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Ema Nymton

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  • RPG Biography
    Keeper for CoC 7e and FF Star Wars RPG
  • Current games
    CoC 1920s, Star Wars: Force and Destiny
  • Location
    UK
  • Blurb
    Has worked in the theatre and film industry for over 20 years.
    CoC provides excellent escapism, plus the opportunity to tell some amazing stories with friends.
    Currently running 2 campaigns for Call of Cthulhu 7e including Masks of Nyarlathotep.
    Happy to introduce new players at beginner level (time permitting).

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  1. In general the need to call for a Spot Hidden or wait for a prompt from the Investigators will be situational. Asking the players to make Spot Hidden rolls can break the mystery if you're not careful, as it automatically tells them that there is something to discover. If you've just described a room and then an Investigator says they'd like to search the room/desk/bookcase etc and there is the potential for them to find a clue, then the response would be "ok, make a Spot Hidden". If the Investigators are being tailed or watched as they're walking the streets during a regular activity, then (unless they've been provided narrative motivation) they are unlikely to always ask if there's anything suspicious they can see. At this point the Keeper would ask for a Spot Hidden. Always consider immersion. If the players can lead the way and you can react to their decisions with the appropriate rolls, they'll feel a greater sense of success. Although, if it feels like they're about to miss something important, then you could give them a last minute opportunity by asking the roll yourself. I hope that helps.
  2. In addition to the grenade/dynamite example, Keeper Rulebook p406 has guidance for damage based on radius of effect: 2 yards, 3 yards, etc.: Damage radius of explosion in yards; at up to double the range, the damage is halved. At up to triple the range, the damage is quartered. Beyond that damage is ignored. p.405 lists the most common explosive devices and relevent dam/radius
  3. Mike did a post on this not too long ago. Forum Link They added a plain text version of the handouts to the Masks pdf download pack. If you purchased your original hard copy or pdf from the Chaosium site you should be able to download it from your account. Outside of that, perhaps someone in the community can share the info you're looking for. Sorry I can't help further. Stay sane. 🦑 Ema
  4. Thanks T.O. Completely agree with allowing the investigators imaginations to be an integral part of the narrative process. And I'd always say this is a key aspect of successfully running any scenario. Less is often more. However, in this instance, the eggs are so integral to the story, being regularly manipulated by NPC's and the Investigstors, that not only should the investigators be able to imagine them, as Keeper, I too need to be able to visualise them, so I can appropriately incorporate them into the action and story. I'm more than happy to make this up. But the scenario clearly tries to describe 'something'. It just doesn't do it well (imo) and I'm interested to understand what it is trying to get across. How have other people imagined these eggs, or interpreted them to look?
  5. Ok. So I'm running Ties That Bind (from Doors to Darkness) for my group this week. Overall, a relatively straight forward scenario. Now, I'm not sure why, but for the life of me I can't get my head around what these 'rocks' found in the fountain look like. I find the description given in the scenario both overly vague and confusing. (4 layers of bananas??) And comparing the description of them to the artwork just confused me more. Can any kind soul out there please give me a clearer description of how you thought they looked. Size, shape, number etc. Thanks in advance. Ema
  6. Best thing that ever happened to me and my group of friends. Many years of happiness awaits. Enjoy. Welcome to the madness.
  7. Keeper rulebook p.94 in relation to the investigator development phase: "(Roll 1d100 for skill checks) If the player rolls higher than the current skill number, or the result is over 95, then the investigator improves in that skill: roll 1D10 and immediately add the result to the current skill points. Skills may rise above 100% by this method." Rolling 95+ is low on the odds table, meaning it's unlikely to happen frequently. But the rules say you're ok. There is also a suggestion in character creation p.48 (optional rules) that you don't allow starting stats to be too high, so as not to unbalance the game. (75 is the given example). Hope that helps.
  8. This is my understanding too. One attempt (plus a push) - per injury (i.e. another attempt can be made once a separate incident of damage is taken) When dying - one attempt per round to stabilise. (Success giving a temporary hit point, failure requiring a CON roll at the end of the round to stay alive) ----- The Combat Damage Flow Chart (Core, p.413) is a great aid for this. Just remember that each pass through the chart is from a single incident. i.e. Only pass through the 'Damage from a Single Wound' chart once. You can't pass through it again until you once more take Damage From a Single Wound. Same for 'Hit Points Fall to Zero', except here you can enter a loop of healing attempts depending upon the rolls.
  9. I'm a relatively new keeper for CoC (approx 7mnth) and have only played 7e. I can totally see the issues with Chases... on paper/in theory, and I was also reluctant to run them. I think, like many others, the impression given by the rulebook is that immersion will be broken by the setup process and mechanical nature of running them. However I have now utilised the system with two separate groups (in the majority as part of the Genius Loci scenario), doing both foot and car chases and I can actually confirm what many others have concluded... Chases play far far better than they read in the book. They were actually very enjoyable, especially when everyone participates in the story telling of the events. Personally, I found the key was prepping the initial 'math' in advance. Having everyone's dex and mov rates written down, just asking for the CON roll and narrating the results whilst assigning the placements of Pursuers and Fleers. Trying to streamline this initial setup, as a Keeper, so the mechanics of it wasn't a distraction to the players... That's my suggestion and what worked for me. There's a few comments on the chase system throughout the forums. Now that people have been running them for a longer period of time, I'd be interested to hear any further thoughts the community has on the topic, especially those who were initially reluctant to run them and subsequently have given it a try. Can I also add, that as a relative 'newbie', I think this community is excellent. I wish I'd come to the party sooner. I have never enjoyed RPGs as much, or had as much fun with my friends as I have since discovering this. Thanks everyone.
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