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My First Time GMing Runequest!

klecser

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Last night was my first time GMing Runequest. As a veteran GM of DND (all versions since 2) and Call of Cthulhu, the challenge for me was making sure that I effectively communicated just enough Glorantha lore, system feel, and fun all in one evening. I think it went well. I did a lot of prep for this game, with most it focusing on making sure I had blocks of text to introduce lore, and that my players had the resources to engage with the combat system. Example: https://docs.google.com/document/d/10uZrm72-Sd6_CAA0L8tWetBnomVZqw9Bw2QHuetI2zA/edit?usp=sharing I recognize that there are probably errors in that document. Feedback is appreciated. Try to see all the newness through a new player's lens!

Cattle Raid spoilers to follow.

 My players chose from among a pre-selected sub set of the starters. I included the complete rules text of every one of their spirit and rune spells, including the stat for the rune they were associated with next to it. The goal being to not have to flip through a book or packet in order to know what they could do. I began by reading the "blurb" at the start of the QuickStart and added in some specific information about the Dragonrise. My players were really interested in the in media res aspect of starting with a cataclysmic event.

I began by just having them walking through Apple Lane and seeing a sign advertising the need for a group of heroquesters to protect local cattle. This was a good opportunity to emphasize some culture of Glorantha and I had them make some culture and homeland rolls. The fruits of these rolls were gaining some reasons as to why their characters would want to take risks to protect cows. I tied these reasons to their passions as well, particularly loyalty and devotion to temples. This provided a further opportunity to talk about passions and augmentation.

I introduced Brightflower, who served as a strong intro NPC to give them further reasons to help. I also used this as an opportunity for them to introduce their characters using the italic text on the sheets. Brightflower played off of each one after they gave their little speech and I used her as a vehicle to give the players some insights into the motivations of their characters, given how new everything was.

The big challenge of the first adventure of a brand new game is that players really don't even know what questions to ask. So, as GM, my job becomes finding creative ways to feed them information from the adventure text questions, without it seeming canned. I think I did a good job of bringing up some things to get them thinking. They took the job and suggesting bothering after Brightflower offered the 50 Lunar. They lead with room and board as an add-on, but Brightflower was so impressed with their Critical success roll on Bargain that she upped the sakkar fee to 100 Lunar.

She fetched Heotarl (who I nickname Tarl, because I find Heortarl awkward to pronounce) and they set off for the Gejay Hills!

I portrayed Heortarl as written in the text, being a bit overeager towards heroquesting. I went and had him express marriage interest in one of the Adventurers as a way to introduce the "forwardness" of Glorantha social custom. My players did a great job of playing off of what I was doing. I was able to include in the information that Heortarl is designed to give the players about ignorance of the ruins, as well as setting up the Orlevings as an antagonist.

Upon arrival at the herd, I used Jareena as a counterpoint to Heortarl, with her chiding him for his "frequent proposals" to young women. One of my player's played Nathem and asked if she could send her Shadowcat on a scouting mission. I wasn't sure how to play this, given that I don't know the extent to which trained Shadowcat's "follow orders" like familiars in DND. So, I had her roll Nathem's Beast Rune. She got a regular success, which I deemed as not good enough for the Cat to go wandering off away from the safety of the fire. I wasn't trying to say "no," so much as do what I thought was realistic. I also wasn't interested in her losing her shadowcat by it just being eaten by sakkars, although maybe that was the most exciting play. Let me know what you think about that?

The group followed the cattle the next day, as written. My players made judicious use of Scan and Search to find some sakkar scat. One of my players rolled Critical on Scan and noted a significant rustling in the grass right before the sakkars attacked.

Cattle Raid suggests that the sakkars don't want to fight humans. While I totally understand that from a Runequest flavor perspective, I was getting the impression that my group was ready for action, and it was starting to get late anyway. So, I elected to have them fight to the death.  Here is the map I prepared for the encounter. Solid lines are increasing elevation and dashed lines are decreasing. The X is where the sakkar attack occurred, and the circled letters refer to the herders. T is HeorTarl.

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I asked the players how they planned to move with the herd and they elected to spread out. I deliberately made the scale large to increase the tension. I also made a point to emphasize with them that the down slope towards the upper left of the diagram leads to Orleving farm lands. My players did discover that the Varmandi had been grazing within Orleving boarder stone boundaries prior to this. This close proximity made them appropriately nervous.

The sakkars attacked! My plan was to keep them near the kills and to feed on them, until anyone chose to intervene. With my players being spread our over the whole map, the challenge was getting them involved with combat and not be sidelined just because of positioning. Vostor was the only one close to the attack, and he elected to use his javelin as a melee weapon. A big part of this first combat was players figuring out "how this works" and I think they did a fine job given the newness and circumstances. They did a good job of attempting augments with skills like bargain, homeland, culture, etc, but really struggled with the idea of augmenting weapon attacks. This is my fault because I could have done a better job of emphasizing that weapons could be augmented too! The "it is whatever it says on my character sheet" mentality is potentially a barrier for people coming over from other games, because skill augmentation is pretty novel for most role-players.

Mobility was the most commonly used Spirit Magic and the player playing Yanioth was absolutely dead set on making the biggest Earth Elemental possible to deal with the threat of the sakkars and I couldn't blame them. ;)

The beginning of the combat was a brief introduction to how Strike Rank works and the logic of it was well-received by my players. The first few rounds were largely positioning rounds and getting out of the way of cattle. I had the cattle split into three main groups, and having the map really helped here. Players really had a lot of positioning choice and many of them were adept at "finding the gaps" between the three groups to avoid being trampled. Everyone had to make at least one DEX roll and nobody was trampled! But the THREAT of the trample played out really well and definitely influenced the sense of threat.

Vostor immediately took a savage gut swipe to his abdomen from the big male sakkar. 17 points to that one location! I basically was fudgy on the movement rules during this section. I recognized that the scale I provided for the map was perhaps a little too much on the harsh side for the combat, as some players were starting hundreds of meters away from the battle. They used Mobility and full moves to get there as quickly as possible. On the other side of the coin, I recognized immediately that I had set it up risking a lot of players just being straight up irrelevant in the battle. Which is not a good thing. So, that resulted in some generous movement responses to player decisions. I didn't play it perfectly by the numbers, because if I did, it really would have punished some players who basically made the logical choice to protect on all sides.

That said, Harmast was close enough to Vostor to be able to get to him with a healing potion. We did the Strike Ranks accurately (Dropped weapon, 5 SR take out potion, 5 SR administer) but I did fudge the movement a little.

With mobility, Vasana and Yanioth were able to cross the field and get to the threat by the fourth round. Yanioth dropped all four of her Rune points to make a medium elemental and used it to engulf the female sakkar. Vasana trampled it's head with her Bison, killing it. Harmast made a special success sword attack against a failed parry of the male sakkar and it went to the head! It didn't quite do triple damage to the head, but given that it was at less than zero main hit points, I called it a beheading.

Where was Nameth this whole time? Nameth ran after Heortarl to guard against any shenanigans with the Orlevings. I had Nameth see two riders in the distance. She (the player) grappled Heortarl to prevent him from doing anything stupid. She wasn't able to wrestle him to the ground. Deseros and Erlanda approached and I played out the expected threats between them and Heortarl. Kari did a great job of rune and passion augments to bargain with them. With a great speech, a logical augment, and a good roll, she talked them into only taking half of the cattle from this sub herd!

So, all told, the group only lost 18 cattle and managed to eliminate the sakkar threat. Yes, I know that cuts across the "sakkar run" tactic of the scenario, but based upon the combination of time, table feel, and this being their first adventure, I felt that it was appropriate to have a longer fight. Even if that cuts against the "monsters and people flee" rule of Runequest. We did get the cultural thing in at the end with Nameth and the Orlevings and the negotiation.

Most importantly, they want to play again. So, the current plan is to play Defending Apple Lane for our next session!

Questions:

1) What do you think about the Shadowcat situation above? Do Shadowcats "follow orders" like familiars? Whether they can or not, how would you have avoided an effective "no" under that situation?

2) Is an elemental's damage physical or magical damage? In other words, does Armor apply? I wasn't sure in the moment, so I made it physical, with the hope being that Yanioth would roll a 4, 5, or 6 on its damage to overcome armor. She rolled a five, and it was appropriately epic, but I'm wondering if I played it correctly. It just seems odd to me that you'd drop four rune points to control an elemental, roll a two for damage result when it engulfs, and have the elemental do no damage to a foe with armor. Seems a potentially huge waste of a large rune point investment.

3) I wasn't sure how creatures with natural weapons "parry," so I just used their claw statistic. Correct?

4) Any skill not in any NPCs list happens at base value, correct? The biggest aide that was missing was a list of skill base values, and I will have that for the next session.

Thanks for reading!



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Most importantly, they want to play again.

Excellent! Having fun and wanted to play again are really the most important aspects.

Sounds like it all played out well. I think you found, like most GM's of RQG do, not to worry too much about the movement. Narrative/story flow is more important than simulation.

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1) What do you think about the Shadowcat situation above? Do Shadowcats "follow orders" like familiars? Whether they can or not, how would you have avoided an effective "no" under that situation?

Seems reasonable. Unless the shadowcat had an awakened/allied spirit (effectively a familiar), then it's a normal animal, trained to some degree. Use of the Beast Rune to communicate the command works fine.  With a regular success, I probably would have sent the shadowcat off, and then had it come hightailing back. But given the unusual situation (and likely Sakkar scent), not having the shadowcat go off at command also works.

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2) Is an elemental's damage physical or magical damage?

Earth elemental's damage is physical (basically it's a crushing attack). Armor should have the opportunity to protect, but it certainly can immobilize the target too.

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3) I wasn't sure how creatures with natural weapons "parry," so I just used their claw statistic. Correct?

Correct.

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4) Any skill not in any NPCs list happens at base value, correct? The biggest aide that was missing was a list of skill base values, and I will have that for the next session.

That's the easiest approach and works fine. You could check against cultural/occupation modifiers to ensure it seems reasonable, but I wouldn't go out of the way to do so.

 

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Sounds as though you had a good session and everyone enjoyed it.

For some reason, I couldn't quote things, so had to cheat.

 

3 hours ago, klecser said:

1) What do you think about the Shadowcat situation above? Do Shadowcats "follow orders" like familiars? Whether they can or not, how would you have avoided an effective "no" under that situation?

It depends on what the Player thinks the Shadowcat is, really.

If it is a trained beast that can go off on its own on forays, then I'd say that a successful Beast Rune roll would be OK for it to do that. However, I'd limit what it could do to its INT in basic commands.

If it is just a pet, then a critical Beast Rune roll would probably be needed.

If it is a familiar, or awakened Shadow cat, then it is effectively an NPC and can be sent off on its own.

As for the issue raised in the writeup, about becoming Sakkar-fodder, you could do it in several ways, if the Shadow cat encounters a Sakkar:

  1. Have the Sakkar eat the Shadow Cat without the PC knowing what had happened
  2. Have the Sakkar chase the Shadow Cat into a hole/up a tree, for the PC to have to go and find the Shadow Cat, hopefully when the Sakkar is not around
  3. Have the Sakkar chase the Shadow Cat as it runs back to the PC, followed by a Sakkar
  4. Have the Shadow Cat avoid being noticed by the Sakkar and return to tell the PC where the Sakkar is
  5. Have the Shadow Cat ambush the Sakkar, jumping on it and clawing it to death from surprise

I would avoid 1 and 5, but any of 2-4 should be reasonable.

 

3 hours ago, klecser said:

2) Is an elemental's damage physical or magical damage? In other words, does Armor apply? I wasn't sure in the moment, so I made it physical, with the hope being that Yanioth would roll a 4, 5, or 6 on its damage to overcome armor. She rolled a five, and it was appropriately epic, but I'm wondering if I played it correctly. It just seems odd to me that you'd drop four rune points to control an elemental, roll a two for damage result when it engulfs, and have the elemental do no damage to a foe with armor. Seems a potentially huge waste of a large rune point investment.

From RQ2 memory, as I haven't memorised RQG Elementals:

  • Earth Elementals deal physical damage, so armour protects. Typically, they open up a pit and grab the opponent, smashing it as the pit closes.
  • Fire Elementals deal magical damage, although it is physical fire it attacks General Hit Points. In RQ2 Armour didn't protect, but spells did (Shield/Protection)
  • Water Elementals attack by drowning, so forcing their way into your mouth/nose and into your lungs, so armour wouldn't protect
  • Air Elementals pick you up and toss you, so you receive physical falling damage, so armour protects (Maybe you have to make a Luck Roll, I can't remember)
  • Darkness Elementals attacked with a claw in RQ2, so armour protected from that, they also dealt cold damage and armour didn;t protect from that, but their main attack is Fearshock.

 

3 hours ago, klecser said:

3) I wasn't sure how creatures with natural weapons "parry," so I just used their claw statistic. Correct?

That's what I would do.

3 hours ago, klecser said:

4) Any skill not in any NPCs list happens at base value, correct? The biggest aide that was missing was a list of skill base values, and I will have that for the next session.

There are several ways of handling this:

  1. The NPC hasn't got the skill listed, so hasn't got the skill, so uses the basic chance
  2. The NPC has a general skill (Fighter 50% or Scout 60%) and you just use that default value for non-listed and appropriate skills
  3. The NPC has a general skill (Fighter 50%, Scout 60%) and you just use the appropriate default value for non-listed skills

I prefer approach 3, personally, so I could have an NPC with Wizard 60%, Fighter 50% and Hunter 70%.

 

 

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12 minutes ago, soltakss said:

That's what I would do.

There are several ways of handling this:

  1. The NPC hasn't got the skill listed, so hasn't got the skill, so uses the basic chance
  2. The NPC has a general skill (Fighter 50% or Scout 60%) and you just use that default value for non-listed and appropriate skills
  3. The NPC has a general skill (Fighter 50%, Scout 60%) and you just use the appropriate default value for non-listed skills

I prefer approach 3, personally, so I could have an NPC with Wizard 60%, Fighter 50% and Hunter 70%.

I use a generic 50 for skills that I need for Call of Cthulhu so those options make total sense to me.

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I mostly don't allow animals (ordinary non-sentient beasts) to "parry" as such.  I do allow a dodge.

After you hit them once or twice, they figure out that the  hitty-thing  hurts.  If it hurt a LOT, they'll try to dodge.  If it only hurt for 1-3(ish) HP's of damage, their version of 
"Parry" is to BITE it, like it was the swipe of another animal's paw, or something.  In the wild, this is a very effective strategy.

However, this amounts -- more or less -- to sticking their head in the way of the Adventurers' weapon.  😨

Granted, they meet the blow fangs-first -- and the sakkar, IIRC, has some pretty serious fangs! -- but it's generally not a winning strategy vs. armed humans carrying weapons to get through the armor of human foes...

 

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Most weapons (with the exception of swords) have quite a lot of non-business parts that can be "attacked" in order to deflect a bow. Spear and axe shafts, or the arm of a knife fighter are within reach of the parrying party.

Cats of all sizes and bears will use their paws to strike attacking limbs, and may well be able to go for the flat of a blade, too. Only dogs are predominantly head attackers, and even they will use their forepaws to hold down thrashing prey (parrying hoofed kicks).

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1) What do you think about the Shadowcat situation above? Do Shadowcats "follow orders" like familiars? Whether they can or not, how would you have avoided an effective "no" under that situation?

Shadowcats are doglike in their trainability.  I'd allow a well-trained dog to do a scout-and-report, within limits.  As Soltakss says, limit it to INT "tricks," if they're complex, dangerous, or otherwise difficult-to-train.  I'd let it do a "Trick" on any relevant roll -- Beast Rune, animal-handling, animal-lore, etc.

In-game, you've established that "scout-and-report" is not one of the Tricks it knows; if Nathem is a Player's character, I'd allow him to work on training his shadowcat to do this (I'd expect it to take months of dedicated effort; at least 10 training sessions every week for at least 2ish hours/session (normally I'd do 1h sessions, but not for outdoor/exploration tasks).).

Use communication via Beast Rune (or spell) for other things.

On the ordinary success achieved in-game, I'd probably have been a bit more generous, but I'm gonna call that a simple difference of opinion, not that your choice was "wrong."

I'd have had the Alynx understand Nathem wanted it to go "look around out thata-way," and rolled 3d6ish for 10-meter range-increment it went (30m-180m(ish)) & a bit of randomizing for precise direction and for straight-line vs meandering.  Without a trained Trick, I'd default to the cat only having 2 reports available:  "Found some prey - lets go hunt!" (n.b. cattle are not valid "prey") or "oh HELL no -- that's dangerous.  don't go hunting THAT way!"

===

About those "limits" (within which a critter's scout-and-report are limited):  the most-limited bit is the "report" of course.  How well do you read the animal's body-language?  How sophisticated is its mind, how much can it grasp, to even attempt to convey?  I would call for a separate roll to UNDERSTAND the report.

I'd disallow any "count" info beyond one/some/lots... and any particularly-scary-to-the-animal threat might register as "lots" of threat, regardless of count!  It can't really convey species, etc.

That said, wild animal groups have been documented with different threat-signals for "hawk" (animals take cover vs threat from above; large-enough ones only "take caution" and don't take cover) & "poison snake" (animals look at the ground, avoid dense undergrowth) & "Big Cat" (animals look for trees to climb, avoid big-cat-cover), etc.  I'd allow them to also specifically be able to signal "human" and maybe 1-2 other specific creatures (hounds can be trained to hunt specific species).

Complex situations are beyond their ability to convey.  A mixed party of humans & trolls, mounted on bison, bolo-lizards & beetles, with packs of hounds & trollkin?  Your report will translate roughly as:  "It's a booshgobbldyfrake.  Big one.  Let's run away."

===

IIRC, Nathem's shadowcat does NOT house any allied-spirit / etc.  So it's an ordinary beast.  As others have noted, a spirit will give it a mind, make it effectively an NPC like any other.

Edited by g33k
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2 hours ago, Joerg said:

Most weapons (with the exception of swords) have quite a lot of non-business parts that can be "attacked" in order to deflect a bow. Spear and axe shafts, or the arm of a knife fighter are within reach of the parrying party.

Cats of all sizes and bears will use their paws to strike attacking limbs, and may well be able to go for the flat of a blade, too. Only dogs are predominantly head attackers, and even they will use their forepaws to hold down thrashing prey (parrying hoofed kicks).

I'm unconvinced; you seem to be implying more cognizance and combat-savvy than I'd expect from a wild animal... going for the flat of the blade??!?

 

A haft is still a heavy piece of hardwood; even not striking the weapon-head, it's still roughly a d8 Quarterstaff!

I agree that a knife, even a shortword/handaxe, puts the weapon-bearing hand and forearm in reach.  Granted, the haft is less-damaging than the head.  But particularly a thrust, like a spear... I wouldn't expect a beast to let the nearest bit get close while it reached around to the bit behind!

Obviously, almost any weirdness could crop up in a wild melee.

 

But an out-and-out "parry" is -- mostly -- an intelligent trained response.

I've seen a cat try to claw at objects, you're right -- they do use their paws that way.  But when I see cats actually FIGHT, they mostly go for each others heads/shoulders (with a rear-leg rake if they get 2 good clawfulls at the front).  I've seen a sort of "guard pattern:"  one paw high/wide, threatening and possibly doing a series of fast swipes, sort of interdicting a vector-of-attack & threatening a Big Hit if ignored.

But preferentially striking each others paws, "block" style?  Not much, not really.  Sometimes a cat will get a claw "stuck" in their foe; the victim doesn't even use a paw to knock the (static, unmoving) limb off them.

I have been known to "kitty duel" if the cat seems like it's in WildBeast mode -- my speed vs. theirs -- to go for a lightning-fast tummy-pat, paw-tap, jaw-scritch, etc.  If I've mis-judged the cats mood, it leaves; but often it stays to play a game for a minute or several... (and yes, it gets me scratched sometimes; not all cats play that game with velvet paws! (I figure it's my fault if I get hurt, not theirs).  And sometimes instead of bloodsport, it turns out the cat was into cuddles&scritches&purring; and that's good, too!  (The one cat who liked to purr & nuzzle WHILE ripping at me and drawing blood... OK, that was a bit creepy...))

They are clearly treating my hand as the "attacker" (they ignore everything past the wrist (except an occasional claw/claw/bite&Rake, when I've been REALLY slow...)).  They'll nail a finger if they get it, but what they're aiming for is the whole hand.  But the closest I've seen to a "parry" (from "duelling" a dozen so so cats (not all cats are interested & willing; and some don't see the "game" in it)) is more like a "trap" from martial arts -- a hook-and-draw-in motion (taking advantage of those curved, ripping claws), not so much "blocking" my finger as trying to grab it to bring the "body" of my hand in for the kill...

===

I haven't seen as much of bears -- never owned one, pet-sit one, visited other owners, etc -- but from what I've seen they too do little to "parry" -- when they reach out a paw in a fight, it's to HIT (or to threaten).

Bears will swipe, but not really paw-v-paw "parry" -- a meaningful blow is to the head/body, not an opposing paw.  They mostly try to hit PAST the paw, and defend by biting an incoming paw (Paw meets Jaw is usually worse for the bitten paw!).

 

If an animal was intelligent -- awakened, or with a Spirit inside -- then all manner of good tactical and strategic options open up, including parries.

Even a good trainer might be able to elicit non-instinctive combat mannerisms.

 

But for wild animals, I'm gonna stick with my "mostly no parries" rule, unless I see pretty convincing arguments (or video?) otherwise.  I can probably find youtube vid to support most of my points, if you'd like.

 

Edited by g33k

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3 hours ago, g33k said:

I have been known to "kitty duel" if the cat seems like it's in WildBeast mode -- my speed vs. theirs -- to go for a lightning-fast tummy-pat, paw-tap, jaw-scritch, etc.  If I've mis-judged the cats mood, it leaves; but often it stays to play a game for a minute or several... (and yes, it gets me scratched sometimes; not all cats play that game with velvet paws! (I figure it's my fault if I get hurt, not theirs).  And sometimes instead of bloodsport, it turns out the cat was into cuddles&scritches&purring; and that's good, too!  (The one cat who liked to purr & nuzzle WHILE ripping at me and drawing blood... OK, that was a bit creepy...))

They are clearly treating my hand as the "attacker" (they ignore everything past the wrist (except an occasional claw/claw/bite&Rake, when I've been REALLY slow...)).  They'll nail a finger if they get it, but what they're aiming for is the whole hand.  But the closest I've seen to a "parry" (from "duelling" a dozen so so cats (not all cats are interested & willing; and some don't see the "game" in it)) is more like a "trap" from martial arts -- a hook-and-draw-in motion (taking advantage of those curved, ripping claws), not so much "blocking" my finger as trying to grab it to bring the "body" of my hand in for the kill...

Yes, against larger opponents (let's say house cat vs. German shepherd) the cat uses dodge and lightning strikes, but it doesn't strike at the jaw, but the top of the nose. That's what makes me think that it will recognize the business end of the attacker and avoid it.

One former cat of ours came to us rather young, and accepted a plush hand puppet of a badger as mock-sibling, reducing the danger of drawing blood significantly (but also my reach). Against a smaller opponent, the instinct to dodge is lesser, and if you scale up to sakkar size, humans qualify as smaller prey.

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I liked your Combat 101 document.  A couple of comments:

  • Statement of Intent.  I have always done the statements in INT order(lowest to highest ) That gives the players with characters that have higher INT a bit more info to base their actions on.
  • Movement/attacks. You can only attack twice with a melee weapon if your skill is 100% or higher, AND you have enough  strike ranks. And each attack is at 1/2 your base attack skill.  I have played that spells cast on the weapon( ie Bladesharp ) have their modifiers added AFTER splitting, while spells cast on the person( ie Sword Trance ) have their modifiers added BEFORE splitting.  Its the skill before splitting that has to be 100% or higher. One exception to needing 100% or higher is missile weapons with a Rate of S/MR. With those, you use your full skill for every attack, and can attack as many times as you have strike ranks for.  More below

In your Action/Strike Ranks table, one error is that missile weapons don't have a strike rank, so those attacks are on the character's DEX SR.  Shooting a weapon with a rate of S/MR, and a low enough DEX SR, you can attack multiple times per round.  So

  • DEX SR 2, Weapon ready to fire at the start of the round( arrow knocked )
    • First round, First shot at SR 2
    • Load weapon, ready to go at SR 7( +5 SR )
    • Second shot at SR 9.
    • No time to reload this round
    • Second round, weapon loaded at SR 5
    • First shot at SR 7
    • Weapon reloaded at SR 12 (+5 SR)
  • DEX SR 1, Weapon ready to fire at the start of the round
    • First shot SR 1.
    • Load weapon, ready to go at SR 6
    • Second shot at SR 7
    • Load weapon, ready to go at SR 12
  • DEX SR 1, Weapon not ready to fire at the start of the round
    • Load, ready to go at SR 5
    • First shot, SR 6
    • Load, ready to go at SR 11
    • Second shot, SR 12

With a DEX SR of 0, it works out basically the same as a DEX SR of 1, except that, if you're ready at the start of the round, you can get 3 shots off in the first round.

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