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GAZZA

Another up vote for Six Seasons in Sartar

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I finally got around to reading it. To put this in perspective, I'd been informed that SSoS had a useful "summary method" of running RQG NPCs rather than have to use full stat blocks for all of them - and that alone was the main reason I purchased it.

Ironically I'd say that was actually the weakest part. Oh don't get me wrong, those rules are there, and they're useful... but they're not (IMHO) substantially time saving over a full stat block anyway. If you were looking for something that, for example, meant you didn't have to track location hit points for Random Broo #3, you won't find that here.

But you should absolutely buy it anyway.

I can think of no higher praise for the campaign within than to note this: I wish I hadn't started my existing RQG game, so that I could instead have my players experience this campaign instead. And one way or the other I will find a way to make that happen - whether by having them make alternate PCs, or by adapting the scenarios somehow to serve the existing PCs (who are from varied backgrounds and will be in their mid 20s by the time of the events, so this isn't necessarily straightforward).

This is a tour de force, and the standard by which all other RQG supplements should be judged. Kudos to the authors, and to anyone who has yet to check this out, do yourself a favour and grab a copy for yourself, you won't regret it.

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I have yet to deep dive into it but I have the exact same impressions. Man it looks good!

As a side note, I am really impressed by what is published under the Jonstown Compendium banner from a quantity and quality standpoint. But SSoS may have set the bar.

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I have a whole pile of Jonstown stuff on my DTRPG wish list that are just waiting for my birthday in a couple of months; if SSoS is a decent example of the quality I'll be very pleased indeed.

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9 hours ago, GAZZA said:

I finally got around to reading it. To put this in perspective, I'd been informed that SSoS had a useful "summary method" of running RQG NPCs rather than have to use full stat blocks for all of them - and that alone was the main reason I purchased it.

Ironically I'd say that was actually the weakest part. Oh don't get me wrong, those rules are there, and they're useful... but they're not (IMHO) substantially time saving over a full stat block anyway. If you were looking for something that, for example, meant you didn't have to track location hit points for Random Broo #3, you won't find that here.

Not too surprised, as this is challenging. I would still love NPC stats in well-produced book form or as part of a book... as I’ve mentioned, I know... 😉 Just watched a video by Dungeon Dudes on youtube about how they use NPC stat blocks, which pretty much simulates my own use in 5e. A tad trickier in RQ, but the more I think about, the more I feel it is pretty much as easy to use and replace stats in RQ as in 5e. In 5e it is so darn good they have all the NPC stat blocks at the end of the books, easy to find (never to be underestimated as GM). All right, didn’t really come in here to discuss that but it is a recurring concern with many (solutions vary).

I am planning to get the POD version of Six Seasons in Sartar (any date?), hopefully in hardback (?) so stands wear and tear, and one of Smoking Ruins and Pegasus Plateau. Love the integration of myth as truer representation of psychology/conscience which I suspect is what Andrew is going for. That's where RQ/Glorantha uniquely has higher potential to rise to another level than most games.

I know they are very different in build and format, but which one of the other two  (Smoking or Pegasus?) do you prefer in terms of quality of adventures and storytelling? Role-playing and mood is more important than battle for my players. Which book made you more excited to run stuff as a GM?

The video below. I would love to have NPC:s that are also primarily there for social interactions and other activities also.

 

Edited by Fred

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17 hours ago, GAZZA said:

I'd been informed that SSoS had a useful "summary method" of running RQG NPCs rather than have to use full stat blocks for all of them

It wasn't really a stand out for me either but I really liked that each Runes had a specific personality trait attached to it. It really gives texture to the characters.

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15 hours ago, Fred said:

I know they are very different in build and format, but which one of the other two  (Smoking or Pegasus?) do you prefer in terms of quality of adventures and storytelling? Role-playing and mood is more important than battle for my players. Which book made you more excited to run stuff as a GM?

This is the first of them I've bought and read. There are however several places that the other Jonstown stuff have been reviewed; off hand I don't have the link, but it should be on the recent activity page.

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47 minutes ago, GAZZA said:
15 hours ago, Fred said:

I know they are very different in build and format, but which one of the other two  (Smoking or Pegasus?) do you prefer in terms of quality of adventures and storytelling? Role-playing and mood is more important than battle for my players. Which book made you more excited to run stuff as a GM?

This is the first of them I've bought and read.

Quick nota bene, Six Seasons in Sartar and other Jonstown stuff isn't official Chaosium stuff; TSR and TPP aren't part of the Jonstown Compendium. :)

As for Fred's question, I much prefer TPP over TSR. The adventurers feel much more at the center of the action, to me. The title adventure of TSR is perhaps the most interesting story published thus far, but I feel the adventurers are more along for the ride, than making active choices.

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1 minute ago, Crel said:

Quick nota bene, Six Seasons in Sartar and other Jonstown stuff isn't official Chaosium stuff; TSR and TPP aren't part of the Jonstown Compendium. :)

As for Fred's question, I much prefer TPP over TSR. The adventurers feel much more at the center of the action, to me. The title adventure of TSR is perhaps the most interesting story published thus far, but I feel the adventurers are more along for the ride, than making active choices.

Ah, yes, thank you for the correction. Regardless I haven't read (or purchased) either; my own campaign is set in 1616 so I've more or less given most of the RQG stuff a miss so far as essentially "not particularly relevant for my current time period". SSoS was an exception because I'd heard it had some useful stuff in it to steal; I was quite surprised to find that the actual campaign setting itself was so good.

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1 hour ago, GAZZA said:

Ah, yes, thank you for the correction.

No worries, the mistake's not rare.

I will note that many of the new adventures do seem to me like they'd fit fine in older time periods, at least if you're in Sartar. The new material's less supportive if you're in Prax (though there is some stuff).

Anyway, hope you're enjoying your campaign!

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3 minutes ago, Crel said:

No worries, the mistake's not rare.

I will note that many of the new adventures do seem to me like they'd fit fine in older time periods, at least if you're in Sartar. The new material's less supportive if you're in Prax (though there is some stuff).

Anyway, hope you're enjoying your campaign!

Seems to be going OK, but yeah - I'm in Prax for the most part. However I am intending to get all of the newer stuff - it's just a priorities situation (and honestly I want more of the supplements for RQG than I want more adventures, at the moment).

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7 hours ago, Crel said:

As for Fred's question, I much prefer TPP over TSR. The adventurers feel much more at the center of the action, to me. The title adventure of TSR is perhaps the most interesting story published thus far, but I feel the adventurers are more along for the ride, than making active choices.

Yes, because the world of Glorantha is so rich, this would be an easy trap to fall into when creating any story in this world. Make the protagonist active with a strong intention, preferably with consequences of his inner world on failure. How do you create that attachment in adventures? How do one make players truly care about the story? Mostly this is done through the relationships between the players in RPG:s would probably be my experience. Or attachment to truly colorful NPC:s. The easy way to createvemotion is to use humor, but if we want to go deeper, we need to consider those questions more as we create adventures. I believe this is not done nearly enough.
I am leaning towards TPP but was intrigued when I saw the Zorak Zoran temple on a map in TSR. Then again, I have bought well published adventures before where the motivation for players is unclear and it is always hard to engage enough as a GM to strengthen it, so most of those remain unplayed. I saw an old video when they spoke of RQ and one of Jeff or Jason told (them) he had cried at the ending on an adventure in TPP (or  was it TSR?).

Edited by Fred

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