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Rye and/or Oats as staple crops?


Sir_Godspeed

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14 hours ago, Jeff said:

Millet is native to Fonrit and Slontos.

My very half-arsed wikipedia research suggests that in Fonrit its probably pearl millet that is the grain of Ernamola, on a cultural basis. Probably eaten as a flatbread or porridge, or made into a drink. 

I'm not sure what variety of millet grows in Slontos. 

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18 hours ago, Sir_Godspeed said:

Rye bread is quite overpowering, though very good at creating a sustained sense of fullness (I'm looking at you, wheat and rice). It does however go excellently with cured meats and fish (especially salmon or, if you can get it, trout. ). Add some radishes, asparagus, dill, and some kind of citrusy flavor, or in more temperate climes, something else sour like common sorrel. Or you can slap some herring and onion on top of it (although pickling might be out of the question for Glorantha).Or shrimp. Or goat cheese! Not too bad, if you can get your hands on these sorts of things. Might be tough for your average Loskalmi or Junoran peasant though.

23 hours ago, g33k said:

Rye bread is very strongly-flavored!  It needs food that can keep up with it.  I commend pastrami & aged Swiss (or similar) cheese, with a strong mustard (not that piss-vinegar crayon-yellow stuff).

Raw fish works great with it.

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On 11/25/2019 at 5:46 PM, Jeff said:

GENERTELAN GRAIN GODDESSES

                LAND                GODDESS       MAIN CEREAL

                Maniria**        Esrola               Einkorn Wheat

                Peloria              Pelora               Barley

Am neither an expert on Grain Goddesses nor terrestrial grains, but would make the following observations:

  • Pelora is an alternative name for Pela?
  • Esrola used to be the barley goddess; einkorn wheat can be grown in poor, dry, marginal soils and was mostly eaten boiled in whole grains or in porridge, though it can be used to make bread. In our history it was almost entirely replaced by barley. It seems an odd choice for a land and goddess as rich as Esrola? 
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3 hours ago, M Helsdon said:

Am neither an expert on Grain Goddesses nor terrestrial grains, but would make the following observations:

  • Pelora is an alternative name for Pela?
  • Esrola used to be the barley goddess; einkorn wheat can be grown in poor, dry, marginal soils and was mostly eaten boiled in whole grains or in porridge, though it can be used to make bread. In our history it was almost entirely replaced by barley. It seems an odd choice for a land and goddess as rich as Esrola? 

Yeah I always thought Peloria was named for Pela-Oria?

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3 hours ago, M Helsdon said:

Am neither an expert on Grain Goddesses nor terrestrial grains, but would make the following observations:

  • Pelora is an alternative name for Pela?

Pretty much in the same way that Esrola is the long form of Esra, the corresponding plant goddess of barley.

3 hours ago, M Helsdon said:
  • Esrola used to be the barley goddess; einkorn wheat can be grown in poor, dry, marginal soils and was mostly eaten boiled in whole grains or in porridge, though it can be used to make bread. In our history it was almost entirely replaced by barley. It seems an odd choice for a land and goddess as rich as Esrola? 

Esrolia has had millennia of cultivating Einkorn wheat, so I expect there to be cultivars closer to more modern wheats. It would still be different from Emmer or Dinkel (spelt) Wheat, and probably a lot less primitive than aboriginal einkorn.

In our planet's prehistory, einkorn wheat was selectively bred even before people started farming because only the richer grains would be carried elseplace. Wheat cultivation from those beginnings to the onset of the Bronze Age was twice than the onset of the Bronze Age to now. Egyptian wheat exports probably went to Minoan Crete already. Mediterranean Africa fed Rome and probably the Greek and Phoenician colonies before it shortly after the onset of the Iron Age.

I never saw Esrolia as a barley-exporting place, to be honest - if you ship a cereal overseas, it is usually wheat or rice (the only old transport route for rye that I have heard about was up the Norwegian coast in trade for dried cod).

Barley exports are usually in barrels, in liquid form.

Telling how it is excessive verbis

 

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On 11/26/2019 at 5:33 AM, Qizilbashwoman said:

One of the most deeply misleading things about Peloria is that it looks like Mesopotamia but honestly it's basically Russia in climate, complete with reindeer herding shamanic peoples right in the northern bits

Normally, yes, but the Lunars have trashed Winter and driven it back, to improve the climate.

In any case, you can grow a lot of crops in Russia.

They make great rye bread as well! 😀

Simon Phipp - Caldmore Chameleon - Wallowing in my elitism since 1982. Many Systems, One Family. Just a fanboy. 

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23 minutes ago, jajagappa said:

Not to mention Wisconsin, Minnesota, and the Dakotas. Wheat, rye, corn, and of course wild rice in far northern Minnesota.

All of those places have rather southerly latitudes compared to the agricutural regions of e.g. Denmark (a 10 degree difference!).

In historical times, rye was grown inland of the Lofoten, at about 70° latitude (20° north of Montreal). The harvest wasn't that productive, but sowing the grain brought it over the winter better than exposing it to mice in the storage. When the dried cod trade was a regular thing, the fisherfolk there would stop sowing the rye and just trade whatever they needed for their fish.

 

Kalikos quests:

Just now, Qizilbashwoman said:

they did, but uh that's over now

Actually, the Kalikos quest thwarted by Argrath was/is going to be organized when Sheng was/will be at large. No idea who keeps those quests going, and supplied with moonrock, but nobody is afraid of global warming in Peloria.

Telling how it is excessive verbis

 

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1 hour ago, Joerg said:

All of those places have rather southerly latitudes compared to the agricutural regions of e.g. Denmark (a 10 degree difference!).

True. But there's a reason that the area was heavily settled by Norwegians and Swedes (rather than the scattering of Danes who settled further south in more inclement climes such as Cleveland, Chicago, or Iowa) - and which I'll attest to having grown up mostly in western Wisconsin.

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