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Why another BRP fork?

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I think BRP is strong, modular, generic system which potential has not been fully used. I think BRP lacks specific games/settings. There is CoC, MW and new Vampire game on the horizon.

Also there are many subsystems like OQ, RQ6 which have their specific rules.

Because the elegance of d100 system, it can be very modular and there are quite many material that can be combined to work together. But often this brings more work for the GM and players.

Now as I see, AEON engine seems to be another generic toolkit that is based on d100 system, similarly to the great Gold Book. Am I mistaken? I don't see the need for this. I'd rather see fully supported gameline with simple BRP core mechanics. We lack d100 clones for  dnd, cuberpunk, star trek, star wars, vampire, etc.

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BRP golden book, RQ6, deluxe OP2 are all good systems, but big and chunky. This one sounds like it will be simpler, more a kin to the old BRP games. I for one like to see new iterations of d100 rules to see if there are new rule variants I could adopt, it sort of keeps the d100 systems "alive". It also gives publishers more licensing options, as all these systems are pretty much compatible. 

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It allows publishers to produce supplements for their own version of D100 rather than being restricted to games controlled by a few companies.

 

 

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Sorry for the slow reply, but Triff and Simon seem to have hit the nail on the head already!

A:e was originally inspired by the idea behind Worlds of Wonder, to provide a multi-genre system in as small a package as possible. And the reason I need A:e is so that we can have a base for producing AEON:splinter™ (science fiction), and AEON:incantation™ (fantasy) without the uncertainty and lack of control entailed by publishing under a licence, as well as allowing us to write exactly the game we want to write rather than trying to make it fit into another system. Alephtar's Revolution D100 looks great (I'm backing it), but it's not quite what I'm going for with A:e, and there are already a lot of games planned for it. Chaosium is an unknown quantity at this point, at least until they get out from under the CoC7 disaster, and - again - RQ6 is also a very different beast to A:e. In physical terms, A:e is unlikely to be a single book but will most likely comprise a series of booklets of modular sub-systems that referees can pick and choose to suit their campaign, e.g. equipment design (incl. vehicles and spacecraft), world building, magic, psionics, etc.

So, as we have to write both A:e and A:c (AEON:core™) on the way to that goal, it only makes sense to allow those to be used independently for referees that prefer to create their own settings or just want to find some elements to incorporate into their other D100 games.

There is, of course, no limit to what you could do with a D100 system as a base. I've used RQ2/3 for adventures based on Greyhawk, Mystara, Aliens, Blade Runner, Middle Earth, Mythago Wood, A Plague of Demons, Cthulhu Mythos, Biggles, Desmond Bagley, Time Tunnel, Domitian Rome, WWII, The Belgariad, Traveller 3rd Imperium, Near Future STL, Top Secret, Aftermath!, and a few others not on the top of my head at this moment. However, I'm just a guy with a co-writer so we need to spend our time wisely and pick our projects where our interests lie, or nothing will get done at all. I'd love to do a cyberpunk game (after all, I live in a cyberpunk city), but time is in short supply so that will have to go to the end of the queue. What I'd really like to do is AEON:xabungle™, whether licensed or cloned. ^_^

Star Trek and vampires hold little attraction for me, so I'll leave those to others. There's already a Star Wars clone, but it's a secret. As for a D100 D&D clone, I believe threedeesix's Classic Fantasy should fill that niche very nicely indeed.

Hope that answers your questions. :)

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I for one like to see new iterations of d100 rules to see if there are new rule variants I could adopt

It allows publishers to produce supplements for their own

   it only makes sense to allow those to be used independently for referees that prefer to create their own settings or just want to find some elements to incorporate into their other D100 games


Ok, having just read here in the forums about the big new take on BRP, it seems Chaosium is doing quite same thing. Will see if I like it, but here is what I think is a good gaming product:

All the RPG lines that are doing successfully, that people are actually playing, are open-and-play oriented. Not make-your-own-thing. You call CoC7 disaster (I agree, I'm happy I did not go with the KS), but it's still the flagship of d100 and that's because it is done. You don't have to pick and choose - just read a scenario and play.

I think we need more such lines in BRP system, but it seems that Chaosium under new leadership is going to do exactly that. Hopefully the license to use the system will be easily open for third party developers.

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From the information at hand, Choasium will be publishing the core BRP build in BRP Essentials. This will be heavily influenced by the MRQ D100 SRD build of BRP, so it will be very consistent with RQ6, although stripped back and possibly simplified.

I guess it will be weird that CoC7E won't be using this core build, so not sure how that will play out, especially as it is a flagship setting.

I think all the other BRP games will thrive akin to a cottage market, some built from MRQ D100 SRD and some from BRP BGB. Looking at what happened with the D&D OSR then this is not necessarily a bad thing for fans. However D&D has always had a dramatically larger fan base, so I guess time will tell whether this proliferation of BRP games will work or not.

From the average player's perspective, the core Characteristics look the same and you still roll a percentile dice for skills, and that's about all there is to it. The rest is genre specific, and they all tend to feel roughly the same in game play. It's only us GMs who really have the build preferences at the end of the day

Edited by Mankcam

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I guess I could be a little clearer about the target here. A:e is a toolkit, but it's production is almost incidental. Our prime goal is to produce AEON:splinter™, which is a hard science fiction, non-FTL setting in a quintuple star system. On the way to writing that - given that we are not interested in using another published system under licence -  we first have to create the basic system (AEON:core™), followed by mode advanced rules modules (collectively making up AEON:engine™).

A:e also differs from many toolkits in that the modules are relatively big and entirely self-contained, instead of being sub-system options within the main rules. For example, if you want to build your own spacecraft, you get the equipment design module. If you're not a gearhead, don't bother and get the equipment catalogue module instead. Another advantage of this modularity is that you don't necessarily need to play A:e to be able to use individual modules - most of them should plug relatively easily into other D100 games.

This will be heavily influenced by the MRQ D100 SRD build of BRP, so it will be very consistent with RQ6, although stripped back and possibly simplified.

I should reiterate that A:e isn't an OGL game and it is not based on my D100II SRD - and if it was it would come out more like RQ2 than RQ6. ;)

A:e is written from the ground up, with only the core idea of keeping common terms of reference as found in typical stat blocks. That way adventure material and rules modules will be easily transferable between systems with little or no conversion work.

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I should reiterate that A:e isn't an OGL game and it is not based on my D100II SRD - and if it was it would come out more like RQ2 than RQ6. ;)

I was actually talking about BRP Essentials being influenced from the MRQ D100 SRD, thus aiming for consistency with RQ6; it wasn't a reference to AEON.

However I did also incorrectly assume that AEON was going to be influenced from the Chaosium RQ2 rules and set in a scifi genre instead, so thanks for clearing that up, it sounds like it is certainly going to be its own beast.

Good luck with it  :D

Edited by Mankcam

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It allows publishers to produce supplements for their own version of D100 rather than being restricted to games controlled by a few companies.

 

 

Doesn't GORE do that as well? Not that I have any issues with a proliferation of D100 stuff... particularly since I'm feeling a bit uninspired by the path Chaosium has chosen to take.

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Not exactly, because GORE is OGL which still makes publishers rely on that rather restrictive licence. Same goes for my own D100II SRD. It's simpler and easier just to go with your own original rules, which can be as compatible as you like with other systems (and you can legally say so, something that the OGL specifically forbids).

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