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Gygantar

Call of Cthulhu rpg 8th edition?

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Hello!  I'm getting started in CoC rpg, and invested a lot in new books, dices and minis, and it struck me that the 7th edition has been there for a little while...Is there an 8th edition peeking out soon?  Just wanted to know.  Thank you.

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I think it's a good question. We've seen other games get new editions frequently and some games stay the same for decades. My feelings are that I'm sure at some point in the future there will be an 8th edition but that I'm not expecting it anytime soon. 7th edition seems to be doing very well and growing quite a lot in player base. From what Mike Mason says of future products it seems like they've got ideas for books (and dare I say box sets?) for many years to come.

Personally I don't see any reason for a new version. Pulp Cthulhu adds a different style of play without requiring a new version and the nature of CoC being that you can pretty much set it in any time period and add/remove a few skills and you're good to go really. 

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The planned 7th edition versions of Gaslight and Dreamlands haven't even been scheduled for publication yet, and the new Malleus Monstrorum is still being written.  It's going to be a quite while before there's any pressure for a different edition of the basic rules.   For gamers used to more frequent turnover of editions, especially those that require purchasing entirely new libraries, CoC will feel like a welcome change of pace.

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I think it's good for at least a decade

Edited by Mankcam
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A new edition of any game, as opposed to a new printing with minor corrections or updates, ought to be done with a strong specific goal in mind. That can be different for the publisher than for the consumer, of course. At the moment I'm not sure that there would be an obvious benefit and direction for an eighth edition to take. The 7th seems to be doing well enough and I've certainly heard no rumours about its imminent demise.

Gygantar, are you asking so that you can avoid getting caught out buying something about to be updated, or do you have particular thoughts for something you'd like which doesn't seem to be part of the core books at the moment?

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9 hours ago, BigJackBrass said:

A new edition of any game, as opposed to a new printing with minor corrections or updates, ought to be done with a strong specific goal in mind. That can be different for the publisher than for the consumer, of course. At the moment I'm not sure that there would be an obvious benefit and direction for an eighth edition to take. The 7th seems to be doing well enough and I've certainly heard no rumours about its imminent demise.

Gygantar, are you asking so that you can avoid getting caught out buying something about to be updated, or do you have particular thoughts for something you'd like which doesn't seem to be part of the core books at the moment?

The former!  Since I invested a lot in a short time, I dont want to be left behind on short notice with outdated stuff.  Though I have to say I'm impressed by this system and 7th edition.  It's worth the buy.  Thank you for your answer.

 

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On 8/4/2019 at 4:09 PM, NotRussellCrowe said:

I think it's a good question. We've seen other games get new editions frequently and some games stay the same for decades. My feelings are that I'm sure at some point in the future there will be an 8th edition but that I'm not expecting it anytime soon. 7th edition seems to be doing very well and growing quite a lot in player base. From what Mike Mason says of future products it seems like they've got ideas for books (and dare I say box sets?) for many years to come.

Personally I don't see any reason for a new version. Pulp Cthulhu adds a different style of play without requiring a new version and the nature of CoC being that you can pretty much set it in any time period and add/remove a few skills and you're good to go really. 

You got me right.  I have seen other games move very fast.  Thank you for your answer.

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On 8/4/2019 at 4:27 PM, klecser said:

I seem to recall someone at Chaosium saying that they considered this the "definitive edition" of Call of Cthulhu. 

I have to say I'm impressed by this system.  I could actually believe that.

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On 8/4/2019 at 5:21 PM, Travern said:

The planned 7th edition versions of Gaslight and Dreamlands haven't even been scheduled for publication yet, and the new Malleus Monstrorum is still being written.  It's going to be a quite while before there's any pressure for a different edition of the basic rules.   For gamers used to more frequent turnover of editions, especially those that require purchasing entirely new libraries, CoC will feel like a welcome change of pace.

That's reassuring, thank you.

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12 hours ago, Mankcam said:

I think it's good for at least a decade

Its been going on for a while (all editions altogether).  I believe you.

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Heres the thing about Call of Cthulhu. The differences in editions are mild. 7th edition is the biggest leap forward in difference in the game since 1st to 2nd edition CoC. Those changes are going from 3-18+ attributes to percentile based, clarification of chase rules, simplification of melee (material pf weapon use to matter for parry),  addition of push rolls, and bonus and penalty dice with caps.  Infact I use the 5th edition Dreamlands source book.  Unlike Dungeons and Dragons the BRP based games have not really change all that much. They evolve gradually and changes of edition are more or less done for refinement and clarification and not to invalidate your library.

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On 8/5/2019 at 5:21 AM, Gygantar said:

Hello!  I'm getting started in CoC rpg, and invested a lot in new books, dices and minis, and it struck me that the 7th edition has been there for a little while...Is there an 8th edition peeking out soon?  Just wanted to know.  Thank you.

There are no plans whatsoever for an 8th edition.

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I wouldn't be against an 8th edition. Or a 7.5. This is what I'd like to see in one:

  • Just one Core book instead of two
  • Updated to the new (and really nice) layout
  • Remove the 20s as the main setting. Mention all the important settings in the same length, or do not go into setting details and make a 20s book (as we have Pulp and Western) I know it's really subjective but I prefer the 30s, the 80s and the modern (2000-2020) to the 20s. 
  • Regardless of the previous point, include all the mechanical information for all settings (skills, weapons, etc)

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I think they dropped the ball in not maling it clear but there is only one rule book. The Keepers Rule Book is the core rule book. It has all the core rules and everything needed and more to play.  The Investigators handbook just has expanded character options, all the  1920s background info and guidance on how to play a investigator with out being killed, by tge usual techniques.

So if they do a updated release dont call it the keepers rule book, call it the Core Rule Book, as that also slowed down my acquisition. 

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1 hour ago, stadi said:

I wouldn't be against an 8th edition. Or a 7.5. This is what I'd like to see in one:

  • Just one Core book instead of two
  • Updated to the new (and really nice) layout
  • Remove the 20s as the main setting. Mention all the important settings in the same length, or do not go into setting details and make a 20s book (as we have Pulp and Western) I know it's really subjective but I prefer the 30s, the 80s and the modern (2000-2020) to the 20s. 
  • Regardless of the previous point, include all the mechanical information for all settings (skills, weapons, etc)

@Core book.  It does have only rule book, the Keepers Guide. 

Right now there are basically two models  for RPG books. 

1) The game has a core rule book and then puts out a "players book" that has CharGen from the core book, setting descriptions and material listing with a section of player advice with 98% of the material coming from the core book.  CoC 7th and Conan are examples.

2) The game is deliberately broken into 2 or 3 books, all of which are needed to run the game, while only one is needed to play a character. D&D and C&C are examples.  

@Updated to new look.  I don't understand this one.  It is.

@20 default.  Well this has been the default for as long as the game has existed.  The current Keepers Guide supports 20's and Modern as it is.   I do not think including default time periods in the core is bad and to have two is better.  I do think that Chaosium has not come to the realization that the current crop of gamers mostly do not know or actually even care that there is a difference between the 20's, 30. and 40's.  Heck, most of my CoC games are set in 80's thru near future (2020's etc).  When I trot out a 70's or 80's game they treat it like ancient times and they have a hard time RPing within restrictions like needing to go to a library and use a book to research.  What?! No internet???  Given that their core players have been playing in the 20's, this editions use of 20's PLUS modern is the best I believe we will see.   Now I definitely would like to see guides for the 20's and 30's.  The War Years (late 30's to late 40's), Cold War (late 40's thru 80's), Early Modern (70's thru 90's, early computer/internet/cell access), Modern (late 90's till current, fully developed computer/internet/cell access) plus any specific "flavor" guide similar to the western guide that may come up. 

Edited by Spence

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16 hours ago, Spence said:

@Updated to new look.  I don't understand this one.  It is.

The Keeper's Rulebook and Investigator Handbook don't use the same layout template/look at later books such as Pulp Cthulhu and Doors to Darkness. I'm not saying that it's a particularly big problem, but there is a difference.

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I prefer the layout of the Rulebook and Investigator Handbook with all the little tags and whatnot as callout boxes - they give the books character.

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5 hours ago, Steve said:

The Keeper's Rulebook and Investigator Handbook don't use the same layout template/look at later books such as Pulp Cthulhu and Doors to Darkness. I'm not saying that it's a particularly big problem, but there is a difference.

Ah...

I thought they were all good.  I felt CoC 7th's layout was in keeping with dark horror and the DDT and PC layouts shifted the flavor toward those titles subjects.

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1920's - It's worth noting that HPL set most of the genre-defining fiction in this era.  For many, it's an essential part of the setting.

If you were going to pick a different era, the question becomes:  is there any single era that has as large an invested fan-base who would prefer THAT era as the default?  I'm not sure there is any good way to find that out...

It's worth looking at places like the HPLHS and efforts like their MoN Prop Set, and then look around and see if any other historical RPG/setting has inspired a similar degree of passion.  Offhand, I know of none, and find this a telling point.

YMMobviouslyV!

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I could list a bunch of changes I would like in any given new edition, but I wouldn't want to see it happen for a good while anyway. New editions are a big deal and hard work for developers. They often cause conflict in the fanbase, and they tend to bring any other book sales to a grinding halt while fans stop investing in older edition books and wait for new edition ones. There are plenty of good potential supplements still to be made for CoC7E - so lets give the game a good full cycle first before we all consider starting over again. 

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As others have suggested, I think the current "two book set" is confusing, doubly more for D&D players because for D&D the Players Handbook is the "rules" and the GM book is the fluff, where it's opposite for CoC. And I'd love to see an updated layout. 

I would not make changes to the actual system. Not that I don't want changes. I don't think it went far enough and I'd like to see redundant skill consolidation and another pass at automatic weapons, but there's still enough people who want to chuck the whole thing and go backwards that I just don't see it as being a viable option to move further forward.

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I personally love the current edition.  I love the two book system with the addition of Pulp Cthulhu.  Having a investigator book is a great idea in that a player's investment is minimal and the GM provides the rest of the books for play.  This to me adds to the mystery of the game and keeps the information where it needs to be.  Either with the GM or with the player.  Having a slightly different book with various pictures, lists, etc for a player is fantastic.  The new books production value is very high.  Much more so than older books and versions.  Great job Chaosium!

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I can see the push for a modern era take.  Lovecraft’s stories were at the time of publication set in the right now.  Cthulhu could reach out and grab you as you were walking to the newsstand.  Doyle did the same with his Sherlock Holmes stories; they were cutting edge modernity.  So having a current era campaign makes sense.

On the other hand, what is “modern” keeps shifting second by second.  Cthulhu Now, published in the 1990s, is now itself a period piece.  There is a certain charm to period pieces, and they have the advantage that the setting doesn’t drastically change before you can publish the next supplement.  Personally, I think that updating Sherlock Holmes to the 1930s or whatever the current year is hasn’t worked well.  Not sure yet about Cthulhu.

 

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