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An Entry-Level D100 Game - Legends of Adventure


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1 hour ago, Atgxtg said:

What if you just had certain spells require a minimum magic skill to learn? Cantrip type spells would have no min skill, while something like creating a ranging bonfire might require a skill of 90% or some such. That way you could have a progression, but without actual pre-reqs.

Hmm - Untrained Sorcery skill (I.e. base score) gets you cantrips (simple spells that can’t be manipulated much if at all); Sorcery skill above base but below 90 gets you “Journeyman” spells (small set of manipulations possible); Master Sorcery (90+) unlike more manipulations, and Mastery levels spells.

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1 hour ago, NickMiddleton said:

Hmm - Untrained Sorcery skill (I.e. base score) gets you cantrips (simple spells that can’t be manipulated much if at all); Sorcery skill above base but below 90 gets you “Journeyman” spells (small set of manipulations possible); Master Sorcery (90+) unlike more manipulations, and Mastery levels spells.

Yup.

BTW as for spell manipulation I could see each change requiring a magic skill roll, so the more someone fiddles with a spell the more ways it can go wrong. A master with 90% skill can get away with a couple of tweaks, but an apprentice with a skill of 25% would be lucky to get the basic spell off. Maybe toss in a free (no roll) augment at certain skill thresholds (every 25% or 50%) and extra freebies for higher success levels (one for a special success, two or three for a critical success). Perhaps something like types of magic could be covered with free tweaks when casting certain types of spells, and more tightly focused freebies might count double . An accomplished fire mage and an accomplish air mage could both use the same magic skill, but each select different freebies as their skill increased.

For instance, a journeyman caster with a skill above 50% might be able to tweak his "create fire" spell by changing the color of the flame, eliminating the smoke, or the heat or some such. Really powerful effects would be done by stacking simpler effects. For example each increase in duration or area of effect could require another casting roll. 

For failures and fumbles instead of the spell not working it could work but get augmented in the wrong way. For example a spell that lets a caster spend a short message to someone that goes wrong might send the message to the wrong person, or to multiple people. For failures this might mean a spell working but with a undesired side effect. With a fumble, things don't just go wrong, but do so in a bad way.

Edited by Atgxtg
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22 hours ago, Atgxtg said:

C7's Doctor Who RPG just has a Skill called Transports. I think there were only a dozen skills or so in that RPG. It does have traits and specialties to add more depth to it, like a character usually had to have some sort of background or trait that would explain why their transport skill would apply to a piloting a ballistic submarine, but in the end, just a dozen or so skills. 

That's interesting - do you happen to have that list of skills handy? Also, traits/specialisms would be an interesting expansion if one were to have an "Advanced" version of a "Basic" game ...

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DWAiTaS Skill list: Athletics, Medicine,  Convince,  Science, Craft, Subterfuge, Fighting, Survival, Knowledge, Technology, Marksman, Transport.

The Year Zero Engine SRD has a similar restricted skill list: Craft, Endure, Fight, Sneak, Move, Shoot, Scout, Comprehend, Survive, Manipulate, Sense Emotion, Heal - but several implementations expand that to sixteen. Again, Y0 leans heavily on traits / feats / talents to further detail characters.

 

 

Edited by NickMiddleton
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3 hours ago, Vile Traveller said:

That's interesting - do you happen to have that list of skills handy? Also, traits/specialisms would be an interesting expansion if one were to have an "Advanced" version of a "Basic" game ...

Yes I do. The list is: Athletics, Convince, Craft, Fighting, Knowledge, Marksman, Medicine, Science, Subterfuge, Survival, Technology, and Transport. Most are probably self explanatory, and I suspect, close to where you are heading. In the game, skills (and attributes) are rating on a 1-6 scale. 

As for specialization, a character with a high enough skill can pick one (or more if the skill is high enough) areas of expertise, such as fast talk, leadership,. painting, guitar, Sword, unarmed boat, history, law, bow, pistol, grant a +2 to the skill when applicable. The helps to allow a dozen skills to handle just about everything

As I noted previously the GM can sometimes apply a penalty to a skill if there are reasons to believe the character wouldn't be familiar with the specific application. For instance, a player character who is a professional race car driver might have Transports 5 with Cars as an Area of Expertise, but they probably don't know how to fly a helicopter or a spaceship. It depends on the characters skills, areas of expertise, traits, and backstory. I'd have to dig for the specific restriction.

Traits (good and Bad)are bought with the characters Story Point pool (basically a pool of points used to modify die rolls and make things happen in the game. So the better the player characters, the fewer Story Points they have for play, and vice versa) , and give modifiers that apply in specific circumstances, or give the character the ability to do things that otherwise can't be done. Since the game allow for aliens and robotic characters, the list is quite varied and includes a lot of unusual stuff. For example the Run for Your Life trait lets a character run away from something at a slightly higher speed than normal. But it doesn't apply elsewhere. More powerful traits cost more story points. 

Tasks in the game and handled by rolling 2d6 and  adding  the relevant  skill and relevant attribute (the exact combination depends on the task being attempted) and any modifiers to try and beat a difficulty number. If successful, how well the character did is determined by how much they beat the difficulty by, and conversely, on failures, how badly the character fails is determined by how much they failed by.

All in all is's a pretty solid system, if simple, and somewhat "vanilla". In someways it's like a streamlined version of Traveller. And like Traveller, the game system can easily be adapted to other settings. More easily in fact, due to it needing to cover all of time and space. One thing I like is that they ditched the Attribute and die roll modifier you see in most RPGs and just make the attribute the modifier. So someone with STR 3 adds 3 to the die roll for STR based tasks and so on.

 

Note that this sort of approach might work for your streamlined BRP.  You could add the skill score to a & attribute rating for a success chance, or you could have someone compare their roll to both their skill and their attribute score, and bump of the success level if a roll falls under both.  If you really wanted to go crazy you could ditch attribute scores and just treat them as traits that could be used to modify some skill rolls. For instance, some one with good Dexterity might get a +10% bonus to applicable skill rolls. 

I just brought the game up because it seems to be the direction you're heading towards. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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4 hours ago, NickMiddleton said:

DWAiTaS Skill list: Athletics, Medicine,  Convince,  Science, Craft, Subterfuge, Fighting, Survival, Knowledge, Technology, Marksman, Transport.

The Year Zero Engine SRD has a similar restricted skill list: Craft, Endure, Fight, Sneak, Move, Shoot, Scout, Comprehend, Survive, Manipulate, Sense Emotion, Heal - but several implementations expand that to sixteen. Again, Y0 leans heavily on traits / feats / talents to further detail characters.

The old James Bond RPG, was similar, there were 24 skills in the game, one of which was off limits to the players. Player could specialize in skills to add a bit more detail, and there were "fields of experience", non skills that might let a character do something (play golf) or know something that didn't count as skills or have ratings.

Mophdius' Star Trek also takes a similar approach, reducing skills into six "disciplines" (Command, Conn, Security, Engineering, Science, and Medicine) as uses talents and focuses a further define characters.

A short skill list helps to keep things simple, and makes it easier to have multi-talented characters who are skilled in various areas, but at the risk of being too general, and potential problems with character advancement. With only a dozen skills, it doesn't take that long to get good at everything, and that might be troublesome to running a long campaign. Bond and Trek are both geared towards ultra competent main characters, but not all settings work well that way. 

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  • 3 weeks later...
On 7/27/2020 at 4:53 PM, Atgxtg said:

C7's Doctor Who RPG just has a Skill called Transports. I think there were only a dozen skills or so in that RPG. It does have traits and specialties to add more depth to it, like a character usually had to have some sort of background or trait that would explain why their transport skill would apply to a piloting a ballistic submarine, but in the end, just a dozen or so skills. 

Doctor Who list of skills is actually very similar to mine. The following ones are close enough to be considered the same:

Athletics / Athletics
Convince / Communication
Craft / Manipulation
Subterfuge
/ Balance
Fighting / Melee

Knowledge / Education
Marksman / Aim
Transport
/ Pilot/Ride

Medicine, Science and Survival more or less cover the same fields as my "Nature".

Technology and Magic show that my list is more Fantasy and DW is more SF.

Which leaves us with Perception and Resistance.
In RD100, Resistance is covered by Survival. Is it the same here ?
I can see how Perception can be split beween Subterfuge, Survival and a few others.

Edited by Mugen
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  • 2 weeks later...

My own impulse is to make Ride and other animal-driven forms of transportation one thing (Animal Handling?) and anything about making a purely-mechanical contrivance go where you want as a separate thing.
 

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On 8/17/2020 at 12:05 PM, Mugen said:

Doctor Who list of skills is actually very similar to mine. The following ones are close enough to be considered the same:

THat's not all that surprising considering the nature of RPGs. Core concepts and skills tend to be similar across most RPGs, with only the level of abstraction game mechanics varying. 

 

On 8/17/2020 at 12:05 PM, Mugen said:

Medicine, Science and Survival more or less cover the same fields as my "Nature".

Mostly. If you think about it both Medicine and Survival are really just "narrow focus" aspects of the Science skill. I think the main reason why they are three sperate skills in DW is to prevent Science from being (more of) a superskill.

On 8/17/2020 at 12:05 PM, Mugen said:

Technology and Magic show that my list is more Fantasy and DW is more SF.

Yup. The series has generally portrayed magic as some sort of technology or psionic ability.

On 8/17/2020 at 12:05 PM, Mugen said:

Which leaves us with Perception and Resistance.
In RD100, Resistance is covered by Survival. Is it the same here ?

Not necessarily. In general any task would be a roll of 2D6 plus an attribute and/or a skill and any special trait modifiers. Damage is handled similar to in Traveller, with the damage coming off of attributes.

Where it gets tricky is that, since DW covers a lot of ground and has aliens, robots and all sorts of exotic lifeforms, it's possible for a character to have some sort of special trait that can alter the situation significantly. A robot probably doesn't need to breath or worry much about be exposed to cold temperatures. Selling the GM on any unusual character concepts is importnat, as many of the more powerful traits require GM approval and a good backstory. 

On 8/17/2020 at 12:05 PM, Mugen said:


I can see how Perception can be split beween Subterfuge, Survival and a few others.

Awareness is an attribute in DW, along with Coordination, Ingenuity, Presence, Resolve and Strength. Most Perception tasks would probably add Awareness to the die roll, although which skill to add would depend on what the character is supposed to notice. For instance, if someone was suppose to notice that a car was left in "Reverse" instead of "Park", they might add their Awareness and Transport skill. If trying to locate a wound on an unconscious patient they might add their Awareness and their Medicine skill.

One of the ideas behind the game was not to tie skills to a particular attribute to allow for more flexibility in determining what combinations to use, depending on the task. 

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