Jump to content

Paladin vs. Pendragon: Manors, phases, campaign


Recommended Posts

My players are more interested in Charlemagne, than they are in Arthurian lore. This is why I'm trying Paladin. I like it so far it it gives a realistic Western Medieval feeling with the church and patron saints. Anyway my question is about manor and land of players. Unlike Pendragon (where we roll for manors in Salisbury) there is none in Paladin. Or I couldn't see the same. It says that our players' current home is of their liege lord. On the other hand if they roll 1/d20 their father becomes lord, but still no further rolls about manors. On Winter Phase section it says "IF the knights have land" so unlike Pendragon, they might be landless knights?

I really didn't get phases part either. It seems like the past rolls of where you learn the story of your (grand)father but again in some inventory rolls it states that use that armour in phase 1 etc. So it also seems like grand campaign of Pendragon. I'm really at lost in Paladin. Also does anyone know some cheat sheets for Paladin?

Link to post
Share on other sites
4 hours ago, RexHiemis said:

I really didn't get phases part either. It seems like the past rolls of where you learn the story of your (grand)father but again in some inventory rolls it states that use that armour in phase 1 etc. So it also seems like grand campaign of Pendragon. I'm really at lost in Paladin. Also does anyone know some cheat sheets for Paladin?

See Chapter 15. It is similar to how GPC is divided into Periods, telescoping the technological advancement into Arthur's/Charlemagne's reign, with the knights potentially going from chainmail hauberks to full plate during their lifetimes.

4 hours ago, RexHiemis said:

so unlike Pendragon, they might be landless knights?

From what I understand, they start as squires, and are knighted* once they have been aged and trained to qualify for the knighthood. Unlike in Pendragon, the manors in Paladin are not automatically inherited, and indeed, are usually given only for the life of the knight so honored. So even if the father would be landed or even a lord, it may not be automatic; also note that in the lord case, the birth order is 1d6, so you are unlikely to be the eldest anyway. Although the Franks tended to split the lands amongst the sons, anyway; case in point Charlemagne and his brother, or Charlemagne's sons (only one survived him, so no split after all), or his grandsons (three way split).

* Actually, if you run the introductory scenarios, the Player-characters start as squires and remain squires until the middle of the second adventure, when they are knighted. While I didn't see with a cursory glance if they would get a household knight position, it would probably be easiest to assume yes, although it depends what adventures the GM wishes to throw their way and what the players want, too.

Edited by Morien
  • Thanks 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
11 hours ago, 7dot62mm said:

I stole the patron saints system and transplanted it in my Pendragon campaign 🙂 Also some other systems 🙂

I've considered doing the same, though for me it would need some substantial alteration in the particular saints used (the Britons of the 5th century wouldn't be using the same list of saints as the Franks in the 8th, after all, especially since some of those saints haven't even been born yet!).

You could even make equivalents for other religions pretty easily; patron deities for pagans (Celtic or Saxon), and patron spirits for Heathens (mostly animals, but maybe you could add some plants).

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
13 hours ago, 7dot62mm said:

I stole the patron saints system and transplanted it in my Pendragon campaign 🙂 Also some other systems 🙂

I thought the same, using the Celtic pantheon for pagans and saints for Christians. If I can finish it I will gladly share it in here.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
50 minutes ago, RexHiemis said:

I thought the same, using the Celtic pantheon for pagans and saints for Christians. If I can finish it I will gladly share it in here.

Having looked at this a little for my game - at least with regard to modeling period religion - I'm wondering whether a historic or mythic view of the saints would be best here. For example, St. George would be quite iconic for Pendragon, and he had already been martyred at the time... but he wasn't associated with chivalry, or the dragon, or England. 

Either way, I'd be interested in seeing it!

Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

×
×
  • Create New...