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Hudson & Brand: Inquiry Agents of the Obscure


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As of this writing, it looks to have hit ALL the defined Stretch Goals (the first 4) -- they need to figure out the details of the next ones (levels are posted, but no rewards); at the rate this is going, they may need several more levels, beyond what they originally envisioned ... 

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I'd rather they manage to keep things deliverable than go crazy with stretch goals.

Stretch goals can be the derailment of schedules.

Keep the extra money as profit or as a purse to finance a new kickstarter later on.

Or even discount a small sum off existing backers.

Edited by groovyclam
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3 hours ago, groovyclam said:

I'd rather they manage to keep things deliverable than go crazy with stretch goals.

Stretch goals can be the derailment of schedules.

Keep the extra money as profit or as a purse to finance a new kickstarter later on.

Or even discount a small sum off existing backers.

My hope is they're already prepared and just awaiting announcement.  If not, then the last option would be very nice.

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On 9/27/2016 at 6:31 PM, Mankcam said:

Cool, I just backed it at Hardcover Book + PDFs level

Looks great

With the announcement of the new cartography stretch goal unlocked, I upped my pledge from a black and white book to a color book.  Really nothing else will do with what Stygian Fox is planning.

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13 hours ago, BigJackBrass said:

Rather unclear from the Kickstarter whether the supplement is written for 6th or 7th edition, but this has now been asked by a backer and officially answered: despite it being for Gaslight it's written with 7th edition rules. 

I don't know if anything is going to be produced anymore for 1-6e. 

 

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37 minutes ago, Mysterioso said:

I don't know if anything is going to be produced anymore for 1-6e. 

 

Presumably not, aside from fan publications. It's annoying but hardly a major problem; and it would be unreasonable to expect older editions to be catered for. 

The confusion came from the supplement being described as for Gaslight, which I believe is a 6th edition book. I think it would have been helpful to have stated the edition clearly, as obviously I'm not the only person who wasn't sure. 

As it is I'm on the fence, but might spring for the PDF. 

Edited by BigJackBrass
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1 hour ago, Mankcam said:

Wasn't Gaslight flagged to be updated for CoC 7E at some stage? I think I read that somewhere...

It would be nice if it was.  The release right before the upheaval of 7e was unfortunate as it once again made CbG the era that was behind the curve of other eras.  I guess CI is in that situation too. But CI has Oscar Rios consistently putting out new content for it so CI gets a lot more attention than CbG.  I'm truly hoping that Hudson and Brand will similarly raise interest again in CbG.

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That's unfortunate. It really should be a fully fledged set of setting rules like Pulp Cthulhu, with similar hardcover production standards.

The Victorian Era is one of my favourite, and recent film & television productions like Sherlock Holmes and Penny Dreadful have popularised it once again.

It's a relatively good time to push all things Victoriana, so I think Cthulhu By Gaslight would be very well received now.

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Unfortunately while it's one of my favourite periods too the American demographic doesn't buy it. AFAIR one of 'new' Chaosium team mentioned this and so until that changes I can't see a full Gaslight product for 7e. A peak time tv show set in the period from Amazon or Netflix might change that but I really doubt it. The 'Victorian' period for US gamers is Billy the Kid or the Gunfight at the OK Corral rather than Gaslight Boston, NYC or Paris or London.

Edited by nclarke
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1 hour ago, nclarke said:

Unfortunately while it's one of my favourite periods too the American demographic doesn't buy it. AFAIR one of 'new' Chaosium team mentioned this and so until that changes I can't see a full Gaslight product for 7e. A peak time tv show set in the period from Amazon or Netflix might change that but I really doubt it. The 'Victorian' period for US gamers is Billy the Kid or the Gunfight at the OK Corral rather than Gaslight Boston, NYC or Paris or London.

Penny Dreadful and Ripper Street do have their US fan bases as do the fairly recent Sherlock Holmes films. CbG done at the same level as Pulp Cthulhu could easily tap into that.

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I could see a Gaslight Boston, New York, or Paris. However the 'Wild West' could be presented almost as another genre set in the same time frame. The same would go from where I'm from in Australia. The Victorian Gaslight flavour would only hold sway in games set in Sydney or Melbourne, with the rest of the the country presented as a Late Colonial genre, similar to the American 'Wild West' in many ways.

Edited by Mankcam
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While I enjoy things like Ripper Street and Penny Dreadful I don't think that they are very big in terms of a significant number of US-based people in the Venn diagram that is the overlap between gamers and people interested in sitting down and watching an hour of a pseudo-Victorian semi-horror/investigative program.

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21 hours ago, Mankcam said:

I could see a Gaslight Boston, New York, or Paris. However although the 'Wild West' could be presented almost as another genre set in the same time frame. The same would go from where I'm from in Australia. The Victorian Gaslight flavour would only hold sway in games set in Sydney or Melbourne, with the rest of the he country presented as a Colonial era, similar to the American 'Wild West' in many ways.

Part of the problem is that the connection between the two is not made more concrete.  I just watched The Mystery of the Hansom Cab, set in Melbourne, Australia.  Pure Gaslight but with so many mentions of up-country it is obvious that folks could get into the wild north rather easily.  The best example I can think of in the US is Theodore Roosevelt; in a relatively short time he's in the Dakotas and then Police Commissioner of New York City.  The ability to go back and forth between urban and rural has always struck me as the best aspect of Gaslight settings.

Edited by Mysterioso
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21 minutes ago, nclarke said:

While I enjoy things like Ripper Street and Penny Dreadful I don't think that they are very big in terms of a significant number of US-based people in the Venn diagram that is the overlap between gamers and people interested in sitting down and watching an hour of a pseudo-Victorian semi-horror/investigative program.

If Jazz-age CoC was done up as a TV program, I suspect there'd be even less folks watching but that continues to be the default time period.  Granted it is only my experience but people get the idea of the 1890s far better than the 1920s*.  Now, if we were talking about the 1930s with the build-up to the Second World War, it would be a completely different situation.

 

*And, BTW, I'm in the US.

Edited by Mysterioso
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But for a lot of people the 1920's is within living memory of their parents or grandparents and I rather suspect (having lived in the US for a number of years) that the parallels between 2008 and the Wall Street crash brought home to many people the similarities between the two were more real than might be apparent - food banks loss of homes via bank repossession and the like.

The UK has just had a fourth and fifth series of the Peaky Blinders show greenlit and that's British gang wars in the 1920's and if that can get enough viewers for BBC 2 (a second tier channel on terrestial television) to warrant five series then someone likes it. Even if they regard it as a British version of The Sopranos there is interest there and the parallels between the numbers game run by American Mobsters and the racecourse rackets engaged in by the British  gangs are very clear even if bookkeeping on courses was legal in the UK the protection rackets used by the gangs and their turf wars were not very different. The lack of a movie industry glorifying the gangsters as the US industry did with Cagney's films is really the difference in the populations general knowledge of the period. Plus of course we didn't get Prohibition which although well meaning still affects American society today.

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