STR over the object’s SIZ." The question is: what is " improvised thrown weapon’s base damage" ? One of my players wanted to throw a double handed sword and use normal damage from that weapon+1/2 of his db. Now imagine the following: Standard Human ( STR 12 , SIZ 10 - thus no Damage Bonus ), is facing an enemy. The character has no skills in any weapon, but has halberd in his hand. Thus, he has base chance to hit of 15%. However, if he tries to throw a halberd at the enemy the chance becomes 25% (base Throw). Therefore, it is clear that throwing is more likely to inflict the same 3D6 damage. To me, this is pure nonsense. Perhaps I do not understand something - please help! Thanks! Krzysztof
  3. A complete and easy to play Fantasy Roleplaying game, with monsters, magic and exotic locales. OpenQuest uses the classic D100 rules mechanic, which uses percentages to express the chance of success or failure.Open Quest is based on the Mongoose RuneQuest SRD (MRQ SRD), with ideas from previous editions of Chaosium’s RuneQuest and Stormbringer 5th, mixed in with some common sense house rulings from the author’s twenty years of experience with the D100 system. Final Edition. Character Generation: • Points buy by default, both for skills and characteristics (although there are optional rules for Random Characteristic generation) • Players come up with a concept for their character and build it the way they want. • Default rules produce jack of all trades characters, which are capable in combat, magic and practical skills. • Optional specialist character rules to produce characters who are more warrior or magician in concept. Character Improvement: • Characters gain improvement points for completing goals and entertaining play. • Players may then spend as they see fit on automatic skills and magic advancement. Skills: • Many skills are more groups of broad skills. For example Sleight, Hide and Stealth are all grouped together as Deception. This results in a streamlined and much shortened skill list. • Gone is the ‘golf bag’ of weapons skills, replaced by Close Combat, Ranged Combat and Unarmed. • Modifiers only added when they bring a big impact into play. Either plus or minus 25% or 50%. No more fiddly adding or subtracting of a +5% or -10% here and there. • Clear guidelines of when to call for a skill test and when not to. Combat: • Combat rounds are 5 sections of time, were combatants act in DEX order (INT if casting spells) • New combat manoeuvres available for all to speed up combat and make it more exciting • Characters with combat skills over 100% may split their attacks and defences to take on mulitple opponents. • No Hit Locations (although easy enough to add back in). • Damage taken directly off a Hit Points total, based on SIZ + CON divided by two. • Major Wounds (as seen in Stormbringer) an optional system. Magic: • Three approaches to magic: Battle, Divine and Magic. • All characters have some Battle Magic as default. • Summoning and Enchantment built into each approaches. • Specialists : Shamans, Priests, Holy Warriors , Adepts and Magus. • Sorcery now completely based upon one ‘Sorcery Casting’ Skill. This is the chance to cast a spell and limits the amount that the spell’s range, magnitude and duration can be manipulated. Creatures: • Twenty five monsters detailed. • Along with common domestic and giant animals. The Empire of Gatan: • A straightforward fantasy setting, with enough detail to pick up and play but enough room for Games masters to make it their own. The Road Less Travelled: • This is an introductory scenario suitable for beginning players and Games Masters • It is designed to give a general introduction to most of the rules systems Everything in the core OpenQuest rule book, except the illustrations by Simon Bray, is open gaming content under the Open Gaming Licence. This means that you can use all or part of the book to produce your own games, rules, adventures even for commercial release as long as you include the Open Gaming Licence included in the back of the book. By Newt Newport, with Tim Bancroft, Simon Bray, Paul Michener, John Ossoway, Graham Spearing and Tom Zunder. 182 pages. Published by D101 Games September 2010.
  4. This tome of a book collects all the rules and options for one of the most original and influential role playing game systems in the world. From its origin, Basic Roleplaying was designed to be intuitive and easy to play. Character attributes follow a 3D6 curve, and the other Basic Roleplaying mechanics are even simpler. Virtually all rolls determining success or failure of a task are determined via the roll of percentile dice. The core virtues of the system are as evident today as they were when it was first introduced. Primary characteristics of Basic Roleplaying that have emerged from decades of play, across many different varieties of the system are as follows: • The system is remarkably friendly to newcomers. It is easy to describe the basics of the game system, and the percentile mechanics, to non-gamers. • Players of other game systems often find Basic Roleplaying to be much less mechanistic and less of a barrier to the actual act of roleplaying. Less time spent on game systems usually equals more time available for roleplaying and thinking “in character.” • Most of the information players need to know is present on their character sheets. • Characters tend to evolve based on practicing the skills they use the most. They do not arbitrarily gain experience in skills and qualities based on ephemeral elements such as levels or experience ranks. • Combat can be very quick and deadly, and often the deciding blow in a conflict is the one to land first. • Basic Roleplaying is remarkably modular: levels of complexity can be added or removed as needed, and the core system works equally well with considerable detail as it does with a minimal amount of rules. The internal consistency of Basic Roleplaying allows for rules judgments to be made rapidly and with little searching through the rulebook for special cases. This book represents a first for Basic Roleplaying—a system complete in one book, without a defined setting. Previously, Basic Roleplaying has been an integral part of standalone games, usually with rich and deep world settings. Due to differences in these settings, Basic Roleplaying has had many different incarnations. Variant and sometimes contradictory rules have emerged between versions, to better support one particular setting over another. Chaosium’s Basic Roleplaying system reconciles these different flavors of the system and brings many variant rules together between the covers of one book, something that has never been done before. Some of these rules are provided as optional extensions, some as alternate systems, and others have been integrated into the core system. By design, this work is not a reinvention of Basic Roleplaying nor a significant evolution of the system. It is instead a collected and complete version of it, without setting, provided as a guide to players and gamemasters everywhere and compatible with most Basic Roleplaying games. It also allows the gamemaster the ability to create his or her own game world (or worlds), to adapt others from fiction, films, or even translate settings from other roleplaying games into Basic Roleplaying. By Jason Durall and Sam Johnson. 400 pages. Published by Chaosium May 2008.
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