Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  
albinoboo

Current Safelster canon

Recommended Posts

I get the feeling that an architecture historian would find some of these examples a bit odd for a Bronze Age/Antiquity-centred setting (some of these palaces and forts are from well after 1000 AD, more like 14-1700s, iirc., although I'm not an expert). They certainly look great though.

The unifying concept of "onion-domes" in both Indian/Persian-inspired Seshnela and Russian-inspired Akem is pretty neat though.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
14 minutes ago, Sir_Godspeed said:

The unifying concept of "onion-domes" in both Indian/Persian-inspired Seshnela and Russian-inspired Akem is pretty neat though.

I agree, I think medieval Russia is a helpful visual for imagining the Fronelan west. Although the designers have specifically stated that Jonatela and other places are definitely not medieval Eastern Europe, I think a GM could still  borrow architectural ideas to paint a clearer picture. And Fronela has a lot of timber to make use of, so I could see their temples looking more like these Russian wooden cathedrals-

800px-Kizhi_church_1.thumb.jpg.15386d04608c8a82f80d5a025804b63d.jpg

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Regarding the Onion Dome, I find it helpful to borrow the explanation for the architectural feature rather than posit the Jonatings as Russians. ie they represent Candles, they are meant to pierce Heaven so that the blessings of the Sky fall out etc.

  • Like 4

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

@M Helsdon Thanks, yes, I know "sâr" is considered to mean king, I was not proposing to use the title in the original sense; just that the sound was similar enough to convey continuity while shaking off the medieval feeling. Duke was used in Rome and king is nearly ubiquitous, so I have less problem with it.

I confess that my only trouble with Glorantha is in titles and toponomastic and I have changed nearly everything for my campaign. It is a bit silly I know but my imagination is mainly fueled by names so I have to live with that. 

The best inspiration I know for Glorantha is the Salammbô novel by Gustave Flaubert (whose art by Mucha seems to have served as model for Jar-Eel famous picture*), I don't know if there is a good enough translation in English to convey the splendor of the original.

Compare

https://www.wikiart.org/en/alphonse-mucha/salammbô-1896

and  

https://www.artstation.com/artwork/yb4wD8

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Material and technology is shaping architecture. Technology including enchantments and sorcery when it comes to Glorantha.

Poured concrete is mentioned as a technology employed in Pelanda in the Entekosiad, alongside bronze-clad hoplites.

Wooden mega-architecture doesn't have that many ways to go, although the wooden core can easily be hidden by a layer of plaster. Still, it is hard to avoid reminiscences of staff churches, Kiewian fortifications, Fort Laramie, etc.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
4 hours ago, Joerg said:

Material and technology is shaping architecture. Technology including enchantments and sorcery when it comes to Glorantha.

Poured concrete is mentioned as a technology employed in Pelanda in the Entekosiad, alongside bronze-clad hoplites.

Wooden mega-architecture doesn't have that many ways to go, although the wooden core can easily be hidden by a layer of plaster. Still, it is hard to avoid reminiscences of staff churches, Kiewian fortifications, Fort Laramie, etc.

You can span a great distance with wood than you can with stone, however in the Mediterranean climate, and further south, termites will eat the wood sooner or later. Hence the use of stone and mud brick for monumental buildings. The development of stone vaulting allowed greater distances to be spanned. However in the right climatic zone, a Greek design temple would have fewer supporting columns than the stone equivalent. A Gloranthan equivlant of Cedar of Lebanon that can produce beams around 30m in length gives a lot of freedom with design. 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
4 hours ago, albinoboo said:

You can span a great distance with wood than you can with stone, however in the Mediterranean climate, and further south, termites will eat the wood sooner or later.

True, the wooden roof construction of Constantine the Great's basilika in Trier lasted until about 50 years ago in the German climate (though in an airy and dry environment, without any other material than timber involved in the construction).

Wood exposed to rain and sunlight will only last a few years in German climate - a well-impregnated scaffold around the caravan parking lot next to my house was reduced from three inch solid timber to paper thin remnants within two decades. Forgetting a gardening tool outside last autumn meant that the 1.5 inch diameter wooden handle had rotted so much that even light stress made it break.

4 hours ago, albinoboo said:

Hence the use of stone and mud brick for monumental buildings. The development of stone vaulting allowed greater distances to be spanned. However in the right climatic zone, a Greek design temple would have fewer supporting columns than the stone equivalent. A Gloranthan equivlant of Cedar of Lebanon that can produce beams around 30m in length gives a lot of freedom with design. 

Dead wood buildings exposed to the elements (and wasps) require maintenance and constant replacement of exposed portions of timber.

One way to prevent such exposure is to plaster or chalk such constructions, creating a look indistinguishable from a plastered stone or brick structure. But this very act will weaken at least the outside of the timber so covered, weakening the structure from the onset in exchange for keeping off damage.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

but one could had into the rituals a constant renewing of the wooden structure as part of a religious activity/meditation, as in the case of the Ise temple in Japan. It adds a nice touch, I think

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
52 minutes ago, Joerg said:

Wood exposed to rain and sunlight will only last a few years in German climate - a well-impregnated scaffold around the caravan parking lot next to my house was reduced from three inch solid timber to paper thin remnants within two decades. Forgetting a gardening tool outside last autumn meant that the 1.5 inch diameter wooden handle had rotted so much that even light stress made it break.

Regular tarring of wood can push survivability into many decades' worth of time in temperate climate, especially if it's a whole-timbered structure.

Ultimately though, yes, wood needs replacing during regular maintenance. Thankfully, replacing wood is certainly doable.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
26 minutes ago, Joerg said:

True, the wooden roof construction of Constantine the Great's basilika in Trier lasted until about 50 years ago in the German climate (though in an airy and dry environment, without any other material than timber involved in the construction).

Wood exposed to rain and sunlight will only last a few years in German climate - a well-impregnated scaffold around the caravan parking lot next to my house was reduced from three inch solid timber to paper thin remnants within two decades. Forgetting a gardening tool outside last autumn meant that the 1.5 inch diameter wooden handle had rotted so much that even light stress made it break.

Dead wood buildings exposed to the elements (and wasps) require maintenance and constant replacement of exposed portions of timber.

One way to prevent such exposure is to plaster or chalk such constructions, creating a look indistinguishable from a plastered stone or brick structure. But this very act will weaken at least the outside of the timber so covered, weakening the structure from the onset in exchange for keeping off damage.

Depends on the wood. Untread softwood will rot , hardwoods like Oak will last longer but some species last. Douglas Fir, Iron Wood, Cedar and   Chestnut last centuries even in the ground.  The Vikings used a method to prepare pine, in which they would deliberately wound the tree so that pine resin would leak out and form a natural preservative. That's why there a is an  11th Century stave  Church at Urnes in Norway. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, albinoboo said:

in which they would deliberately wound the tree so that pine resin would leak out and form a natural preservative.

Pine elf armor! Their warriors deliberately scarify their bodies to ooze resinous sap that solidifies into a natural armor.

  • Like 4
  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
15 minutes ago, jajagappa said:

Pine elf armor! Their warriors deliberately scarify their bodies to ooze resinous sap that solidifies into a natural armor.

YGMV

But this is certainly part of MY Glorantha now!  (tyvm)

  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

These guys as living fly traps would be extra delicious to trolls, you know?

Also, they would leave behind lots of amber after death.

Edited by Joerg
  • Thanks 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Sign in to follow this  

×
×
  • Create New...