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Thalaba

Resistance Table

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The "bug" with scaling the Resistance table is that the table is centered around 10 with 5% per point of difference. Basically, a human scale.

There are ways to do this without a calculator. frgospanners table, for example, is reminencent of the one used in Timelords, an RPG that is scalable.

Basically, just set a scale, and the "degree of difference" and it will work. For example, if we used a x10 scale, and gave +5/-5% per 10 points of difference it might work for high end supers (a x5 scale might be better).

Note that scaling systems aren't perfect. With scaling you tend to loose the finer grades of distinction. For example, a 99 STR and a 105 STR end up about the same with a x10 scale.

Yet another wat to do this would be to repace the resistance table with a die roll and compare the results. For example, if we used the old demon stat chart from Elrric!/Strombringer 5 a 10 Stat would roll 2D10, a 20 roll 4D10 and so on. That would be simple, do the job, and work no matter how high the values. People could put the dice to roll next to each stat on the character sheet, eliminating the need to look up a table or do any math more complicated that adding up the dice for a total. If people wanted to they could scale it simply to reduce the number of dice being rolled. For example. instead of 100 being 20D10 it could be 2D100.

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I guess Im odd. I got a print out of the resistsnce table. And I generally use it.

Not at all - you're just like the majority of us for whom this is a non-issue.

This thread is just attempting to provide an answer those few who think the traditional Resistance Table is lacking in some way - perhaps by being 'unscalable', i.e. not useful for contests between higher-than-typical stats (such as supers might have).

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----------Terms----------

Active = declaring an action during the entities turn (wins ties).

Passive / Reactive = reacting to an action during another entities turn (looses ties).

Score = Skill, or Attribute x5

Modified Score = score +/- modifiers

Scale = modified score / 100 = (round-up).

Scale die = scale dx00, where the x is the scale (1 = d100, 2 = d200, 3 = d300 and so on).

----------Goals----------

1. Higher successful rolls winning

Leads to: New critical definition

2. Successful doubles equaling a critical

Leads to: No dividing

3. Scalability without a chart

Leads to: More than one roll if of different scales (disadvantage)

Leads to: 90 verses 50 = 61% of winning, not 90% (disadvantage, trying to fix this . . . see way below)

----------Short explanation----------

1. Modified score / 100 = (round-up) = the scale (1 = d100, 2 = d200, 3 = d300 and so on).

2. You get to roll your scale and every scale below (adjusting the score downward by 100, minimum scale 1) and take the highest successful result. The active or passive can stop rolling if contented by a roll.

3. The highest roll wins (ties go to the active)

Example 1: A scale 4 troll would roll d400, d300, d200 and d100 and take the highest successful result. The troll rolls his d400 (scale 4) and rolls a successful 311. The troll is content that he can not succeed with a higher roll and stops rolling. However if he rolled a scale 4 roll of 99, then he may want to roll scale 3, scale 2 and even scale 1 if he keeps rolling lower than his opponent. This might be faster for some.

Example 2: Illhoff uses his scale 2 sneak skill and rolls a 10 verses the guards 9. Illhoff is content with sneaking past the guard at a 9 (the storyteller approves as it speeds up play).

----------Long explanation----------

Step 1: Determine the scale. If a skill, then proceed to step 1a, else (if an attribute) proceed to step 1b.

--Step 1a Skills: [skill + modifiers] /100 (round-up) = the scale (1 = d100, 2 = d200, 3 = d300 and so on). Proceed to step 2.

--Step 1b Attributes: [Attribute + modifiers] x5 / 100 (round-up) = the scale (1 = d100, 2 = d200, 3 = d300 and so on). Proceed to step 2.

Step 2: The active and passive attempt to roll equal to or under their modified score (each progressing independently). Proceed to step 3.

Step 3: If a roll is a success, then proceed to step 6, else (if a failure) proceed to step 4.

Step 4: If the roll is a failure between 1-100, then end of procedure, else (if the failure is 101+) proceed to step 5.

Step 5: If the roll is 101+, and a failure, then reduce the scale (also adjusting the score downward by 100) and proceed to step 3.

Step 6: Comparing Scales.

--6a Same scale: Highest successful roll wins (ties go to the passive). End of procedure.

--6a Different Scales: If the winner rolled a lower scale (the hundred sided dice rolled d100, d200, d300 and so on) then the looser, than the loosing entity may reduce its scale (also adjusting the score downward by 100) and proceed to step 3, else (if the winner is of an equal or higher scale) highest successful roll wins (ties go to the passive). End of procedure.

Note: Wining verses loosing ties: I figure the active entities minimum difficulty number should be the reactive entities roll. This way a storyteller could set difficulty numbers in stay of modifiers and the system would be consistent. Example: a magic roll of 60 or more could be required to understand a complicated magical text and those without a high enough properly modified skill (research time, library, tutor, teacher) are without a chance of succeeding.

Example 1:

1. A mech with a 352 score (scale 4 or d400) verses a superhero with a 268 score (scale 3 or d300) battle it out.

2. The mech rolls a d400 (scale 4) for a roll of 355 (a failure), and then rolls a d300 (scale 3) for a roll of 211 (a success).

3. The superhero rolls a d300 (scale 3) for roll of 226.

4. Since they both succeeded on scale 3 the highest roll wins (the superhero with a successful 226 beats out the mech with a successful 211).

Example 2:

1. Ivan the strongman with a 125 score (scale 2) verses Ugburth the troll with a 350 score (scale 4).

2. Ivan the strongman with rolls a d200 (scale 2) and gets a 125 (a success).

3. Ugburth the troll rolls a d400 (scale 4) and get a 12 (a success).

4. Since Ivans d200 (scale 2) success roll (125) exceeds Ugburth’s d400 (scale 4) success roll (12) Ugburth get another roll at a the next lower scale (scale 3).

5. If Ugburth rolls under 125 again with his d300 (scale 3), then he get another shot at d200 (scale 2) and then stops because that is the scale of his competitor.

----------Doubles are critical----------

Doubles equate to a successful critical only on a successful winning roll and critical failures occur only on a failed roll (not loosing an active verses passive contest). This favors the skilled, causes a successful critical about 5% of the time and scales well (I hope).

----------Rolling Scales----------

Method 1

001-100 = d100

101-200 = d200 = d100 + d6/2-1 (round up) . . . (1-3 add 0, 4-6 add 100).

201-300 = d300 = d100 + d6/3-1 (round up). . . (1-2 add 0, 3-4 add 100, 5-6 add 200)

301-400 = d400 = d100 + d12/4-1 (round up). . . (1-3 add 0, 4-6 add 100, 7-9 add 200, 10-12 add 300)

401-500 = d500 = d100 + d10/2-1 (round up) . . . (1-2 add 0, 3-4 add 100, 5-6 add 200, 7-8 add 300, 9-10 add 500)

And so on

Method 2

d100 + [[1dh-1] x 100]

h = hundreds place of skill*

*Attribute x5 to get the hundredths place

001-100 = d100

101-200 = d200 = d100 + [[1d2-1] x 100]

201-300 = d300 = d100 + [[1d3-1] x 100]

301-400 = d400 = d100 + [[1d4-1] x 100]

401-500 = d500 = d100 + [[1d5-1] x 100]

And so on

----------Issue to Overcome----------

Home rule: 90 verses 50 = Loose 100-91 (10%), Win 90-51 (40%), 50-01 Mixed-bag (21% Win / 19% Loose) = 61% of winning

Standard: 90 verses 10 = Loose 91-100 (10%), Win 90-01 (90%) = 90% of winning

Home rule: 10 verses 90 = Loose 100-51 (50%), 50-01 Mixed-bag (26% Win / 24% Loose) = 26% of winning

Standard: 10 verses 90 = Loose 100-11 (10%), Win 10-01 (90%) = 10% of winning

----------Idea to Overcome Issue----------

Task Resolution: Success Points

To determine success points take the tens place rolled of the successful entity and subtract the tens place of the unsuccessful entity.

Home rule: 90 verses 50 = Loose 100-91 (10%), Win 90-51 (40%), 50-01 Mixed-bag (21% Win / 19% Loose) = 61% of winning

Success Points = ?

Win being a Stalemate = ?

Home rule: 10 verses 90 = Loose 100-51 (50%), 50-01 Mixed-bag (26% Win / 24% Loose) = 26% of winning

Success Points = ?

Win being a Stalemate = ?

I need to figure out how many (negative) success points would equate a Stalemate.

Edited by darkrose50

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My problem with the Resistance Table is not that it's overly complex but that it assumes an active and a passive attribute. Who gets to make the roll on the resistance table when two player characters are opposing eachother? Player one, player two or the Keeper/GM?

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My problem with the Resistance Table is not that it's overly complex but that it assumes an active and a passive attribute. Who gets to make the roll on the resistance table when two player characters are opposing eachother? Player one, player two or the Keeper/GM?

I would say that it would normally be the "player whos turn it is"; who I would assume would be the active participant in most cases. At least thats the way we did it in a long ago, very long, RQ2/3 campaign.

SDLeary

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My problem with the Resistance Table is not that it's overly complex but that it assumes an active and a passive attribute. Who gets to make the roll on the resistance table when two player characters are opposing eachother? Player one, player two or the Keeper/GM?

The resistance table assumes attacking value v defending value. If you are looking for a mechanic for a contest then I would suggest using opposed skill tests on page 173 in BRP. If they aren't using skills you can always substitute an attribute test like an effort roll or some such.

Cheers,

David

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I think the two most common methods are:

1) Declare one side as the active (often the PC if against an NPC, or else whomever initiated the contest) and have the active side roll. This resolves the contest in one roll.

2) The 'extended contest' method: Have both sides roll, if both sides succeed or both sides fail the contest is a draw and roll again next round. Repeat until one side succeeds and the other loses.

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