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Appendix of Round Table Knights

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1 hour ago, Khanwulf said:

So... Uther had a round table? When did this get established (KAP) and who were its members?

I do seem to recall something to the effect that this was so, in a source, and that the table was given to Leodegrance for safekeeping....

Also, where did Uther get the table from? Do we know?

--Khanwulf

Uther's Round Table was founded on the advice of Merlin, which is later explicitly connected to the Table of the Grail... It appears that Merlin enchanted it as a mechanism for creating a fellowship capable of retrieving the Grail. Why he wished to do so, besides the weight of prophesy, depends on whether Merlin's ambitions were sacred or profane.

 

Edit: here's the source, from the Estoire de Merlin: https://books.google.com/books?id=bHUWDAAAQBAJ&pg=PA391&lpg=PA391&dq="uther's+round+table"+merlin&source=bl&ots=c_dIiWy33M&sig=ACfU3U3Vsi3Y6iNSZ-ul9QImutMrvZbZnw&hl=en&sa=X&ved=2ahUKEwj_77HmtLrkAhVFSK0KHWKgAS8Q6AEwA3oECAkQAQ#v=onepage&q="uther's round table" merlin&f=false

Further Edit: One may wonder if the story of Stonehenge being Ambrosius' memorial eventually transmuted into the Round Table.

Edited by jeffjerwin

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GPC, p.9: "• What is the Round Table? The Round Table is an ancient, magical table owned by King Leodegrance of Cameliard (given him by Uther);"

This is in contrast to Wace's Roman de Brut, where the Round Table is ordered by Arthur to prevent quarrels between his barons about the best place to sit. Which is a bit silly in a way for surely it would be more prestigious to be seated close to the King away.

It is also in contrast to Robert de Boron's Merlin, in which Merlin magically creates the table for Uther. But this is a small table, an imitation of the table of the Last Supper, having 13 seats and one empty seat (Judas'), until the knight who will achieve the Grail.

By Malory, this table has swollen to seat 150 knights, which is what GPC follows.

There is no mention whatsoever about the Round Table in Book of Uther. Leodegrance is mentioned once, in the chronology appendix, year 492.

KAP 5.2, p. 10: "514: King Arthur marries Guenever and institutes the Brotherhood of the Round Table."

This, and the lack of mention of the table in Book of Uther implies that there was no formal organization around the Round Table.

I have a vague recollection that the idea was being bandied around that Uther would have gifted the Table to Leodegrance in order to win his support and vote in the Supreme Collegium. In which case, 492 might work. But it leads to a question where the table was before that? Why wasn't it being used? Of course, one possible easy solution: It is a big honking table, and even when broken down, it is still a lot of boards and chairs to be transported around Logres in Uther's progress. It could have been gathering dust in some castle somewhere, before it was gifted to Leodegrance. It is also possible that the Round Table didn't show off its magical powers for Uther (or even Leodegrance), since he was not worthy. GPC says that the names appear once Arthur names the knights who are elevated to the Round Table. Could be that since there was no formal Brotherhood before 514, no one had a set seat and hence their names didn't appear. And since it wasn't 'magical' and only rarely used, it was not a big thing during Uther's time.

La Tavola Ritonda states that there were knights of the 'Old Table' (Uther's time) and of the 'New Table' (Arthur's time), but I admit, I have had the impression that the Italian stories read like prequel fanfic at times, with Uther's court being the bastion of chivalry and having the greatest knights and heroes, some of whom live to impossible old age and joust down knights like Lancelot during the Grail Quest. Since Uther Period is supposed to be gritty and might makes right, this doesn't fit with my conception of KAP Uther Court so well, even though we have some of those proto-chivalric heroes in Book of Uther.

 

 

 

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6 hours ago, Morien said:

La Tavola Ritonda states that there were knights of the 'Old Table' (Uther's time) and of the 'New Table' (Arthur's time), but I admit, I have had the impression that the Italian stories read like prequel fanfic at times, with Uther's court being the bastion of chivalry and having the greatest knights and heroes, some of whom live to impossible old age and joust down knights like Lancelot during the Grail Quest. Since Uther Period is supposed to be gritty and might makes right, this doesn't fit with my conception of KAP Uther Court so well, even though we have some of those proto-chivalric heroes in Book of Uther.

In Wace I'm not sure that the king doesn't sit in the empty middle of the table (the boards being curved - this is the method used when Edward I and Edward III apparently resurrected the idea). There are even artistic renditions of this interpretation from the Middle Ages.

Uther's Round Table is a part of the Guiron, Meliadus and Palamedes romances, where its brutality and rough edges are a significant plot point. The Tavola Ritonda is riffing off of that.

Anyway, the Story of Merlin, the first part of the Vulgate, so a major piece of proto-Malorian canon, indeed states that Merlin made the table for Uther, and that it passed into Leodegrance's hands after Uther's death. Perhaps he was the most senior surviving knight, or maybe it last met in Carohaise for some reason before St Albans and was left there. Certainly the Guiron, Meliadus and Palamedes make clear that the 'Old Table' was still active until the twilight of Uther's reign. It is possible that the magic didn't work until Arthur gained the table. Certainly the 'names appearing' is an aspect we don't hear of with Uther's table. Since the Round Table is in part based on the Templars, and they appear in the 1120s in Western Europe, it seems appropriate that the RT becomes a full-fledged Order in Arthur's time [i.e., in the corresponding parallel century], and previously was a means of avoiding the problem of the Upper Table and Lower Table.

The Table's relationship to the Grail Table is explicit in most of the Grail Romances, so either it is centuries old (and perhaps the outer rank of the Grail Knights - compare the Grail Templars in Parsifal and the Round Grail temple in Parzival) or it was made in emulation of that table. The Grail King is specifically the true heir of Lucius, last native king of Britain, while Uther and his ancestors are Romano-British usurpers. "Bringing the Grail to Camelot" doesn't just heal the realm but hypothetically makes Arthur both Sacred King and High King. This fails, of course, but it is possible to see the Round Table as part of the accoutrements of the Grail dynasty/true king. Note, interestingly, that Welsh late medieval pedigrees and the English tradition make Igraine herself a member of the Grail dynasty (Percivale, for instance, is Arthur's cousin or nephew). Arthur would therefore have a better claim than his father, hence maybe that is why the Round Table 'activates' when he becomes its head.

Edited by jeffjerwin

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Interesting.

So either a) Merlin made the table in emulation of the smaller Grail Table as a means of drawing the Grail into the mortal world, or b) the table was acquired by Uther--perhaps from Tintagel where Igraine had it?

Or perhaps Uther instituted the table as a means of securing his reign during the transition from Ambrosius--a transition I've often thought went very smoothly, despite the failure to appoint him High King, of course.

Makes me wonder if the association with Uther's table and the Grail Table might have meant that some of Uther's knights went off to populate the Grail Court. 

 

--Khanwulf

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20 minutes ago, Khanwulf said:

Makes me wonder if the association with Uther's table and the Grail Table might have meant that some of Uther's knights went off to populate the Grail Court. 

I would say that this is unlikely*, since Uther is not really all that religious, and I doubt that most of his close knights are, either.

* There is one Lamorat de Listenois in the Guiron 'prequel' stories, who very much sounds like someone who might be connected with the Grail King's lineage... But I don't think he is mentioned in BoU.

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1 hour ago, Morien said:

here is one Lamorat de Listenois in the Guiron 'prequel' stories

Lamorat is the french spelling of Lamorak. I suppose this Lamorat de Listenois is Lamorak of wales, son of king Pellinore. His mother is the sister/niece of the Fisher King, according to all the Perceval stories. That's why in the adventure of the castle of joy, Lamorak says that he is kin to the grail king.

 

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2 minutes ago, Tizun Thane said:

I suppose this Lamorat de Listenois is Lamorak of wales, son of king Pellinore.

Can't be. This would make Lamorak, and by extension Pellinore, way too old. Now, Pellinore's brother, however... (This uncle, Sir Lamorak the Elder, was supposed to be the messenger in BoU chronology year 492, but at some point, a mistake crept in and he was named as the son of Pellinore. This is a mistake. It was supposed to be the brother of Pellinore, after whom Pellinore's famous son is named.)

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This is Lamorak or Lamorat the Elder, brother of Pellinore and namesake of his nephew. He ultimately derives from Llywarch hen, the poet and prince of Rheged (and lineal ancestor of the House of Aberffraw, the princes of Gwynedd).

He is definitely a member of the Grail family, and possibly a Grail knight. Llywarch hen bears the severed head of Urien, his kinsman, back from his fatal battle near Lindisfarne in a poem attributed to him. There's an overlap between Urien and *Brien, Brons, and with the severed head in the Grail in Peredur.

However, the Grail kingdom suffered a serious calamity after Varlon (alias Urlains - Brien/Urien's evil double) slew king Lambor, who was Pellinore and Lamorak the Elder's grandfather. I'm not sure that the kingdom could really maintain a household of knights. In Parzival, there are the Templeisen, who are the Grail Knights, but they seem to be few in number. Wagner of course represents Gornemant/Gurnemanz as one of them, and Klingsor as a failed postulant. It may be that they continue in secret.

The Queste and most other Grail romances ultimately ask the Grail knights to surrender their allegiance to Arthur. If Lamorak the Elder became a Grail knight, it would be in conflict with his homage to Uther.

 

Edit: Uther and Arthur represent worldly loyalty and the Grail represents homage to Christ. Hence while sovereignty descends from God, and the king is God's vicegerent - he is also human and inferior to God. Usually a knight serves both, but... Uther in particular is not a good Christian.

Edited by jeffjerwin

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3 hours ago, jeffjerwin said:

This is Lamorak or Lamorat the Elder, brother of Pellinore and namesake of his nephew. He ultimately derives from Llywarch hen, the poet and prince of Rheged (and lineal ancestor of the House of Aberffraw, the princes of Gwynedd).

He is definitely a member of the Grail family, and possibly a Grail knight. Llywarch hen bears the severed head of Urien, his kinsman, back from his fatal battle near Lindisfarne in a poem attributed to him. There's an overlap between Urien and *Brien, Brons, and with the severed head in the Grail in Peredur.

However, the Grail kingdom suffered a serious calamity after Varlon (alias Urlains - Brien/Urien's evil double) slew king Lambor, who was Pellinore and Lamorak the Elder's grandfather. I'm not sure that the kingdom could really maintain a household of knights. In Parzival, there are the Templeisen, who are the Grail Knights, but they seem to be few in number. Wagner of course represents Gornemant/Gurnemanz as one of them, and Klingsor as a failed postulant. It may be that they continue in secret.

The Queste and most other Grail romances ultimately ask the Grail knights to surrender their allegiance to Arthur. If Lamorak the Elder became a Grail knight, it would be in conflict with his homage to Uther.

 

Edit: Uther and Arthur represent worldly loyalty and the Grail represents homage to Christ. Hence while sovereignty descends from God, and the king is God's vicegerent - he is also human and inferior to God. Usually a knight serves both, but... Uther in particular is not a good Christian.

So.. in KAP timeline when might Varlon kill Pellinore's grandfather and shatter the strength of the Grail Kingdom?

Can we assume this kingdom is/was located in the Lake District, then? And is that kingdom partially translated into Faerie on or after Lambor's death?

Perhaps Lamorak the Elder became a Grail Knight first? Or did so after Uther died?

If Uther's Round Table was intended by Merlin (whether made by him or not) to be a representation of the Grail Table, such that it would draw the Grail into Britain and bestow spiritual sovereignty onto the king, then it may be irrelevant that Uther was such a poor Christian ruler--or on the other hand it might explain how the table was handed over for safe-keeping in anticipation of Arthur. (Whether or not Uther's close confidents knew and prepared for Arthur or not.)

 

--Khanwulf

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1 hour ago, Khanwulf said:

So.. in KAP timeline when might Varlon kill Pellinore's grandfather and shatter the strength of the Grail Kingdom?

Can we assume this kingdom is/was located in the Lake District, then? And is that kingdom partially translated into Faerie on or after Lambor's death?

Perhaps Lamorak the Elder became a Grail Knight first? Or did so after Uther died?

If Uther's Round Table was intended by Merlin (whether made by him or not) to be a representation of the Grail Table, such that it would draw the Grail into Britain and bestow spiritual sovereignty onto the king, then it may be irrelevant that Uther was such a poor Christian ruler--or on the other hand it might explain how the table was handed over for safe-keeping in anticipation of Arthur. (Whether or not Uther's close confidents knew and prepared for Arthur or not.)

 

--Khanwulf

The 'wasting' of the Grail Kingdom is described independently in several romances: at first it seems - as in Chretien - to be the result of war (possibly even started by Arthur). In the Post-Vulgate it takes on the supernatural character we see in KAP. The Varlon-Lambor war was the previous explanation, not really superseded, that seems to explain its disintegration. I think of Pellam's Grail kingdom as the mere rump of a larger and richer realm that covered much of the North before Lambor's death. Note his enemy is sometimes described as a brother or cousin, so it may be a civil war, though conversely he is also described as a convert to Christianity, which might seem to rule that out.

Having Lamorak the Elder as a bridge between the Round Table and the Grail Knights may be useful. He was killed by his friend Breunor, 'the Good Knight without Fear' in the romance of Guiron prior to the death of Uther, but not long before, according to that romance, so there may not be an opportunity for him to leave Uther and join the Grail Knights.

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On 9/6/2019 at 5:58 PM, jeffjerwin said:

The 'wasting' of the Grail Kingdom is described independently in several romances: at first it seems - as in Chretien - to be the result of war (possibly even started by Arthur). In the Post-Vulgate it takes on the supernatural character we see in KAP. The Varlon-Lambor war was the previous explanation, not really superseded, that seems to explain its disintegration. I think of Pellam's Grail kingdom as the mere rump of a larger and richer realm that covered much of the North before Lambor's death. Note his enemy is sometimes described as a brother or cousin, so it may be a civil war, though conversely he is also described as a convert to Christianity, which might seem to rule that out.

Having Lamorak the Elder as a bridge between the Round Table and the Grail Knights may be useful. He was killed by his friend Breunor, 'the Good Knight without Fear' in the romance of Guiron prior to the death of Uther, but not long before, according to that romance, so there may not be an opportunity for him to leave Uther and join the Grail Knights.

There are some interesting bits here that I don't believe were captured by Sires. (Correct me if wrong.)

So Lamorat(k) was Pellinore's cousin. Can we assume he was older? And it was Pellinore who inherited a kingdom--a fragment we can presume of the larger Grail Kingdom shattered by Varlon's treachery probably in 410-425, with subsequent civil war fragmenting everything.

I suppose Cunedda was part of this family as well, though I may be mixing historical and Arthurian characters; perhaps Pellinore or his father = Cunedda?

One thing I'd be very interested in understanding is whether it would be plausible for Pellinore to be a squire in 477, squired to perhaps an older Lamorat, himself a knight alongside friend Sir Breunor.

(I want do run some "Ambrosian Squire High School" adventures and let the PKs meet future luminaries such as Pellinore and Madoc around this time.)

 

--Khanwulf

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13 hours ago, Khanwulf said:

There are some interesting bits here that I don't believe were captured by Sires. (Correct me if wrong.)

So Lamorat(k) was Pellinore's cousin. Can we assume he was older? And it was Pellinore who inherited a kingdom--a fragment we can presume of the larger Grail Kingdom shattered by Varlon's treachery probably in 410-425, with subsequent civil war fragmenting everything.

I suppose Cunedda was part of this family as well, though I may be mixing historical and Arthurian characters; perhaps Pellinore or his father = Cunedda?

One thing I'd be very interested in understanding is whether it would be plausible for Pellinore to be a squire in 477, squired to perhaps an older Lamorat, himself a knight alongside friend Sir Breunor.

(I want do run some "Ambrosian Squire High School" adventures and let the PKs meet future luminaries such as Pellinore and Madoc around this time.)

Lamorak is Pellinore's brother. I can't say what order they were born.

Neither has any connection to Cunedda, at least according to the romances. Pellinore in Parzival (as 'Gahmuret') married the queen of 'Norgals'. Originally, she is identified as a member of the Grail Family, but since Pellinore has been made a son of the Grail King rather than a son-in-law, her ancestry would seem to have more to do with Cunedda and Gwynedd than his.

Pellinore was a young knight in the mid 480s. I suppose making him a squire in 477 isn't impossible.

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Yeah, Book of Sires did not deal with this as everyone in this section weren't as important to the Uther/Arthur arc.  If/when a regional book for Cambria comes out, I am assuming this will be attended to.

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Ok, so the sources aren't much help, and if Cambria is done as a book there will likely be a great deal of inference drawn between historical and Arthurian characters. Such is life, and thus YPMV.

This is potentially useful along these lines: https://www.timelessmyths.com/arthurian/housegrail.html

Back to the Round Table. 

If Uther's table is based on the table within the spiritual kingdom of the Grail, and the Kingdom of the Grail was at one point (early 400s) a northern powerhouse, could we presume that Uther's table was less manufactured by Merlin and more procured by him  from the remnants of said kingdom? (Merlin himself being a northern figure originally.)

In which case the Table (big "T") was made in emulation of the smaller spiritual kingdom table, which was made probably back when the Grail arrived in Britain was became occulted in its protective "kingdom".  

 

This sound... plausible?

--Khanwulf

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13 minutes ago, Khanwulf said:

In which case the Table (big "T") was made in emulation of the smaller spiritual kingdom table, which was made probably back when the Grail arrived in Britain was became occulted in its protective "kingdom".  

 

I don't understand. The creation of the RT by Merlin makes sense to me. It's a good explanation, and frankly, my players never asked any question at all, so ... why bother with a convoluted explanation about the Grail kingdom?

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On 8/20/2019 at 12:43 AM, Username said:

So does anyone have a list of the "official" Knights of the Round Table? I'm thinking about compiling a list, but wanted to check first. If I do the list, I'd like to have birth dates, death dates, and date of Round Table achievement. And, on Gareth, do any of you run through the events of when he comes and pretends to be a kitchen servant? When do you introduce him?  

 

Edit: I'll keep the latest file up here. Thanks for all of the help everyone.

Appendix of Knights of the Round Table ver. 0.75.pdf 431.99 kB · 3 downloads

This is exactly the kind of resource for greathall.chaosium.com. If you add a primary source column at the end it would be even more helpful (eg GPC p14)

either message my other self @Scotty or email david@chaosium,com

Edited by David Scott

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41 minutes ago, Tizun Thane said:

I don't understand. The creation of the RT by Merlin makes sense to me. It's a good explanation, and frankly, my players never asked any question at all, so ... why bother with a convoluted explanation about the Grail kingdom?

Only if the Grail Kingdom is represented as an actual "historical" entity in temporal Britain does it become an issue. In that case... why is Merlin off creating artifacts instead of finding existing ones? (Which is what he does otherwise.)

It's also a matter of which type of Merlin you want to portray, and how much grail history to bring in. If the Grail is going to serve as a McGuffin to highlight a spiritual quest arc and heal Arthur+Britain, then you probably won't much care who is associated with a kingdom that seems as much in Faerie as associated with a real place. (Turning Castle?)

So it's a matter of emphasis. RT by Merlin for Uther may be entirely sufficient.

 

--Khanwulf

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I think the main question is, 'does Merlin have some sort of goal in mind involving Arthur and the Grail?'

It may be irrelevant, given that he vanishes before the Grail Quest or its prologues begin, but the romances do specify that he had some definite interest in the Grail. In the Didot Perceval he comes back (or his ghost does) and advices Percivale on his quest.

The other main clues that indicate that the Round Table and the Grail are closely linked are the prophecy that the Quest can only begin when every seat is filled, and the obvious connection between the Perilous Seat and the Grail - it designates the Grail hero's place, as well as the utter unraveling of Arthur's kingdom after the Quest, as if it had served its purpose.

Merlin was a collector of magical objects, and perhaps he simply intended to fuse the Grail kingdom with the Round Table, bringing it to Camelot. If you see him as malevolent, perhaps he created the Round Table in order to secure the Grail for his private collection. He is, after all, the Son of the Devil. Or perhaps he simply foresaw that the Wasteland and the Quest would be the gravest challenge for Britain and Arthur and wished to make the king and his followers ready for it.

There are indications that some sort of plan or process was repaired by the appearance of Galahad; the Vulgate makes reference to Lancelot's former destiny to achieve the Grail, which he fails by his love affair (curiously, Vivianne and Nimue seem to encourage the affair). There are also versions of the story where Percivale and Gawaine are the Grail hero. Gawaine would represent the archetype of a dauntless hero rather than a pious Templar, but the Post-Vulgate makes his fall even more dramatic than Lancelot's. It may be noteworthy that Arthur's kingdom is the very model of a Celtic hero-band but is not very good at being a Christian state. Since it is 'designed' by Merlin, perhaps he wanted the heroic 'fight your way to the artifact' and 'bring it back gloriously' route all along. This might actually put him at odds with the Grail kingdom, and suggests the Table was an imitation, rather than a relic of the Grail realm itself. But Providence intervened...

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22 minutes ago, jeffjerwin said:

I think the main question is, 'does Merlin have some sort of goal in mind involving Arthur and the Grail?'

It may be irrelevant, given that he vanishes before the Grail Quest or its prologues begin, but the romances do specify that he had some definite interest in the Grail. In the Didot Perceval he comes back (or his ghost does) and advices Percivale on his quest.

The other main clues that indicate that the Round Table and the Grail are closely linked are the prophecy that the Quest can only begin when every seat is filled, and the obvious connection between the Perilous Seat and the Grail - it designates the Grail hero's place, as well as the utter unraveling of Arthur's kingdom after the Quest, as if it had served its purpose.

Merlin was a collector of magical objects, and perhaps he simply intended to fuse the Grail kingdom with the Round Table, bringing it to Camelot. If you see him as malevolent, perhaps he created the Round Table in order to secure the Grail for his private collection. He is, after all, the Son of the Devil. Or perhaps he simply foresaw that the Wasteland and the Quest would be the gravest challenge for Britain and Arthur and wished to make the king and his followers ready for it.

There are indications that some sort of plan or process was repaired by the appearance of Galahad; the Vulgate makes reference to Lancelot's former destiny to achieve the Grail, which he fails by his love affair (curiously, Vivianne and Nimue seem to encourage the affair). There are also versions of the story where Percivale and Gawaine are the Grail hero. Gawaine would represent the archetype of a dauntless hero rather than a pious Templar, but the Post-Vulgate makes his fall even more dramatic than Lancelot's. It may be noteworthy that Arthur's kingdom is the very model of a Celtic hero-band but is not very good at being a Christian state. Since it is 'designed' by Merlin, perhaps he wanted the heroic 'fight your way to the artifact' and 'bring it back gloriously' route all along. This might actually put him at odds with the Grail kingdom, and suggests the Table was an imitation, rather than a relic of the Grail realm itself. But Providence intervened...

Good points. My interest is 'what makes a curious and clever story' using the components here and in fidelity to the sources. 

And the Grail in its intersection with Camelot and the characters is an intriguing and incomplete mystery, not the least that it can *look* simple on its surface, but simply... isn't.

Merlin himself is a hugely conflicted character, since he does things and DOESN'T do things that leave us wondering "just which side are you on old man?" Merlin's answer would be "Britain's!" But what does that actually mean is unanswered. Then you have Merlin's betrayal by his apprentice/lover, and other associated figures who seem to work cross-purpose part of the time but not all of it. 

So anytime I see "Merlin did X" it makes me start to wonder.

In any event, back to the list of knights: looks handy! Is there a Google spreadsheet version of it out there that we could contribute to? There are quite a few knights from other books (other than GPC) missing, especially from early phases.

 

--Khanwulf

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3 hours ago, David Scott said:

This is exactly the kind of resource for greathall.chaosium.com. If you add a primary source column at the end it would be even more helpful (eg GPC p14)

either message my other self @Scotty or email david@chaosium,com

Hmm, many of the dates of birth are supposition based upon when they became Round Table knighted. The death dates are mostly solid, but some are based on when I expected them to pass based on their age and an expected longish life. Should I remove those?

The source should prioritize the GPC and other Pendragon books or anything they show up in? 

Unrelated, I saw Wade show up in Karr's Arthurian Companion. I believe I conflated him to the giant for coolness factor. I was really wondering what prompted his original appearance and high stats I gave him.

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13 hours ago, Username said:

Hmm

It's a fan resource, add some notes at the bottom explaining your choices. It doesn't have to be complete, you can even become a volunteer with a login and keep it up to date on the site.

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Here's the spreadsheet. I have made it comments only because I was afraid of random edits. If this seems to be overly cautious, I'll change it. Thanks. My goal is still 100 or so, because I want to keep plenty of space for random knights as we go along. I think reserving 50 spots for players, enemies, and allies seems reasonable. As a heads up, I have only done the GPC on here and the other content was pulled from memory, wikipedia, the King Arthur Companion, and nightbringer.se

 

https://drive.google.com/open?id=1ZuhD4aBCxQfsP-182khXSgAOhgl03kl34ofJBKNcSrM

 

@David Scott How do I sign up for the greathall?

Edited by Username
Added sources

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I was thinking of the famous list of Round Table knights in Erec and Enid (v. 1691), the oldest written source, some of them  unknown:

Before all the excellent knights, Gawain ought to benamed the first, and second Erec the son of Lac, and third Lancelot ofthe Lake. Gornemant of Gohort was fourth, and the fifth was the Handsome Coward. The sixth was the Ugly Brave, the seventh Meliant of Liz, the eighth Mauduit the Wise, and the ninth Dodinel the Wild. LetGandelu be named the tenth, for he was a goodly man. The others I shallmention without order, because the numbers bother me. Eslit was therewith Briien, and Yvain the son of Uriien. And Yvain of Loenel was there,as well as Yvain the Adulterer. Beside Yvain of Cavaliot was Garravain of Estrangot. After the Knight with the Horn was the Youth with the Golden Ring. And Tristan who never laughed sat beside Bliobleheris,and beside Brun of Piciez was his brother Gru the Sullen. The Armourers at next, who preferred war to peace. Next sat Karadués theShort-armed, a knight of good cheer; and Caveron of Robendic, and theson of King Quenedic and the Youth of Quintareus and Yder of theDolorous Mount. Gaherïet and Kay of Estraus, Amauguin and Gales theBald, Grain, Gornevain, and Carahés, and Tor the son of King Aras,Girflet the son of Do, and Taulas, who never wearied of arms: and a young man of great merit, Loholt the son of King Arthur, andSagremor the Impetuous, who should not be forgotten, nor Bedoiier the Master of the Horse, who was skilled at chess and trictrac, nor Bravaïn,nor King Lot, nor Galegantin of Wales, nor Gronosis, versed in evil, who was son of Kay the Seneschal, nor Labigodés the Courteous, nor Count Cadorcaniois, nor Letron of Prepelesant, whose manners were so  excellent, nor Breon the son of Canodan, nor the Count of Honolan whohad such a head of fine fair hair; he it was who received the King’s hornin an evil day; he never had any care for truth.

  1. Gawain
  2. Erec, son of Lac
  3. Lancelot du Lac,
  4. Gornemant of Gohort (mentor of Perceval)
  5. The Handome Coward (mentionned in a few tales)
  6. The Ugly Brave( ???)
  7. Meliant of Liz (rival of Gawain in a few tales)
  8. Mauduit  the Wise ( ???)
  9. Dodinel the Wild, son of the king of Sugales
  10. Gandelu, a « goodly man »( ???)
  11. Eslit ( ???)
  12. Brieen, probably Brian of the Isles, a bad guy in a few tales
  13. Yvain, son of Urien, the Knight with the Lion
  14. Yvain « l’Avoutre » the Adulterer, bastard son of Urien, minor hero
  15. Yvain of Loenel (aka Lyonnesse), another Yvain, minor hero
  16. Yvain of Cavaliot, another Yvain, minor hero
  17. Garravain of Estrangot (aka Strangorre), ???
  18. The Knight with the Horn, « Le chevalier au Cor », ???
  19. The Youth with the Golden Ring, « Valet au Cercle d’Or », very mysterious character. Maybe the Hero of the Golden Cercle adventure in KAP ( !)
  20. Tristan who never laughed, probably the nephew of King Mark
  21. Bliobleheris, cousin of Lancelot
  22. Brun of Piciez, maybe of the Bun family (mentionned in Book of Uther), but it sounds in french very close of Bruce sans Pitié, Bruce without pity of Malory
  23. Gru the Sullen ???, brother of Brun
  24. The Armourer, « li fevre d’armes »( ???), « who prefer war to peace »
  25. Karadués the Short-armed, a knight of good cheer, aka Caradoc Briebras, hero of the Book of Caradoc
  26. Caveron of Robendic ???, the son of King Quenedic ( ???)
  27. the Youth of Quintareus
  28. Yder of the Dolorous Mount, Yder du Mont Douloureux,  assimilated in KAP to Idres, father of king Mark
  29. Gaheriet of Estraus, minor hero, nephew of Kay of Estraus
  30. Kay of Estraus, minor hero
  31. Amauguin, ???
  32. Gales the Bald ( ???)
  33. Grain, ???
  34. Gornevain, ???
  35. Carahes, ???
  36. Tor, son of king Ares, aka Tor son of Ares the cowherder
  37. Griflet, son of Do
  38. Taulas, « who never wearied of arms », Taulas de Rougemont, rival and friend of Griflet
  39. Loholt, son of king Arthur
  40. Sagremor the Impetuous,
  41. Bedoiier the Master of Horses, « Bedoyer » is the french spelling of Bedivere
  42. Bravain ???
  43. King Lot, still alive in Chretien de Troyes stories
  44. Galegantin of Wales, minor hero
  45. Gronosis, « well versed in evil », son of Kay, not mentionned elsewhere to my knowledge
  46. Labigodés the Courteous, ???
  47. Count Cadorcaniois, ???
  48. Letron of Prepelesant, whose manners were so excellent ???
  49. Breon the son of Canodan, ???
  50. Count of Honolan who had such a head of fine fair hair ???

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The Ugly Brave is Acanor, a secondary but frequently mentioned Moorish RTK. He is also the nephew of Kay.

Carahes is a variant of Gaheris.

Yder de Mount Doloreus is not the same as Idres. He is probably a double of Yder filz Nut, a different character, with his own romance.

Malduit the Wise is a wizard knight (Malduc) in the German Lanzelet. He becomes hostile to Arthur and is slain.

Gornevain is Agravadain the Brown most likely

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