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On 12/23/2020 at 10:03 AM, RogerDee said:

This underlies some of the importance of communication to be honest.

Or the great idea above is having one as a simultion.

Have them as different universes, working under different laws.

That sort of depends on just how those settings work, especially so if they are multiverses. 

Ultimately there is ususally a need for some sort of overlying universal law that holds sway over the laws of a particular universe. 

 

For example, one idea I played with was to combine the Amber setting with that of Moorcock's multiverse and White Wolf's Word of Darkness/New World of Darkness settings. The idea was that the Amberites were the Lords of Law, and the Courts of Chaos represented the Lords of Chaos, It mixed rather well, but just by lining the two it gave the Lords Of Law another level of meaning, and lead to some interesting alterations to both multiverses.

WoD/NWoD were a lot easier to integrate. Since WoD has the Umbra (Latin for Shadow) as something of a land between worlds it fit in well with the Amberites. My idea was to have a mage in NWoD who came from the original WoD and got brought to the NWoD setting by Merlin. It was really done as a sort of roundabout eplaination for why the character throught and acted in OWoD terms instead of NWoD terms- and also to show that there was a "deeper" meaning to things beyond the WoD setting. For instance, in that campaign Paradox was not really the subconscious will of the "sleepers" but instead the parameters for that shadow as consciously or unconsciously set by the Amberites.

On 12/23/2020 at 10:03 AM, RogerDee said:

Perhaps Runequest is part of the Realm of Dreams, connected to the Dreamlands? Grand Grimoire includes such an idea.

The main thing is indulge your creativity, ensure everyone has fun!

Yes, but sometimes one can come at the expense of the other. Players might not approve or or like just how a GM mixes and matches the settings, with one typically lessening the other. For instance if a GM were to mix, say James Bond, with Godzilla, the end result would probably be at the expense of the Bond setting. 

Often, to ensure everyone has fun, it's best not to indulge your creativity.

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On 12/27/2020 at 8:50 AM, Vile Traveller said:

I'm sure you didn't mean that to come out the way it sounds. 🤣

I dunno, I typed it, I didn't say it.😊

What I meant was that not every creative impulse we have should necessarily be followed. Sometimes something that seems like a cool idea isn't, or it actually makes things worse. Mixing and matching settings and characters can be great, but it isn't necessarily so. Much as with any other story/gaming idea it tends to come down to how it's all done. The GM can't just sit back a rely upon the novelty of the crossover to do the work for them. 

I've seen more than one campaign get messed up or even come to a premature end because a GM didn't really think through the repercussions of some "creative impulse". I've been guilty of it myself on more than one occasion.  Now I try to think thins through before I try anything radical, and will usually have some sort of "Plan B" in the wings to salvage the situation should my latest "stroke of sheer genius" not pan out the way I had originally expected. 

With crossovers it fairly easy to bring in something that completely outclasses the norm for a given setting and winds up relegating the PCs to spectators. Porting Cthulhu over to an Stormbringer campaign is great, until you have to figure out what, if anything, the players can do about it, or what the effects will be if they can do something about it.

 

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44 minutes ago, Atgxtg said:

winds up relegating the PCs to spectators

This is what draws the line between a good game idea and a good story for me. The crux of the session should be player choice, and the consequences that come from it.

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On 12/29/2020 at 1:45 PM, hix said:

This is what draws the line between a good game idea and a good story for me. The crux of the session should be player choice, and the consequences that come from it.

I agree. The players should usually feel that their characters can do things that will have an impact on the course of events. If not, then there isn't much reason for them to play the game. 

Now this can be a small impact, especially if the campaign is mostly small scale events such as personal vendettas, local problems and criminals and such, but big multiversal crossover stories sort of drive the story towards large scale events. A GM usually can't set of a big multiversal story full of powerful entities and then run n adventure about finding a specific brand of chocolates for somebody's significant other for Valentine's Day. 

So if the stories have to "go big", so do the PCs. Pretty much all of the Eternal Champion stories deal with a main protagonist who would very much prefer to do the small scale, mundane stuff, but who is forced by events into becoming a major player on the big stage. 

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On 12/26/2020 at 1:43 AM, Atgxtg said:

For example, one idea I played with was to combine the Amber setting with that of Moorcock's multiverse and White Wolf's Word of Darkness/New World of Darkness settings. The idea was that the Amberites were the Lords of Law, and the Courts of Chaos represented the Lords of Chaos, It mixed rather well, but just by lining the two it gave the Lords Of Law another level of meaning, and lead to some interesting alterations to both multiverses.

WoD/NWoD were a lot easier to integrate. Since WoD has the Umbra (Latin for Shadow) as something of a land between worlds it fit in well with the Amberites. My idea was to have a mage in NWoD who came from the original WoD and got brought to the NWoD setting by Merlin. It was really done as a sort of roundabout eplaination for why the character throught and acted in OWoD terms instead of NWoD terms- and also to show that there was a "deeper" meaning to things beyond the WoD setting. For instance, in that campaign Paradox was not really the subconscious will of the "sleepers" but instead the parameters for that shadow as consciously or unconsciously set by the Amberites.

This sounds pretty fun actually. I have certainly found that with Amber / Lords of Gossamer, that the game is very Magic the Gathering in nature, such that the players are travelling the multiverse seeking fun, fame, profit -and of course power (unlimited POWA!). So having them use both swords and a phaser works quite well as the laws of physics change in each adventure.

Currently toying with combining M&M and LoG stuff to create a Supers across the multiverse type game at some point.

On 12/26/2020 at 1:43 AM, Atgxtg said:

Often, to ensure everyone has fun, it's best not to indulge your creativity.

On 12/29/2020 at 5:53 PM, Atgxtg said:

I've seen more than one campaign get messed up or even come to a premature end because a GM didn't really think through the repercussions of some "creative impulse".

i think you absolutely should indulge creativity, but in your second comment you are right about understanding implications - but that is mainly down to the players likes and dislikes. At the end of the day roleplay is all about having a jigsaw, and then putting things together in fun and interesting ways.

It is all about PLAY, being the ultimate name of the game.

 

 

 

 

 

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On 1/13/2021 at 7:29 AM, RogerDee said:

This sounds pretty fun actually. I have certainly found that with Amber / Lords of Gossamer, that the game is very Magic the Gathering in nature, such that the players are travelling the multiverse seeking fun, fame, profit -and of course power (unlimited POWA!). So having them use both swords and a phaser works quite well as the laws of physics change in each adventure.

Currently toying with combining M&M and LoG stuff to create a Supers across the multiverse type game at some point.

It can be fun, but there is no guarantee that it will be. Often GMs get so caught in in how great ti would be to do a crossover that they lose sight of how it will play out. I've seen more than one good campaign run into problems when a crossover turned out not to be such a great idea after all. 

 

On 1/13/2021 at 7:29 AM, RogerDee said:

i think you absolutely should indulge creativity, but in your second comment you are right about understanding implications - but that is mainly down to the players likes and dislikes. At the end of the day roleplay is all about having a jigsaw, and then putting things together in fun and interesting ways.

It probably at least as much down to how well the GM can pull it off. I've seen the same concept, even the same adventure, done by different GMs and getting completely different results. 

On 1/13/2021 at 7:29 AM, RogerDee said:

It is all about PLAY, being the ultimate name of the game.

Yeah, in the end it's all just a game we play to have fun. Somethings things work out great, sometimes they don't. It's just that at lot of the "big story" stuff has the potential to derail a campaign. That's why when I set up something that could be a game breaker (not just a total part kill, but something that could destroy the campaign) I try to have some sort of backup plan to correct things. Usually two or three such plans. That way if my "fantastic idea" turns sour I have a way to recover before the situation is too far gone. It's one of the perks of making GMing mistakes - you get to learn from them. 

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On 11/28/2020 at 2:04 PM, RogerDee said:

Has anyone tried combining all the D100 universes into a multiverse complete with lore?

Such that things like CoC, Mythras, Aquelarre etc could be incorporated?

Discuss how you would accomplish this.

 

The MRQ II Elric of Menibone setting has the Moonbeam Roads for certain adepts to wander from universe to universe, and I've had Jhary a Conel turn up in Blackmoor and Pherae (an island setting in Open Quest).  So this is easily adapted to any fantasy style BRP setting. In the book The Dreamthief's Daughter Elric visits the Earth during WWII to dispatch some Nazi aircraft using his dragon, so fantasy characters finding themselves in more modern universes seems an interesting option. I'm currently running Open Quest and Classic fantasy so I'm toying with PC from The Company fighting an evil high priest from Classic Fantasy and his orc horde.  I'm contemplating putting superheroes in the Classic Fantasy Blackmoor setting too to see how crazy things could get. 🤪

Edited by Conrad
Voilodion Ghagnasdiak distracted me.
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4 hours ago, sladethesniper said:

Hmmm, so...I am lazy.  I just converted Rifts to BRP and borrowed the Palladium megaverse and just added other stuff to that.

That sounds pathetic :(

-STS

Not pathetic at all! Sounds fun to me... though I have only a passing familiarity with Rifts, based on its initial rulebook.
It appeals to me a lot more than something like Torg, where the different impinging realities didn't seem to mix that well. Rifts, in its chaos, seems more cohesive, somehow. Which is what I'd want out of a game multiverse... variety, but not a feeling that I was shifting to a whole different game. A Stormbringer multiverse feels different from a Luther Arkwright multiverse from a Runequest multiverse... at some point you need to pick a rail and ride it.

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21 hours ago, sladethesniper said:

Hmmm, so...I am lazy.  I just converted Rifts to BRP and borrowed the Palladium megaverse and just added other stuff to that.

That sounds pathetic :(

Fortunately I can read without having to sound it out then.;)

More seriously, there is nothing wrong with adapting stuff from other settings and RPGs. Every GM does it to some extent, and even professional writers borrow good ideas and adapt existing stories. Most people didn't think that adapting Romeo & Juliet to modern day New YorK City made West Side Story sound pathetic, so why should you be embarrassed? It's not like you got Russ Tamblin and a bunch of dancers prancing around in the middle of a city street while pretending to be a tough NYC street gang.

Uh-oh, I hope I didn't just spoil the next adventure.😳

But they were the most pathetic looking street gang I've ever seen in a movie, and it was based on Shakespeare. They made Sha Na Na and the guys from Grease look tough. All of us suburban kids though, "We could take those guys-and why aren't they getting run over by cars dancing on a city street?"

 

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