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Dragon Pass cuisine

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On 6/3/2019 at 3:51 AM, soltakss said:

Sartarites farm sheep and cattle...

According to older sources, Sartarites also raise pigs and geese. They'd have access to goose eggs (much bigger and gamier than hen's eggs). Pigs would provide salt pork and lard to flavor food. Salmon is available in season. I'd expect Sartarite children would fish, gather berries, catch crawfish, gather wild bird eggs, and kill and trap small game as part of their family responsibilities/play activities. I did the first three growing up in the 70s, my father did all five in the 40s. Wild and domestic honey would both be common.

Woodland tea would be a fairly common beverage (made from juniper, spruce, fir, etc.) 

And of course, there's haggis. THERE MUST BE HAGGIS!

Eels are probably a thing. Roasted and smoked.

Native nuts gathered in season would include chestnuts and walnuts. Acorns and pine nuts would both be eaten.

Food taboos in Sartar include (IMO) goats and snails. Depending on the tribe, nonsentient ducks might also be taboo out of respect for the Durulz. I doubt Sartarites eat horse or cats, but they happily kill and eat wild dogs when they find them (except Lismelder tribe).

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There's a ton of grasses & flowering plants that are usually only seen as weeds that are edible.  The common nettle is a good example, as is sorrel, thistles, dandelion, and a whole slew of other stuff. It's not going to be anyone's staple food, but it's nutritious and good to have alongside vitamin, and mineral-poor cereals and dairy. Additionally, considering they often come in early summer, they are probably going to be useful for supplementing the diet in the time when winter stocks are running low and the first harvest is not yet in.

There are also mushrooms of course. Some cultures have seen them as taboo IRL due to the difficulty at time of identifying poisonous variants from edible ones, but many others have used a lot of mushrooms.

Dragon pass might be good plum or cherry country for all I know. Good for drinks or pies (or whatever the Bronze Age equivalent of pies are).

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Just now, Sir_Godspeed said:

pies (or whatever the Bronze Age equivalent of pies are).

The Bronze Age equivalent of pies are... pies.

From wikipedia: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pie

"Early pies were in the form of flat, round or freeform crusty cakes called galettes, consisting of a crust of ground oats, wheat, rye, or barley containing honey inside. These galettes developed into a form of early sweet pastry or desserts, evidence of which can be found on the tomb walls of the Pharaoh Ramesses II, who ruled from 1304 to 1237 BC, located in the Valley of the Kings.[2] Sometime before 2000 BC, a recipe for chicken pie was written on a tablet in Sumer.[3]

Ancient Greeks are believed to have originated pie pastry. In the plays of Aristophanes (5th century BC), there are mentions of sweetmeats including small pastries filled with fruit. Nothing is known of the actual pastry used, but the Greeks certainly recognized the trade of pastry-cook as distinct from that of baker."

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3 minutes ago, Sir_Godspeed said:

There's a ton of grasses & flowering plants that are usually only seen as weeds that are edible.  The common nettle is a good example, as is sorrel, thistles, dandelion, and a whole slew of other stuff. It's not going to be anyone's staple food, but it's nutritious and good to have alongside vitamin, and mineral-poor cereals and dairy. Additionally, considering they often come in early summer, they are probably going to be useful for supplementing the diet in the time when winter stocks are running low and the first harvest is not yet in.

There are also mushrooms of course. Some cultures have seen them as taboo IRL due to the difficulty at time of identifying poisonous variants from edible ones, but many others have used a lot of mushrooms.

Dragon pass might be good plum or cherry country for all I know. Good for drinks or pies (or whatever the Bronze Age equivalent of pies are).

In Crete, the old women gather 'weeds' every day for cooking, to my observation. There's also pine-nuts; pesto was invented as a food for withstanding a siege...

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1 hour ago, RHW said:

The Bronze Age equivalent of pies are... pies.

 

And upon the 14th day of the third season (that being the season of Earth when Ernalda and all her earthly kin rain bounty down upon their faithful) that all celebrate that mathematical wonder of Addafix Calcuii of Karse's slightly less famous temple of knowledge. This worthy sage impressed all his brethren by putting to sleep the entire city ring of Karse by expounding for 23 and a half hours on  how the 14 day of the third season (yada, yada, yada Earth) become 3.14 and... you know I am really not sure, it was at this point that I fell asleep.

In any case, the only good thing as far as the non-Lhankor Mhyan are concerned was that he explained his theory with what was easily to hand in Earth season. the heavenly pie, perfect in its circularity! To this day all celebrate Pi day (Addafix was a good mathematician but a verey pour spelr)! One can find Eurmali also celebrating in their own unique way by hitting pompous sages right in the pusses with a big merengue pi.

Cheers

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15 hours ago, RHW said:

According to older sources, Sartarites also raise pigs and geese. They'd have access to goose eggs (much bigger and gamier than hen's eggs). Pigs would provide salt pork and lard to flavor food. Salmon is available in season. I'd expect Sartarite children would fish, gather berries, catch crawfish, gather wild bird eggs, and kill and trap small game as part of their family responsibilities/play activities. I did the first three growing up in the 70s, my father did all five in the 40s. Wild and domestic honey would both be common.

Woodland tea would be a fairly common beverage (made from juniper, spruce, fir, etc.) 

And of course, there's haggis. THERE MUST BE HAGGIS!

Eels are probably a thing. Roasted and smoked.

Native nuts gathered in season would include chestnuts and walnuts. Acorns and pine nuts would both be eaten.

Food taboos in Sartar include (IMO) goats and snails. Depending on the tribe, nonsentient ducks might also be taboo out of respect for the Durulz. I doubt Sartarites eat horse or cats, but they happily kill and eat wild dogs when they find them (except Lismelder tribe).

Pretty much all spot on. Lots of pork, lots of cured meat. Lots of salmon. There's beefalo as well (most cattle have some bison in them) and Praxian animals (which of course can be found in Dragon Pass).

I suspect instead of haggis there is something equally controversial - Andouillette!

 https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Andouillette.

Andouillette is also a great cultural divide between the north and the south of France - as Wikipedia correctly observes, "Although sometimes repellent to the uninitiated, this aspect of andouillette is prized by its devotees." (I am one of those devotees). If you want to preserve that divide, then Sartar eats andouilette, Esrolia does not.

Edited by Jeff

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2 hours ago, Kloster said:

Long live the Andouillette!!

So I take the link  to read about the history—you know, something relevant to our bronze age setting—of this delicacy and what does it say?

Quote

The original composition of "andouillette sausages" is not known and there is no record of the andouillette's composition from earlier than the nineteenth century.

So, after the nineteenth century we know what's in it, and before its a mystery meat!

Oh great,  the Bronze Age Donair!

Edited by Bill the barbarian

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Ah, the legendary andouillette. Tried it once down in Annecy. I didn’t get on with it and it didn’t get on with me. The next morning the toilet was declared a fallout zone, full noddy (NBC) suit needed for access. I’ll give most foods a go, but I found my match with that. 

Edit.

I can imagine the amusing scenes when Sartarites serve this ‘delicacy’ to honour visiting dignitaries. 

Edited by Cloud64
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On 6/1/2019 at 2:08 PM, Quackatoa said:

Great post! I've always loved the development of food in fantasy worlds.

 

Your material in my view captures everything I love about Glorantha and always hits the spot. 

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What about the durulz? I can imagine them enjoying all sorts of vegetable/fruit/grain-based dishes, but not all that much meat. Maybe fish (esp. stews) and escargot/snail dishes?

Plus, one can imagine some Sartarite combining the formal observance of hospitality with insult, by serving a visiting duck waterfowl for dinner. Duck for a duck, anyone?

 

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On 6/1/2019 at 10:18 PM, Sir_Godspeed said:

It's an idea that's been floating about. Not sure about the canonicity, but it does make some sense for me, to better set them opposed to the pastoral Orlanthi Barbarian belt.

Then again, Six Ages has the myth of Yelm herding his cattle, so who knows.*

(*Granted, herding cattle does not necessarily mean lactose tolerance is prevalent, as evidenced by South- and East-Asia, who, while majority intolerant, still use cattle widely, and produce naturally lactose-reduced products like butter, cheese (to some extent) and ghee).

It actually explicitly states that they didn't drink milk at that time:

Quote

In exchange for these boons - the sweet grass, the warm pen - Busenari fed the Emperor and his household. In those days people did not drink milk for sustenance, instead preferring a rejuvenating mead. But they did eat beef.

Most likely the practice (and even ability) to drink animal milk was something the refugees from the Empire needed to develop independently to survive out in the wilderness. Which is probably why the Riders drink kumis (i.e. fermented horse milk) as their primary alcoholic beverage; kumis can be drunken even by people who are lactose-intolerant. They may have received the "kumis gift" from Gamari before Busenari and Uryarda gifted them the ability to drink milk.

On 6/5/2019 at 10:24 AM, Cloud64 said:

I can imagine the amusing scenes when Sartarites serve this ‘delicacy’ to honour visiting dignitaries. 

Well that makes me wonder if Sartar also has resinated wines: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Retsina

Quote

The Roman settlements in Illyria, Cisalpine Gaul and Gallia Narbonensis did not use resin-coated amphorae due to the lack of suitable local pine trees and began to develop solid, less leak-prone wooden barrels in the 1st century CE. By the 3rd century, barrel making was prevalent throughout the Roman Empire. The exception was the eastern empire regions of Byzantium which had developed a taste for the strong, pungent wine and continued to produce resinated wine long after the western Roman empire stopped. The difference in taste between the two empires took center stage in the work of the historian Liutprand of Cremona and his Relatio de Legatione Constantinopolitana. In 968, Liutprand was sent to Constantinople to arrange a marriage between the daughter of the late Emperor Romanos II and the future Holy Roman Emperor Otto II. According to Liutprand, he was treated very rudely and in an undignified manner by the court of Nikephoros II, being served goat stuffed with onion and served in fish sauce and "undrinkable" wine mixed with resin, pitch and gypsum—very offensive to his Germanic tastes.

Although I could also see it as something more associated with the Tarsh Exiles.

Edited by Leingod
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Last weekend I stumbled upon what is surely a leak from Glorantha into our reality – a tipple clearly favoured by ducks must have slipped through a wormhole to find itself at a pub in the New Forest on the south coast of England. Alas, as the designated driver I cannot vouch for the efficacy or otherwise of this tempting cider, and I confess to wondering at the provenance of the apples from which it is brewed – could they be from a certain famous village on the road to Runegate?

 

DandyDab.jpg

 

This is actually brewed fairly locally to me, so I shall report back on its gustatious qualities when I next track down a pint.

Edited by Cloud64
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