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Wolfdawg

Occupation points and Credit Rating

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Credit Rating  - the higher it it is, the greater your access to stuff. A high score can mean certain doors open for you automatically.

It's a useful thing and provides your character with more access to useful things. 

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9 hours ago, Wolfdawg said:

Let me Clarify. In the Occupation you have to pay Occup. points for C.R.......Why what for? What does that give, it does not say in the Ivestigator's handbook pp 68

Yes, now look at the Credit Rating description within the Skills section on p103.

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Investigators with higher credit ratings:

-Can get access to transportation methods that others can't.

-Can potentially bribe NPCs for information or their lives.

-Can pay for newspaper clipping services and other luxury items that allows them to focus their in-game efforts on other endeavors.

-Can get clues that destitute Investigators may lack, because of social connections and status.

-Can hire contacts to work for them.

-Can easily obtain materials that can make for more exciting solutions to problems.

Investigators with lower credit ratings:

-Generally have to work harder for all of the above.

Many players prefer playing characters with lower credit ratings because they like the challenge. Many players don't like playing characters with lower credit ratings because they don't like the-challenge-of-the-mundane.

If you want a mechanics-focused answer, consider this: Why should a "rich" character with all of the advantages listed above not be required to pay for it in character creation? Wouldn't everyone just choose to be rich?

My group used their wealth to gut the Chapel of Contemplation and rebuild a Sanctum Sanctorum on top of it. They now have a home base on a "place of power." That would not have been possible if they played financially-challenged characters. It made sense that if they were going to spend points in character creation on it that it was going to result in some cool benefits in game.

So, rather than assuming that a mechanic is a "penalty," it behooves all of us to spend some time thinking about what the advantages could be. 

Edited by klecser
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There are a few downsides to having a high credit rating, of course. You might not be able to "blend in" with folks with a lesser credit rating so easily, e.g. if you are trying to go "undercover". You might find that some with low credit ratings won't trust you, because you're not "one of us".

It's not all upside. Creative keepers can easily find ways to disadvantage those with high credit ratings who seem to be perhaps trying to over-use their privileges.

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3 hours ago, klecser said:

My group used their wealth to gut the Chapel of Contemplation and rebuild a Sanctum Sanctorum on top of it. They now have a home base on a "place of power." That would not have been possible if they played financially-challenged characters. It made sense that if they were going to spend points in character creation on it that it was going to result in some cool benefits in game.

 

Boy that sounds fun! I want to be in your group!

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On 11/10/2019 at 5:40 PM, Steve said:

There are a few downsides to having a high credit rating, of course. You might not be able to "blend in" with folks with a lesser credit rating so easily, e.g. if you are trying to go "undercover". You might find that some with low credit ratings won't trust you, because you're not "one of us".

It's not all upside. Creative keepers can easily find ways to disadvantage those with high credit ratings who seem to be perhaps trying to over-use their privileges.

In a detective/murder mystery setting, many authors liked well-off investigators: there was no limit on travel, hiring minions to do the 'leg work', bribes, influence with the authorities and so on. Lord Peter Wimsey, by Dorothy L. Sayers, is a prime example. However, even in this paragon of the virtue of wealth, Sayers introduced the loss of the anonymity which is useful to investigators (vide "Clouds of Witness", "Have His Carcass").

Bottom line is, the more the money you have - to divert attention or take part in anti-Cultist investigations - the more the media will watch you. Even in the 1920's, the "bright young things" had a lot of press attention, to supply the salacious stories that titillated the less well-off members of public. They may not have the photographic or computer resources our modern papparazzi or journalists have available now, but even in the 20s-30s, the "gutter press" were ever vigilant to report on the actions of the wealthy.

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In my experience, you don't get much simply because Keepers are reluctant to close off avenues of exploration simply because of money. Patrons are provided to deal with the extraordinary costs of investigating and it just doesn't take the place it might. The Trail scenario Dying of Saint Margarets has some interesting takes on their version, where its used as a class indicator and some clues will only be available to someone who's working class and others only to someone of the educated classes.

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On 11/8/2019 at 7:25 PM, Wolfdawg said:

Can someone from Chaosium Please tell me why and what for I am spending a BIG chunk of points to get???? THANKS

 

Basically you are buying wealth and money. Someone with a higher Credit Rating makes more money, lives in a better house or apartment, and can get more expensive items more easily. That said, as Numtini has pointed out, it probably won't be all that important in play as a Keeper doesn't want to have the Investigators fail to save the world simply because  no one can afford tickets to Rio.

But having the money to afford the tickets might give the investigators options that could make  certain parts of an adventure easier. For instance, being able to afford a few elephant guns, as opposed to s ome light rifles,  might help when trying to take down some large creature.

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