Jump to content
RosenMcStern

Revolution in 2019: International Edition and Medievalia D100

Recommended Posts

On 3/14/2019 at 2:50 PM, Jakob said:

Okay, this may be ranting, but I'll still take the opportunity to mention the one thing that truly bugs me about RD100. I first have to say that I never quite read the rules through, even though I love a lot of the concepts, and I'd be very happy about a more accessible version 2.0. But there's one actual, very minor rules thing that I can't wrap my head around: Why do so many creatures must have damage bonuses like +5d2? I know that a lot of people don''t mind or even enjoy rolling buckets of dice, but D100 systems are traditionally relatively free of such things. Furthermore, it's just not that glamorous to roll a lot of d2s ... is there any reason why this isn't converted to, say 16d+4, which has the same range?

Jakob's observations deserved a reply, but it took some time for me to find a spare 10 minutes to do so. 

Yes, there is a reason why it is not translated into something less clumsy than a "bucket of dice". The number of dice represents the sheer impact, the "kinetic energy" of the blow, which is different from "damage", which takes into account also the ability of sharp weapons to cut deep into the target flesh and bone. In classic D100 games, a sharp weapon is more likely to overcome a parry than a blunt one because it does more "damage" - the kinetic and the sharpness factor being inseparable. Mythras does not have this problem because it adds a "size" factor to all weapons, and uses it, and not "damage", to check wheter a parry can be overcome. However, this does not take into account the strength of the weapon wielder, and requires one extra variable for all weapons and attacks - and sometimes you can forget to compare sizes, particularly for creatures.

Revolution uses the number of dice - which summarizes the nature of the weapon, the hands used to wield it and the wielder's Might into a single factor - to determine how "strong" an attack is, and how difficult it will be to block its impact. Several combat effects (MIghty Blow, Overwhelm, Bypass Defense, Stun) and at least one power (Absorb Kinetic) operate on the number of dice rolled for a blow. This is quite straightforward and intuitive (each point of Might = 1d2) , and it could not work if different die sizes instead of a different number of dice were used.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
36 minutes ago, RosenMcStern said:

Jakob's observations deserved a reply, but it took some time for me to find a spare 10 minutes to do so. 

Yes, there is a reason why it is not translated into something less clumsy than a "bucket of dice". The number of dice represents the sheer impact, the "kinetic energy" of the blow, which is different from "damage", which takes into account also the ability of sharp weapons to cut deep into the target flesh and bone. In classic D100 games, a sharp weapon is more likely to overcome a parry than a blunt one because it does more "damage" - the kinetic and the sharpness factor being inseparable. Mythras does not have this problem because it adds a "size" factor to all weapons, and uses it, and not "damage", to check wheter a parry can be overcome. However, this does not take into account the strength of the weapon wielder, and requires one extra variable for all weapons and attacks - and sometimes you can forget to compare sizes, particularly for creatures.

Revolution uses the number of dice - which summarizes the nature of the weapon, the hands used to wield it and the wielder's Might into a single factor - to determine how "strong" an attack is, and how difficult it will be to block its impact. Several combat effects (MIghty Blow, Overwhelm, Bypass Defense, Stun) and at least one power (Absorb Kinetic) operate on the number of dice rolled for a blow. This is quite straightforward and intuitive (each point of Might = 1d2) , and it could not work if different die sizes instead of a different number of dice were used.

Thanks for the explanation - it actually makes a lot of sense, though it doesn't alleviate my irrational dislike of rolling a handful of dice ... but knowing the reasons behind it will at least make it easier to look past it.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

×