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Lloyd Dupont

(other) Life little things

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Even though I live in Australia now, I grew up and lived in France for a while. We love a lot of food over there, including mushrooms. Even more so for wild mushrooms!

What is the RPG connection you ask? 

Well you see, in my latest dark elf fantasy campaign people where kinda stranded in the world of dark elves, where the main staple food was giant bugs and mushrooms.
And even though, you know how it goes, we were just talking around a table, I couldn't get my players to agree that, at the very least, some mushroom ain't that bad.... They can't wait for their (imaginary!) character to go back home and eat "real food"! 😅🤣

Mushrooms just ain't much of a thing here in Australia!.. 😮 Oh.. and don't get me started on the possible edibility of giant bugs. I think it just didn't caught with them ether! 😛🤣

Edited by Lloyd Dupont

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I always wonder why eating crawly things with six or eight legs is regarded as icky when eating things with ten legs is regarded as a high culinary treat, whether as shrimp, lobster or other such.

For a real world lightless ecology, I would ask "where are the autotrophs, how do they use up carbon dioxide, and where does the oxygen come from?"

While there are yeasts that work anaerobic, most fungal organisms use up elementary oxygen.

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Understandable.  Australia is largely desert, not conducive to the growth of mushrooms.  While I enjoy them, I eat only domestic varieties.  Even experts occasionally die from eating the wrong wild-picked fungus.  It is sometimes hard to tell the good stuff from deadly toadstools.  Does your setting have the equivalent of truffles, and the nosey beasts needed to hunt them down?

Our ancestors must have been brave, or starving, to figure out what was edible and what wasn't.

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14 minutes ago, seneschal said:

...

Our ancestors must have been brave, or starving, to figure out what was edible and what wasn't.

They already knew.  Humans were never "aliens," trying to figure out new-planet-ecology & foodstuffs.

Ancient wandering tribes always came from an adjacent area, where some of the foods they knew (that were common where they came from) could still be found.  They could observe -- from among the new varieties -- what the local creatures could (and couldn't) eat; e.g. if a bear or a pig or a monkey could eat it, it's pretty certainly safe for a human.  Etc.

 

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🙂 I would like to see the expression on the Caveman’s face that first tried jalapeños. He must have thought he was dying!

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4 hours ago, seneschal said:

Understandable.  Australia is largely desert, not conducive to the growth of mushrooms.  While I enjoy them, I eat only domestic varieties.  Even experts occasionally die from eating the wrong wild-picked fungus.  It is sometimes hard to tell the good stuff from deadly toadstools.  Does your setting have the equivalent of truffles, and the nosey beasts needed to hunt them down?

Our ancestors must have been brave, or starving, to figure out what was edible and what wasn't.

Half my family is Russian and there wild mushrooms are considered a delicacy. Many Russians living in rural Russia know how to identify them yet I’m told (by my Russian wife) mushroom poisoning is a common thing there.

Edited by rsanford

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43 minutes ago, rsanford said:

Half my family is Russian and there wild mushrooms are considered a delicacy. Many Russians living in rural Russia know how to identify them yet I’m told (by my Russian wife) mushroom poisoning is a common thing there.

It can be incredibly difficult to tell the difference sometimes.

West-Coast USA has had a spate of deaths recently from one of the asian-immigrant communities.  One of their reliable staple mushrooms (that's safe to gather & eat) turns out to look identical to one of the varieties here that is horribly dangerous.

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On 2/28/2020 at 2:39 PM, g33k said:

e.g. if a bear or a pig or a monkey could eat it, it's pretty certainly safe for a human.

Just don't assume so by watching the squirrels! 

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