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seneschal

[Superworld] Build These Heroes Contest

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We've all seen similar scenarios in the comics or on assorted animated series: the hero of our favorite superhero title is confronted by a group of opponents whose members were given their abilities and are sponsored by a corporate entity. However, the largest private employer in the world isn't Stark Enterprises, Star Labs or Lexcorp. It's Walmart, rural dime store chain grown into a global phenomenon. It had to happen and today it has; as part of its exclusive promotion deal of the upcoming Man of Steel movie, Walmart has named its official superhero team (drawn and scripted by DC Comics!). Each of these metahumans is based on a real employee.

A Look at 2013 / June cover of Walmart World magazine

From left to right, they are:

Ninja -- loss prevention specialist skilled at fading into the background to detect shoplifters (how she does that in a slinky catsuit must involve the use of her powers)

Fire Man -- emergency response and rescue expert; sometimes carries a fire extinguisher on his back

The Giver -- encourages volunteerism and charitable giving in the face of natural and national disasters

Path-Maker -- career guidance manager; his flowing cape billows about him dramatically whether there is a noticeable wind or not

OK, here's the contest. Pick a character. Stat him or her up using the Big Gold Book and/or Superworld or Worlds of Wonder. Include a description of the character's powers, outlook, and origin. The winner gets a Marvel Comics-style No Prize. ;)

BTW, a fifth member of the team (not pictured on the cover) is Shirley Shrinkage, Walmart's first superhero, who gained her powers in 1986 after encountering a barrel of radioactive waste. Also a loss prevention specialist, she's an energetic, thin, middle-aged woman with long, wavy blonde hair. Her red leotard is offset by blue headband, cape, gloves, shorts, and boots with wide cuffs.

Edited by seneschal
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Wow, who knew Walmart had a magazine? Where do I get it? I'd rather read about those characters than anything D.C. is doing these days.

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Yes, I need to work these "heroes" into my Superworld campaign. Probably some scenario where they are competing with the player's heroes, but include a film crew and lots of posing and pro Walmart speeches. With work, I may not have any time for stats until this weekend.

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Yes, I need to work these "heroes" into my Superworld campaign. Probably some scenario where they are competing with the player's heroes, but include a film crew and lots of posing and pro Walmart speeches. With work, I may not have any time for stats until this weekend.

Don't forget to have them make new hires sit through an anti-union video as part of orientation.

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I know I will add one more "hero" to the list:

Kid Kart

A young man pushing around a Walmart shopping cart, filled to the brim with stuff. Amazingly, Kid Kart can pull out whatever item he wants from this cart, he just needs to dig around a bit. He has no chance of sneaking up on anyone though, as at least one wheel has a flat spot and the whole thing rattles loudly. He also needs a "drive" roll to control it at speeds higher than a fast walk due to a bad front wheel. :)

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How about the obligatory older, oversized woman riding a motorized scooter with an oxygen tank on the back and a minicart full of Doritos, Hostess, and Dreyers products?

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I know I will add one more "hero" to the list:

Kid Kart

A young man pushing around a Walmart shopping cart, filled to the brim with stuff. Amazingly, Kid Kart can pull out whatever item he wants from this cart, he just needs to dig around a bit. He has no chance of sneaking up on anyone though, as at least one wheel has a flat spot and the whole thing rattles loudly. He also needs a "drive" roll to control it at speeds higher than a fast walk due to a bad front wheel. :)

He's not canon, but I like the concept. As a graveyard shift cashier at Walmart, I can confirm that one of those returns carts could contain anything, ANYTHING! Bruce Campbell ("Shop smart. Shop S-Mart!") should be so lucky. On the other hand, while I know BRP has a Drive skill, can its Powers set simulate a utility belt or bag of many things gimmick that can produce almost any useful item in a timely manner?

Also, as a loyal employee, I take umbrage, Sir, at your putting the word heroes in quotation marks. Can you doubt that these selfless associates are anything but pure of heart?

On the other hand, I can totally see Corporate Security as a high-tech entity along the lines of SHIELD, VIPER, or the competing organizations from G.I. Joe. After all, they've got a global jurisdiction to protect (and I bet you many if not most Walmart-owned stores have a Justice League/Star Trek variety teleportation bay hidden in some locked room).

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How about the obligatory older, oversized woman riding a motorized scooter with an oxygen tank on the back and a minicart full of Doritos, Hostess, and Dreyers products?

Sadly Hostess is no more, and Dreyer's is only available to us left-coasters.

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The lack of Hostess is a real problem, since it removes important weapons from a superhero's arsenal.

Hostess Comic Book Ads

or

https://www.google.com/search?q=hostess+superhero+ads&client=firefox-a&hs=9fW&rls=org.mozilla:en-US:official&tbm=isch&tbo=u&source=univ&sa=X&ei=5e3KUYvwNoL09gSFmICoAQ&ved=0CDsQsAQ&biw=1280&bih=861

We've gotten lots of comments so far but no write-ups. I've had some ideas of my own, but real life has a way of getting in the way of good gaming. Here's what I've got so far.

Path-Maker

Market Manager Kelly Young, Kansas City, MO, had developed a reputation for recognizing, mentoring and developing potential leaders. However, he had no idea what he was getting into when he agreed to oversee Walmart Corporation’s new Associate Enhancement Program. MORE

Young was already an avid boxer. The AEP increased his strength enough for him to lift (but not throw) an automobile. His punches carry the force of an elephant gun blast, enough to knock through a brick or concrete wall. He’s more durable, too, slightly tougher than a suit of plate armor, with equivalent protection against heat and electricity. Young’s signature ability, “path making,” allows him to teleport himself and two 200-pound companions up to 1,000 yards. The process takes a lot out of him. He can teleport more often when it is just himself.

STR 50

CON 15

SIZ 14

INT 16

POW 10

DEX 15

APP 11

Move: 10

Hit Points: 15 (29 SIZ + CON option)

Damage Bonus: +3D6

Armor: 9 (Kinetic, Heat, Electrical)

Attacks: Brawl 25%, D3+3D6; Grapple 25%, D3+3D6

Skills: Bargain 5%, Climb 00%, Command 5%, Dodge 00%, Insight 5%, Jump 00%, Knowledge (Human Resources) 5%, Language (English) 80%, Martial Arts (Boxing) 00%, Perform (Oratory) 0%, Persuade 15%, Research 25%, Status 15%, Teach 10%

Powers:

Armor 9 (Kinetic, Heat, Electrical), 27 power points

Enhanced Characteristic, 36 power points, +36 Strength (total 50)

Extra Energy, 8 power points, +80 (total 90)

Teleport, 30 levels, 30 power points per use, can move approximately 600 pounds up to 1,000 yards

Failings:

Responsible to Walmart +3 (frequent, significant involvement)

Dependent, superhero trainees (frequent significant involvement) +3

Notes:

The name “Path-Maker” just said “Teleport” or “Dimensional Travel” to me, and the BGB didn’t have the latter. Skills are from the Teacher profession. Has 95 initial power points based on characteristics, plus 6 more for Failings (total 101). Has 500 professional skill points plus 160 personal skill points (total 660).

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Yeah, sorry I never got back to this. I decided to convert over our Superworld campaign to use the Supers! RPG. My time has been spent time converting over the characters and writing up a short adventure for a test of the system.

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Yeah, sorry I never got back to this. I decided to convert over our Superworld campaign to use the Supers! RPG. My time has been spent time converting over the characters and writing up a short adventure for a test of the system.

Abandoning Superworld for something "new school" and rules light? Heresy! No yummy Hostess Fruit Pies (oops, or the generic equivalent by Mrs. Baird or Little Debbie) for you! X(

;D

Well, you've raised a crop of eager new role-players via BRP. Once you get a few sessions of Supers! under your belt, you'll have to let us know what you and your players think. A side-by-side comparison of one of the character write-ups would be fun, too.

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At the very basic level, Supers! is about rolling however many six-sided dice you get versus however many your opponent has. The details behind that matter of course. It very much encourages players to be creative with their attacks/defenses. You can only use any given power ONCE per round. It is almost odd that you usually only get ONE attack per round anyway, but numbers matter a lot then. I'm already thinking of using a house-rule where you go (everyone rolls based on their REACTION rating) twice per round, once at full REACTION number and then at half that.

Bullfrog, the big green brute leaps out of the nearby pond to attack the newly arrived Firefly. He could use his Fighting (fists) at 4D6, but in this case the GM declares he will roll versus his Super Leap at 5D. Firefly could use her Flight 3D to defend, or her FORTITUDE of 3D, or rely on her REACTION of 4D6. OR maybe even her Size Change at 4D if the player can explain why it would work under these circumstances.

Supers! also scales up very quickly and you can have characters throwing around cars even at Super Strength 3-4D levels.

I am probably just in the mood to change things up, and this looks like it could be fun. I'd want BRP for the more "serious" RPG stuff though. For that matter, we may not like it after all and back we go to the comfort of Superworld. :)

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One of the quickest ways to learn about a system is to look at the character sheet, right? Right. For this quick Supers! adventure, I have a couple aliens as villains. One of these is Space-Cat. He should look familiar, as I copied the character sketch right out of the Ringworld book. :) Only my wife might actually recognize him as a Kzinti. Though I will play him as a refugee, turned reluctant mercenary just looking for a way off this primitive planet.

Our printer/scanner seems to be faltering, but here is a Supers! character sheet for Space-Cat. You might notice the closest thing to stats are the four Resistances. Aptitudes are skills sets. Ads and Disads are your basic advantages/disadvantages. Powers can be modified by Boosts or Complications.

For example, with his space rifle I will have him shoot one big plasma blast, or a "shotgun" blast of smaller particles that can hit two targets at a time (Area Effect boost). As a weapon that can be broken or taken away it gets the Device Complication.

The standard hero is built on 20 dice, and Space-Cat came out right at that (I won't even explain the math, except to say Resistances and Aptitudes start at 1D).

The Compentency Pool consists of extra dice that can be pulled out to add to some roll. Only one at a time. Space-Cat can also reroll once per game session with his Dumb Luck Ad.

There are no "critical" hits or "fumbles" to speak of, though I've read of some using a "wild die" (get a "6" keep rolling, get a "1" you roll and subtract) if you are rolling at least 2 dice.

Space-Cat_zps80479dd4.jpg

Edited by ORtrail

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Okay, a bit of free time and I wanted to at least throw out some stats for "Kid Kart". Here is the Superworld version:

Kid Kart

A glorified stock boy, Simon Jackson is always found pushing a Walmart cart around. It is filled to capacity with what appears to be cheap junk. However, Simon has the ability to pull out whatever item he needs (as long as it could fit in a shopping cart). Simon is tall and lanky, 18 years old but could pass for 16 easily.

STR 12

CON 15

SIZ 13

INT 11

POW 10

DEX 16

APP 12

Move: 10

Hit Points: 15 (28 SIZ + CON option)

Damage Bonus:

Armor: 5 (Kinetic, Heat, Electrical)

Attacks: Brawl 35%, D3; Grapple 25%, D3

Skills: Bargain 5%, Baseball Bat 75%, Climb 25%, Command 5%, Dodge 00%, Firearm 75%, Insight 5%, Jump 00%, Knowledge (stocking) 5%, Language (English) 70%, Martial Arts (Karate) 75%, Perform (Oratory) 0%, Persuade 15%, Status 15%

Powers:

Armor 5 (Kinetic, Heat, Electrical)

Device: Shopping cart used as power focus. Must get weapons/items from carts. Anything from the cart can only be used by Simon and has up to a 3D6 effect.

Failings:

Responsible to Walmart +3 (frequent, significant involvement)

Notes:

No direct power to cover the cart with Superworld.

In comparison, for Supers! "Kid Kart" would stat up like this:

Kid Kart

Resistances

Composure 2D

Fortitude 2D

Reaction 3D

Will 2D

Aptitudes (or Skills in Superworld)

Awareness 1D (Perception skill added to Supers!)

Commerce

-Inventory 2D (Simon knows what/where/how much of every item in the store)

Fighting

-Karate 3D

Shooting

-Firearms 3D

Streetwise 2D (Simon knows the neighborhood and the regular shoppers)

Technology 2D

-Security System (Simon knows the Walmart security system)

Vehicles -cart 2D (Simon could use this skill for offense or defense in combat or to escape)

ADS and DISADS (the advantages and disadvantages)

I Brought This Along x3 (meant to cover things like Batman’s Utility Belt, the hero can pull out a tool, item, or device as needed, once per adventure, but Simon can do this up to three times per adventure)

Dependent (Simon must answer to Walmart management/corporate)

Poor (Simon live paycheck to paycheck)

Device (a full shopping cart where he gets his Armor/Super Weaponry from)

POWERS

Armor 3D (Simon has a throwback blue vest that somehow protects him from harm)

Healing 2D (Simon can heal damage with items from his cart)

Super Weaponry 3D (any weapon Simon pulls from the cart is at this level)

Edited by ORtrail
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;D

In Champions, Simon Jackson's shopping buggy would be a Cosmic Power Pool, with the Obvious Accessible Focus Limitation, i.e., his powers are physical objects (store products) pulled from his returns basket, and the Advantage No END Cost, because he doesn't have to expend personal effort to use the prepackaged stuff.

In TOON, it would be a Bag of Many Things, able to produce almost anything as long as Jackson made his Schtick roll. On the other hand, in TOON, a blown roll isn't necessarily bad. It would mean that Simon pulled out something totally unexpected, but not necessarily useless.

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Not related to the Walmart heroes, but ...

Wonder Woman 1974

I admit up front that Linda Carter owned the role of DC’s Wonder Woman. However, one year before the iconic television series debuted, another network (there were only three then) aired a pilot superheroine movie that got decent ratings but was not pursued. Cathy Lee Crosby played the title role. As a teenager, I agreed with the film’s many critics that this wasn’t the Wonder Woman I was familiar with from the comics. Crosby was blonde, her character wasn’t strong enough to shove aside cars and stop tanks, and her star-spangled costume (while absolutely more practical) in no way resembled Diana’s form-fitting swimsuit, er, uniform.

Having re-watched the 1974 Wonder Woman twice as an adult, however, I’m having second thoughts. I wish Crosby’s version had had a chance to develop. Her proto-Wonder Woman, while possessing no obvious powers, was far more super than she might at first appear. Diana Prince still had the secret Amazonian origin, golden belt, bracelets, and invisible plane. She still worked as secretary/special agent for Steve Trevor, head of an unnamed U.S. intelligence agency. She could still slap around a group of thugs without breaking a sweat. She still stuck to her Amazonian principles while surrounded by a male-dominated culture. And her depiction was based on the Wonder Woman comics of the late 1960s and early ‘70s, in which the character lost her powers and had to rely on fighting skill alone. In that regard, Crosby, a former tennis champion, made sense. She looked fit and athletic, even when wearing dresses that accentuated her curves.

Carter’s Wonder Woman kicked butt. Crosby’s version didn’t often have to because she was always three to five steps ahead of everyone around her, bad guys or good. She knew what people were going to say before they said it and often anticipated what they were going to do before they did it. Carter’s heroine could deflect bullets with her magic bracelets. Crosby’s would determine where the villains would likely place a sniper and clobber him from behind before he could ever fire a shot. Carter’s Wonder Woman could smash her way out of deathtraps, since the bad guys always underestimated her powers. Crosby’s Wonder Woman, utterly unflappable, could think her way out of a deathtrap in mere minutes. Carter’s version would leap 15 feet into the air to avoid an onrushing automobile, then during its second pass would grab its rear bumper as she landed. Crosby’s iteration would leap 8 to 10 feet into the dubious safety of a shop awning to avoid a careening auto, then slap a tracking device on its roof during its second pass. (Note to villains: If you miss her the first time, just keep going.)

There were other differences. Carter’s Wonder Woman scrupulously kept her secret identity, even when the series shifted its setting from the Forties to the Seventies in its second season. The identity of Crosby’s heroine was a sort of open secret, known to Steve Trevor and to the bad guys (who, for once, figured it out). Carter’s character seemed afraid to use her direct might against opponents, choosing to toss them or lasso them instead. Crosby’s had no compunctions about delivering savage jabs, kicks and chops to her foes, taking them down fast and hard. Other than the ability to deflect bullets, Carter’s series paid only lip service to her exotic warrior heritage. Crosby’s heroine was able to snatch a hurtling spear out of the air and send it back at its thrower. Carter’s Wonder Woman defeated many foes but rarely had a recurring villain. The 1974 teleplay set the title character up with an archrival – an outlawed Amazon who fled to man’s world seeking fame and (ill-gotten) fortune, a sort of anti-Wonder Woman. Carter projected intense earnestness. Crosby seemed to be quietly laughing at all the male idiots surrounding her. Carter wore the traditional tiara, leotard, and high-heel boots. Crosby, not needing to conceal am alternate identity, wore current fashions but usually red, white, blue, or a combination of the three. In the field she wore a red, white, and blue long-sleeved, waist-length tunic, long blue pants, and sturdy blue boots with sensible heels.

Powers and Abilities

Crosby’s Wonder Woman had outrageous intuition and superb physical skills. No one could lay a glove on her in hand-to-hand combat. She was an expert with a spear, both as a handheld and a thrown weapon. Wonder Woman’s golden belt concealed a long reel of tough cord. Her bracelets were multi-function gadgets, serving as grapnel, tracking device and sensor, and a timed explosive.

STR 17

CON 17

SIZ 11

INT 21

POW 17

DEX 18

APP 16

Move: 10

Hit Points: 14 (28 CON + SIZ option)

Damage Bonus: +1D4

Armor: None

Attacks: Brawl 53%, 1D3 + DB; Grapple 53%, 1D3 + DB; Spear 43%, 1D6+1 + 1/2 DB; Quarterstaff 53%, 1D8 + DB

Skills: Bargain 47%, Climb 58%, Dodge 64%, Drive (Motorcycle) 48%, Fast Talk 33%, Hide 38%, Insight 46%, Jump 53%, Listen 53%, Martial Arts (Amazonian Combat Technique) 50%, Parry 43%/53%, Pilot (Invisible Plane) 29%, Research 53%, Sense 48%, Spot 53%, Stealth 45%, Swim 53%, Throw 53%, Track 45%

Powers:

Bracelet Explosive – Energy Projection (Kinetic) 3d6 damage, one use per day, 3 power points (20 points); Special – Doesn’t require Projection skill but must be physically placed at desired detonation site

Bracelet Tracer – Super Skill, Tracking +60% (6 points)

Defense, -75% vs. all incoming attacks (15 points)

Extra Energy, +20 power points, total 37 (2 points)

Golden Girdle Grapnel – Wall Walking, one power point per combat round (10 points)

Super Skills – Insight +40% (4 points); Spear +40% (4 points) and Parry with Spear +20% (2 points)

Unarmed Combat, 3 levels, +6 points damage for Brawl and Grapple, -15% chance to be hit, +15% to Brawl and Grapple, +6 Armor during successful unarmed Parry, (60 points)

Failings:

Accountable to a U.S. intelligence agency, often, +3 power points

Personal enemy, Ahnjayla, renegade Amazon, +2 power points

Notes:

Wonder Woman had 118 character points for powers based on stats plus 5 more for failings, total 123; 500 skill points plus 210 personal skill points based on INT. Profession: Spy.

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This thread is so close to an idea I had for a BRP superpowers monograph, I'm now afraid that if I wrote it up, I would get sued for plagiarism.

And I don't want to get sued by Wal-Mart. They have extremely deep pockets.

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This thread is so close to an idea I had for a BRP superpowers monograph, I'm now afraid that if I wrote it up, I would get sued for plagiarism.

And I don't want to get sued by Wal-Mart. They have extremely deep pockets.

Aw, don't let an article honoring employees who'd performed community service discourage you. Wal-Mart's house organ depicted the honorees in costume but no powers or origins were described. We're awash in BRP fantasy and horror material. We desperately need your superhero monograph. ;)

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Ever since reading the Justice League Antarctica comic (a one-shot or maybe it was a couple issues?) I have had a fondness for B or C level super hero teams. Played a Mutants & Masterminds game at DragonCon where the GM had a group of minor heroes we got to pick from, and the ultimate villain was the Noid.

Great change of pace from "normal" heroes. If you had an idea for a monograph along those lines, I'd love to play it.

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Aw, what the heck, it's not a radically original idea, and it will probably take me another ten years to get this into a publishable monograph, so if anyone wants to steal this idea, be my guest...

Superhero Temp Agency

It's the year 2080. Nanotechnology, genetic engineering, body modification, artificial intelligence, materials science, and computer-human interfaces have made superpowers available to almost anyone. The catch? All these technologies are owned by corporations and governments. You've been given superpowers by Transtech Industries Ltd., and you now owe the company US$50 million. You can start paying off your debt immediately.

Your first assignment is to appear at a mall opening. You'll be signing autographs and handing out coupons. We would also like you to provide security in the unlikely event of an attack by disgruntled, superpowered former Transtech employees. You might also watch out for terrorists from Free Cleveland, the Caliphate of North Africa, and Red Tomorrow. Microfusion, which has recently been losing market share to Transtech, may also try to disrupt the event in some way. And while this is extremely unlikely, there's a remote possibility that one of our megastore AIs has become self-aware and will try to kill everyone there.

Please do not manhandle the protesters. Yes, there will be a small-ish group of protesters. When you applied for the transhuman upgrade, it was right there in the fine print--all the regular humans hate you now.

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Not related to the Walmart heroes, but ...

Wonder Woman 1974

I admit up front that Linda Carter owned the role of DC’s Wonder Woman. However, one year before the iconic television series debuted, another network (there were only three then) aired a pilot superheroine movie that got decent ratings but was not pursued. Cathy Lee Crosby played the title role. As a teenager, I agreed with the film’s many critics that this wasn’t the Wonder Woman I was familiar with from the comics. Crosby was blonde, her character wasn’t strong enough to shove aside cars and stop tanks, and her star-spangled costume (while absolutely more practical) in no way resembled Diana’s form-fitting swimsuit, er, uniform.

Having re-watched the 1974 Wonder Woman twice as an adult, however, I’m having second thoughts. I wish Crosby’s version had had a chance to develop. Her proto-Wonder Woman, while possessing no obvious powers, was far more super than she might at first appear. Diana Prince still had the secret Amazonian origin, golden belt, bracelets, and invisible plane. She still worked as secretary/special agent for Steve Trevor, head of an unnamed U.S. intelligence agency. She could still slap around a group of thugs without breaking a sweat. She still stuck to her Amazonian principles while surrounded by a male-dominated culture. And her depiction was based on the Wonder Woman comics of the late 1960s and early ‘70s, in which the character lost her powers and had to rely on fighting skill alone. In that regard, Crosby, a former tennis champion, made sense. She looked fit and athletic, even when wearing dresses that accentuated her curves.

Carter’s Wonder Woman kicked butt. Crosby’s version didn’t often have to because she was always three to five steps ahead of everyone around her, bad guys or good. She knew what people were going to say before they said it and often anticipated what they were going to do before they did it. Carter’s heroine could deflect bullets with her magic bracelets. Crosby’s would determine where the villains would likely place a sniper and clobber him from behind before he could ever fire a shot. Carter’s Wonder Woman could smash her way out of deathtraps, since the bad guys always underestimated her powers. Crosby’s Wonder Woman, utterly unflappable, could think her way out of a deathtrap in mere minutes. Carter’s version would leap 15 feet into the air to avoid an onrushing automobile, then during its second pass would grab its rear bumper as she landed. Crosby’s iteration would leap 8 to 10 feet into the dubious safety of a shop awning to avoid a careening auto, then slap a tracking device on its roof during its second pass. (Note to villains: If you miss her the first time, just keep going.)

There were other differences. Carter’s Wonder Woman scrupulously kept her secret identity, even when the series shifted its setting from the Forties to the Seventies in its second season. The identity of Crosby’s heroine was a sort of open secret, known to Steve Trevor and to the bad guys (who, for once, figured it out). Carter’s character seemed afraid to use her direct might against opponents, choosing to toss them or lasso them instead. Crosby’s had no compunctions about delivering savage jabs, kicks and chops to her foes, taking them down fast and hard. Other than the ability to deflect bullets, Carter’s series paid only lip service to her exotic warrior heritage. Crosby’s heroine was able to snatch a hurtling spear out of the air and send it back at its thrower. Carter’s Wonder Woman defeated many foes but rarely had a recurring villain. The 1974 teleplay set the title character up with an archrival – an outlawed Amazon who fled to man’s world seeking fame and (ill-gotten) fortune, a sort of anti-Wonder Woman. Carter projected intense earnestness. Crosby seemed to be quietly laughing at all the male idiots surrounding her. Carter wore the traditional tiara, leotard, and high-heel boots. Crosby, not needing to conceal am alternate identity, wore current fashions but usually red, white, blue, or a combination of the three. In the field she wore a red, white, and blue long-sleeved, waist-length tunic, long blue pants, and sturdy blue boots with sensible heels.

Powers and Abilities

Crosby’s Wonder Woman had outrageous intuition and superb physical skills. No one could lay a glove on her in hand-to-hand combat. She was an expert with a spear, both as a handheld and a thrown weapon. Wonder Woman’s golden belt concealed a long reel of tough cord. Her bracelets were multi-function gadgets, serving as grapnel, tracking device and sensor, and a timed explosive.

STR 17

CON 17

SIZ 11

INT 21

POW 17

DEX 18

APP 16

Move: 10

Hit Points: 14 (28 CON + SIZ option)

Damage Bonus: +1D4

Armor: None

Attacks: Brawl 53%, 1D3 + DB; Grapple 53%, 1D3 + DB; Spear 43%, 1D6+1 + 1/2 DB; Quarterstaff 53%, 1D8 + DB

Skills: Bargain 47%, Climb 58%, Dodge 64%, Drive (Motorcycle) 48%, Fast Talk 33%, Hide 38%, Insight 46%, Jump 53%, Listen 53%, Martial Arts (Amazonian Combat Technique) 50%, Parry 43%/53%, Pilot (Invisible Plane) 29%, Research 53%, Sense 48%, Spot 53%, Stealth 45%, Swim 53%, Throw 53%, Track 45%

Powers:

Bracelet Explosive – Energy Projection (Kinetic) 3d6 damage, one use per day, 3 power points (20 points); Special – Doesn’t require Projection skill but must be physically placed at desired detonation site

Bracelet Tracer – Super Skill, Tracking +60% (6 points)

Defense, -75% vs. all incoming attacks (15 points)

Extra Energy, +20 power points, total 37 (2 points)

Golden Girdle Grapnel – Wall Walking, one power point per combat round (10 points)

Super Skills – Insight +40% (4 points); Spear +40% (4 points) and Parry with Spear +20% (2 points)

Unarmed Combat, 3 levels, +6 points damage for Brawl and Grapple, -15% chance to be hit, +15% to Brawl and Grapple, +6 Armor during successful unarmed Parry, (60 points)

Failings:

Accountable to a U.S. intelligence agency, often, +3 power points

Personal enemy, Ahnjayla, renegade Amazon, +2 power points

Notes:

Wonder Woman had 118 character points for powers based on stats plus 5 more for failings, total 123; 500 skill points plus 210 personal skill points based on INT. Profession: Spy.

The question is: why even call this character Wonder Woman?

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The question is: why even call this character Wonder Woman?

My understanding is that the network got permission to make a Wonder Woman movie but wasn't allowed to use the character's usual costume. Why? Dunno. Also, as stated in the write-up, the depiction was based on the de-powered Diana Prince of the late '60s and early '70s, in which Wonder Woman took up with a kung-fu master and re-learned hand-to-hand combat after her sister Amazons and their magic island vanished from the Earth. (The island came back about a year later, and so did Wonder Woman's powers and costume.) I remember reading some of those issues as a small kid, with Diana running around in a dress instead of a costume, delivering karate chops and carrying a gun.

Still, it was a fun write-up to do. Figuring out how to portray Wonder Woman's gadgets in BRP terms was a challenge. And I felt that her skills weren't good enough before I added the Super Skills power.

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