Jump to content
Newt

OpenQuest 3rd Edition Current Status

Recommended Posts

Slowly but surely plans are being laid and turned into action to bring OpenQuest back to life. A Kickstarted new edition of the rules, and an ongoing Patreon to support the release of new and revised adventures.

I’m currently working on OpenQuest 3rd Edition, in preparation of a Kickstarter to be launched in Aug/Sept to tie in with its 10 year anniversary. It’s not as a radical revision of the system that I thought it would be at one stage but its enough to call it 3rd Edition.
Highlights so far:

  • Combat now has systems for Social (new) and Magic (revised spirit combat)
  • Combat order now based on highest modified skill.
  • Magic just one system (Sorcerers and Priests just become specialist caster types, but everyone uses one common magic list, spend magic points).
  • New rules for Organisations which replaces the cult rules and extend to guilds and less magical organisation.

I want a system that can support lots of new funky fantasy adventures (and other genres) that’s simple yet mega-fun to play but has a few more modern standards built into it.

As well as the Kickstarter there will be an ongoing Patreon called OpenQuest Adventures, to fund what fans really want ADVENTURES without me having to point out that these are quite risky releases for D100 systems,  When I get enough support for the Patreon I will commission other authors to write adventures. I’m putting the pieces in place of this to launch at the beginning of May, and the first release will come bundled with a playtest version of OpenQuest 3rd Ed.

The last thing on my current roadmap is playtesting, which opens up next week. I’ve already done a fair bit of playtesting, the social combat rules got a good run out a couple of months ago at one shot game at Go Play Manchester for example, but this will be the first time I’ve put everything together and see how it flows. A call for open playtesting will happen sometime in early June.

So OpenQuest 3rd edition dates for your diary:

  • Now: internal playtest begins, watch out for actual play-reports.
  • Early May: OpenQuest Adventures Patreon opens.
  • Early June, Public playtest.
  • Aug/Sept: OpenQuest 3rd Edition Kickstarter to coincide with the 10th Anniversary of the game’s original release.
  • Like 5

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Sounds good!

One thing I'd really like would be some more thought on specialisation. Nothing wrong with keeping the generalist as standard PC, but characters that are more focussed (on combat, magic, general skills ...) always seemed to be an afterthought in OQ. I feel that providing guidance on specialisation is always a good thing for a potential introductury rpg.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Speicalist magicians are there, because some folk are going to be wanting to start as The Wizard, The Shaman etc. its any easy one, they don't get any skill points when generating combat skills (which therefore start at their bases) and in return get to spend those skill points on magic skills, and pick extra spells from a spell list that other starting characters 

Other specialists, such as the Theif and D&D Monks, for example, will be shown via ready-made concepts, which are a lot more robust in this edition (more like ready-made characters than lists of typical skills and spells). 

There will also be explanatory text for newcomers, especially those coming from Class based games. 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Sounds like changes I’d like to see to magic. Having a single system a la Call of Cthulhu or Stormbringer/Magic World sorcery is far simpler and avoids unnecessary duplication of spells with the same purpose (e.g. second sight, soul sight, mystic vision).

 I would suggest that very powerful spells have a POW cost, as with CoC, instead of or in addition to MP cost.

Edited by yojimbo

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I hope Magic will look like Sorcery, with flexible casting, and not Battle Magic, with fixed effects and costs.

Fixed effects and costs could be an option for non-professional magic practitionners, which could buy "ready to cast" spells inside crystals or other minor enchants.

I also hope "ready-made concepts" are not going to be full classes, but rather character creation guidelines.

On 5/4/2019 at 2:13 PM, yojimbo said:

 I would suggest that very powerful spells have a POW cost, as with CoC, instead of or in addition to MP cost.

OpenQuest has always favored spending Improvement Points in places where RuneQuest required POW.

But RQ POW is meant to fluctuate a lot, contrarily to CoC.

Edited by Mugen

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I wonder how this affects the timing of the adventure I am working on now. If I'm going to release in mid-to-late August or early September, will I need notes on OQ3 compsatibi8lit (particularly with the new magic system)? I want it to be playable "out of the box" for anyone familiar with d100 (in any form). The new rules sound intriguing as potential for future work, though. Social Combat, in particular, might be especially helpful in any adventure involving interpersonal intrigue, whether in a guild hall or the court of the Scarlet Emperor of Rhye.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi! I find OpenQuest to be the only "simple" iteration of the BRP rules nowadays, except perhaps the defunct Magic World. I find the other BRP incarnations too crunchy in the Combat side, something I'm less interested as the years pass. A link to detailed progress, and examples, of the new OpenQuest would be really nice. Just wanted to say this, and that I'm looking forward to the 3rd Edition!

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Current status, is that despite my bold timetable to get it out this year, I'm now currently having another pass of writing. There has been my own playtest games of the work in progress, a recent one at Grogmeet 2019 in my home city of Manchester, which have happily confirmed the route I'm taking OQ3.

Couple of new developments:

As a well as one magic system, with rules for specialist casters (so you can still have Priests, Sorcerers and Shamans), I currently plan (subject to successfull playtesting) to go Magic Pointless.

Spirits and spirit combat is getting a review, with the aim of making this area very straightforward.

Character generation has had another pass, and Culture & Careers are now in rather than the current free form jack of all trades approach. Its simpler more direct, familier to D100 players coming in from other D100 games, and makes setting up Settings for the game much easier.

The magic chapter has had another pass and many many issues with the spell list has been fixed. It will have another since there's a raft of new spells I want to add in, and my latest pass identified a hand full of spells that need modifying or removed.

The creatures chapter is going to be reorganised. As well as the tools to use the monster entries as templates to roll up npc/individuals, the average member of the species will be more detailed with spells so its more pick up and play.

I'm going to have a final Playtest version of OQ 3 done by the Christmas holiday, and after a short internal playtest to find and fix any major show stoppers, I'll be posting the playest rules online for an open-playtest, with the aim of kickstarting the final rules - with lots of adventure stretch goals, by Early Summer 2020.  

  • Like 7
  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

We get an OQ Christmas Present!

I've backed every edition of OpenQuest so far and will definitely support this one too.

I wonder if this will encourage Cakebread & Walton to revise Renaissance (hint, hint)? That would be cool...

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 11/24/2019 at 10:13 PM, Prime Evil said:

I wonder if this will encourage Cakebread & Walton to revise Renaissance (hint, hint)? That would be cool...

It would be cool, but bare in mind Ken (Walton) is still recovering from a pretty serious cancer operation, which is why you've not heard from the dynamic duo in a while.

I'm putting plans together to better support 3rd Party OQ3 publishers, that I'll be unveiling really soon ;)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
58 minutes ago, Newt said:

It would be cool, but bare in mind Ken (Walton) is still recovering from a pretty serious cancer operation, which is why you've not heard from the dynamic duo in a while.

I'm putting plans together to better support 3rd Party OQ3 publishers, that I'll be unveiling really soon ;)

Yeah...it's sad that he is having such terrible medical issues. Our thoughts are with him.

I'm keen to hear what your plans for third-party publishers are. I'd love to adapt some of the spells I originally designed for Legend (bearing in mind that OQ is a lighter rule system).

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
28 minutes ago, Prime Evil said:

I'm keen to hear what your plans for third-party publishers are. I'd love to adapt some of the spells I originally designed for Legend (bearing in mind that OQ is a lighter rule system).

I'll be unveiling them when I open up the public playtest.

As for spells, while OQ core I'm currently working on tidying it up and keepign the overall list as short as possible (as I've done in previous editions), its all now one big spell list and I've added critical and fumble results, so people new to the system have something to work with.  Also makes OQ 3 magic a bit more  risky.

 

Quote

Befuddle
Type: Offensive.
Resist (Persistence).  

On a failed resistance roll the victim of this spell is left confused and incapable of rational thought.  The affected target may not cast spells and may only take non-offensive actions. The target may run if they so choose and may dodge and parry normally in combat, though they may not make any attacks unless they are attacked first.

This spell is effective against humanoids and natural creatures. Other creatures (such as spirits or magical beasts like dragons) are not affected by this spell.

  • Critical: The spell completely overcomes the Target, who may not roll for resistance or take any action (even non-offensive ones) except babble incoherently rooted to the spot for the duration of the spell.
  • Fumble: The spell backfires and effects the caster who must make a resistance test. On a successful test the spell effects them as per normal casting success. On a fail the effects are as for a Critical above.

 

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 12/18/2019 at 11:18 AM, Newt said:

I'll be unveiling them when I open up the public playtest.

As for spells, while OQ core I'm currently working on tidying it up and keepign the overall list as short as possible (as I've done in previous editions), its all now one big spell list and I've added critical and fumble results, so people new to the system have something to work with.  Also makes OQ 3 magic a bit more  risky.

 

 

I'm confused by the befuddle critical and fumble effects, as I always assumed Resistance rolls used the skill opposition rules.

My first reaction was to think Befuddle was just an exception to the rule, but if that was the case the fumble effect would be almost pointless, given how easy it is to resist a fumbled roll.

Did the rule change since first edition, or did I read it wrong from the start ?

Also, concerning opposed rolls, what is the current status concerning the case where both protagonists fail ? In first edition, it was "the one with the lowest roll wins". If it's still the case, IMHO it should be replaced with "the highest roll wins", to have the same rule in both cases.

Edited by Mugen
  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The key to understanding this is that the Critical and Fumble effects are coming from the results of the Caster's Magic Casting skill test not the target's resistance test.

I should have added that as an extra bit of explaination. This is the relevant bits from Magic Casting rules in the Magic chapter.

 

Quote

Critical Success

A critical success on a Magic Casting test means that the caster has been able to control the flow of the magic particularly effectively.

The result for a critical effect is given for each spell after its description, but usually the spell’s effect is usually maxed out or extended. So for example for an offensive spell that does damage it will do the maximum damage.

Fumble

A fumble on a Magic Casting test means that the caster has been unable to control the flow of the Magic. As well as the effect given at the end of the spell’s description the character may not use that spell for the remainder of the gaming session.

Note in OQ 3 there are no magic points, so fumbles (which happen on a failed roll where the tens and units dice match) manage when the caster runs out of spells.

Also opposed skill tests have changed in OQ3. Here's the rules and example from the draft:

Quote

Opposed Skill Tests

This type of skill test occurs when the player character has an opponent, such as non-player character, who opposes their efforts.

It uses the same procedure as a Basic Skill Test, but when the Referee considers situational modifiers (see Basic Test Procedure Step 5), they compare the modified skill of the player (after situational or modifiers from magic has been added to their skill) vs the modified skill of the opposing character.

  • If the opponent’s modified skill is higher than the character’s modified skill by up to 50%, apply a -20 modifier.
  • If the opponent’s modified skill when compared with the character’s modified skill is over 50%, apply a -50 modifier. 

All the rules that apply to Basic Skill Tests, such as fumbles, failing forward, critical successes, automatic success and failure, apply to Opposed Skill tests.

Rurik Recklessly Sneaks Past the Watch

This is a worked example of an opposed skill contest.

It’s curfew in the big city and Rurik fancies going to the after-hours drinking session at a local tavern. As he heads down the street towards the alehouse. On the way he sees a member of the city’s police force, the Watch, walking up the opposite side of the road. Rurik, being Rurik, decides to sneak past the watchman, by creeping up the dark side of the road.

The Referee calls for a Deception skill test from Rurik since this skill deals with sneaking. Rurik’s Deception skill is only 22% as he is big, clumsy and trained as a warrior and not a thief. Fortunately for Rob, Rurik’s player, the Referee decides that being on the dark side of the street significantly helps Rurik, making the test simple (+20%), which means that Rurik’s Deception is now 42% for this test. This is fortunate for Rurik because the watchman’s Perception is 40%, because this is what he does for a living every night, If Rurik had not bothered to move through the shadows,  the Referee would have applied a -20% modifier to Rurik’s Deception  due to Watchman having a higher Perception skill.

Rurik's player now makes the skill test using a D100 dice.

  •  If Rurik’s player  rolls a 7, he succeeds and Rurik sneaks past the watchman on the darkened side of the street.
  •  If Rurik’s player rolls a 65 and fails. The watchman spots a shape in the shadows and heads over to investigate.
  •  If Rurik’s player rolls a 33, a critical, Rurik quickly runs by the Watchman in record time.
  •  If Rurik’s player rolls a 66, a fumble, Rurik makes so much noise that all the local Watch hear him and come to investigate!

 

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

So, skill checks aren't really opposed to another skill check anymore, but characters with a skill superior to yours will reduce your effective skill by 20 or 50%. Do I understand it correctly ?

If so, deciding who makes the roll will be very important: if we both have 75% in our skill, I'll have 75% chance to succeed if I roll, and only 25% if you roll.

I must say I prefer opposition rules where the difference in skills define your chance of success, and a character opposing another one with similar skill level has ~50% chance of success, whether they have 20 or 90% in their respective skills.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 1/4/2020 at 2:57 PM, Mugen said:

So, skill checks aren't really opposed to another skill check anymore, but characters with a skill superior to yours will reduce your effective skill by 20 or 50%. Do I understand it correctly ?

That's how I read it. As a corollary to this.

If the opposition has skill less than 50% below my PC's do I gain +20% to effective skill?

And if opposition is more than 50% less competent do I gain +50%?

 

On 1/4/2020 at 2:57 PM, Mugen said:

If so, deciding who makes the roll will be very important: if we both have 75% in our skill, I'll have 75% chance to succeed if I roll, and only 25% if you roll.

Going out on a limb here, but I'd guess the player rolls if opposed by an NPC. If the conflict is between two PCs? Presumably the one who is active rolls (or the GM's favourite).

On 1/4/2020 at 2:57 PM, Mugen said:

I must say I prefer opposition rules where the difference in skills define your chance of success, and a character opposing another one with similar skill level has ~50% chance of success, whether they have 20 or 90% in their respective skills.

It potentially looks quite neat doesn't it?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


×
×
  • Create New...