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Code Ronin

Argh! Decisions, Decisions, Decision!

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12 hours ago, metcalph said:

Mages who control the world:  Zzabur.  

Mages who babysit the world:  Theoblanc, Gaiseron, Cragspider

Mages who plot the destruction or conquest of the world:  Delecti, Can Shu

Important Magical Organizations:  Hrestoli School of Loskalm, Rokari School of Seshnela.  Arkati Schools of Ralios.

That's a great list.  Thanks Peter.

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7 hours ago, Jeff said:

In play, there are far fewer "killer" combinations than some forum cognoscenti seem to think. Since your starting character usually knows only 3 special Rune Spells and has 5 points of spirit magic, it gets very easy to learn what works for your character and to build up from that.

 

This is 100% true.  While certainly magic scales up to powerful stuff, RQ magic doesn't work at all mechanically like 5e where certain conditions cascade effects (apparently unexpectedly from the devs point of view) into other conditions causing mechanically unexpected results.  (ala corruption druids in 5e, who just got nerf-batted because of this).

I don't know how better to explain it, it's just not that mechanical a system   Spirit magic and Sorcery are really more or less buffing/debuffing magics (with some exceptions); divine is too but also with some flash-bangy direct effects.  

5e is mechanically a much TIGHTER game which has clear advantages for those of us with a wargamey bent *but* the tighter the if-then rules, the more they're open to (frankly) exploitation by clever players.  RQ just ain't like that.

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22 hours ago, Code Ronin said:

Second, is it relatively child-friendly? My daughter is ten now, and she games. She's played a little Pathfinder, made a character for the Starfinder game I keep trying to get off the ground, and joins me at the 5e drop-in game my FLGS runs. Getting into RuneQuest will be easier to sell to the wife if the kid can play too.

Your daughter might find these delightful pictures appealing.  So yes...absolutely it CAN be child friendly and (if I may say so) also rather woman-empowering in a way no other game I've encountered, is: (these girls seem to have been nearly celebrities at Gen Con :) )

5ae8599f86967_KhanofKhanscosplaysgirls.t

20180803_124128.thumb.jpg.3208f80d4be28af0896a7a0577b07fc6.jpg

And a great one with Greg himself:

20180803_124239.thumb.jpg.d14445fd244e3ce161bcd9c183df2acc.jpg

 

 

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Considering my daughter takes the field with me at  Amtgard (boffer LARP), these pictures are actually encouraging!

And yes, I did do some research before asking my questions, but I think I could have thought them through more.

Things I see in RQ that I like (feel free to correct me if I'm wrong about these):

  • No classes/levels. I don't have anything against them, two of my current top favorite games are class/level games (Starfinder and 5e), but I'd like a break from them.
  • That said, I do like 'template' systems, where you have some things to choose, which add things to your character, and then some wiggle room for customization. Examples of this are World of Darkness games and 7th Sea 2e.
  • Not d20. Again, I love me some d20 action, but I want a break from them
  • Not faux-medieval Europe
  • A solid, rich setting, but not one that is confining

These things said, today I will be discussing with my partner the purchase of the slipcover set.

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There's a Quickstart ruleset and basic adventure available as a free PDF here:

https://www.chaosium.com/content/FreePDFs/RuneQuest/CHA4027 - RuneQuest Quickstart.pdf

It's not the full system - in particular it lacks character creation and full magic rules. But it might let you get more of a sense for what the full system looks like before deciding whether to purchase or not.

 

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59 minutes ago, Code Ronin said:

And yes, I did do some research before asking my questions, but I think I could have thought them through more.

 

I coitainly hope you noted the comedy inherent in my lack of sympathy or even the old skool ;) thingy i tacked onto my comment.

:)

Nah, step one ask for a road map and then rather then take our word for it (though that's a start) have a look around. The research I was referring to was knowing the type of grognards we are and that like vultures we would swarm down on innocent questioners like yourself.
(and as to whether to take me seriously or not).

Cheers

Edited by Bill the barbarian

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1 hour ago, styopa said:

Your daughter might find these delightful pictures appealing.  So yes...absolutely it CAN be child friendly and (if I may say so) also rather woman-empowering in a way no other game I've encountered, is: (these girls seem to have been nearly celebrities at Gen Con :) )

5ae8599f86967_KhanofKhanscosplaysgirls.t

20180803_124128.thumb.jpg.3208f80d4be28af0896a7a0577b07fc6.jpg

And a great one with Greg himself:

20180803_124239.thumb.jpg.d14445fd244e3ce161bcd9c183df2acc.jpg

 

 

Ah yes, Vasana and Yanioth - excellent role models for girls! My 7-year daughter thinks Vasana might be cooler than Wonder Woman, as they both have swords and shields, but Vasana can cast Lightning.

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2 hours ago, Code Ronin said:

Considering my daughter takes the field with me at  Amtgard (boffer LARP), these pictures are actually encouraging!

And yes, I did do some research before asking my questions, but I think I could have thought them through more.

Things I see in RQ that I like (feel free to correct me if I'm wrong about these):

  • No classes/levels. I don't have anything against them, two of my current top favorite games are class/level games (Starfinder and 5e), but I'd like a break from them.
  • That said, I do like 'template' systems, where you have some things to choose, which add things to your character, and then some wiggle room for customization. Examples of this are World of Darkness games and 7th Sea 2e.
  • Not d20. Again, I love me some d20 action, but I want a break from them
  • Not faux-medieval Europe
  • A solid, rich setting, but not one that is confining

These things said, today I will be discussing with my partner the purchase of the slipcover set.

I'd definitely call the character generation in RQG a bit of a template system - you pick your culture, which is a template that adds some base skills, your profession (another template), and your cult (another template). It's definitely not the type of situation where you've got wide open 1000 points to spend on whatever character resource you want. 

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I run a child friendly game for players from 7 to 50yo.

RQG can run so that my 14yo Babeester Gori (warrior axe maidens HEAVILY into vengeance against rapists) gets what's going on while the 7yo remains in oblivious "I want to kill something" land, thus placating his Catholic mother.

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Purchase of slipcase set approved! Tomorrow I'm going to stop by my FLGS and order it. And encourage them to sign on with Bits & Mortar!

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7 hours ago, Code Ronin said:

Didn't make it to the game store. Ordered it straight from Chaosium. And so the waiting begins...

You can begin with the PDFs, if you want.  Chaosium includes a free d/l with each hardcopy.

OTOH, maybe you're like me, & "just not that into" e-copies of rulebooks... I got the PDF of the core on the day it was available, and was less that 1/3 of the way through it when the physical copy came available, many months later.

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1 hour ago, g33k said:

You can begin with the PDFs, if you want.  Chaosium includes a free d/l with each hardcopy.

OTOH, maybe you're like me, & "just not that into" e-copies of rulebooks... I got the PDF of the core on the day it was available, and was less that 1/3 of the way through it when the physical copy came available, many months later.

At the gaming table, physical copy 100%.

"Looking up some obscure crap, random rule I forget the details of, or creature stats when I'm sitting at work doing non-work things" - PDF 100%.

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1 minute ago, styopa said:

At the gaming table, physical copy 100%.

"Looking up some obscure crap, random rule I forget the details of, or creature stats when I'm sitting at work doing non-work things" - PDF 100%.

Oh yeah - I'm not a complete Luddite.  PDF-searching FTW!

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I consider myself old school, new tools. I like both print books and PDFs. Print books are easier to pass around the room, but my iPad is a handy gadget. With it, I don't have to worry about leaving a crucial book at home. (One of my major frustrations with the current edition of D&D is the unavailability of ebooks.) Plus with the iPad, it's easier to hide what I'm reading from my players.

Solid copy on the free ebooks from Chaosium. Still need to copy them onto my iPad, though. And is it weird that I already want to laminate the maps?

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58 minutes ago, Code Ronin said:

Solid copy on the free ebooks from Chaosium. Still need to copy them onto my iPad, though. And is it weird that I already want to laminate the maps?

On your IPad—YES!

;)

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2 hours ago, Bill the barbarian said:

On your IPad—YES!

;)

I am not laminating my iPad. For one, it's not 'my' iPad, I was originally given it so I could test our software on it. And then the touchscreen doesn't work right, and the speakers are muffled...

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5 hours ago, Code Ronin said:

And is it weird that I already want to laminate the maps?

Not at all. After watching @klecser‘s video of unboxing of the RQG slipcase set, I caught myself thinking damn, I need to frame these gorgeous maps somehow and find a place to put them up. 

And I feel the same as you: old school, because I like to have printed books populating my bookshelf real estate; new tools, because of the ease of referencing search terms and carrying around a whole library on mobile devices.

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18 hours ago, Code Ronin said:

And so the waiting begins...

And mine has arrived!!! I wasn't expecting until Thursday, so surprised to find it waiting at the door today. Looks great, and very solid slipcase.

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On 4/5/2019 at 10:32 AM, styopa said:

Your daughter might find these delightful pictures appealing.  So yes...absolutely it CAN be child friendly

Something to note on this, @Code Ronin, is that the core rulebook does contain images of nudity, if that's a concern to you. Recognizing that it may or may not be, depending on which side of the Atlantic you reside. I do feel that the nudity is used appropriately to the setting, and that additionally there's no gory or otherwise child-inappropriate images of violence. But, depending on your opinions and feelings, I do suggest looking through the book yourself to be aware of the art content before letting children meander through the work on their own.

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1 hour ago, Crel said:

Something to note on this, @Code Ronin, is that the core rulebook does contain images of nudity, if that's a concern to you.

*cough* Page 22 *cough*

Amazing piece of art, one of my favourites, but damn... bold choice... no more explicit than Vitruvian Man though.

Edited by PhilHibbs

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I've started ordering direct from Chaosium for new releases not only to support them as much as possible, but also because of those PDFs. Access to digital files makes handouts so much easier. And regarding that map issue, I take a total "action figure mentality" to it. I have my physical copy to keep it pristine, and then use the PDF to print color versions of maps that can be risked at the table. As a teacher, the thought of a botched lamination job (they happen) makes me feel sick, but to each their own. I very much prefer physical books for reading/research/display and PDFs for the practical stuff.

Edited by klecser

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3 hours ago, Crel said:

Something to note on this, @Code Ronin, is that the core rulebook does contain images of nudity, if that's a concern to you. Recognizing that it may or may not be, depending on which side of the Atlantic you reside. I do feel that the nudity is used appropriately to the setting, and that additionally there's no gory or otherwise child-inappropriate images of violence. But, depending on your opinions and feelings, I do suggest looking through the book yourself to be aware of the art content before letting children meander through the work on their own.

Yeah, page 22 is fine. We watch a lot of documentaries about ancient civilizations, and she's seen worse.

My larger concern rather than content/artwork was whether she'd be able to make a character on her own. At the venerable age of ten years old, she has already decided she Knows It All and can do anything. Seriously. When she wanted to make a Starfinder character, I just handed her the rulebook and fired up Hero Lab. At this point, I've read my way through the first hundred pages or so, and I think she's going to need some help with this, at least the first few times.

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11 minutes ago, Code Ronin said:

My larger concern rather than content/artwork was whether she'd be able to make a character on her own. At the venerable age of ten years old, she has already decided she Knows It All and can do anything. Seriously. When she wanted to make a Starfinder character, I just handed her the rulebook and fired up Hero Lab. At this point, I've read my way through the first hundred pages or so, and I think she's going to need some help with this, at least the first few times.

There's an online character creation app, which is very easy to use. There's also my Google Docs spreadsheet, which is a bit more crunchy and fiddly. Well, ok, a lot more fiddly. Definitely try the app.

 

Edited by PhilHibbs
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1 hour ago, Code Ronin said:

Yeah, page 22 is fine. We watch a lot of documentaries about ancient civilizations, and she's seen worse.

My larger concern rather than content/artwork was whether she'd be able to make a character on her own. At the venerable age of ten years old, she has already decided she Knows It All and can do anything. Seriously. When she wanted to make a Starfinder character, I just handed her the rulebook and fired up Hero Lab. At this point, I've read my way through the first hundred pages or so, and I think she's going to need some help with this, at least the first few times.

10?  She'll crush it without batting an eye.

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