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Nikoli

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About Nikoli

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    Member

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  • RPG Biography
    I'm a roleplayer since the 80s, beginning first with MERP, Rolemaster, then Warhammer, and having by now played many of the classic games. This includes lots of CoC, some Pendragon, lots of Vampire the Masquerade, a little Werewolf, lots of Warhammer (1st and 2nd edition), Shadowrun (great world, painful system), WEG Star Wars (D6 - a real favourite), probably two games of D&D(!) - because MERP spoiled me - and some others. I'm currently looking for a good system for Warhammer, which has led me to BRP variants.
  • Current games
    I'm reading Zweihander at the moment, in my quest for a Warhammer system that works for both the players AND the GM. (Ease, yet detailed and flowing.) I'm thinking of buying Magic World.
  • Location
    Ireland
  • Blurb
    I teach psychology, hypnotize people, and take a serious interest in philosophy.
  1. Nikoli

    BRP Ravenloft

    Hi, This looks great. I can't seem to find the BRP Ravenloft in the downloads or on Chaot's page. Is it gone? Thanks in advance! Nikoli
  2. Nikoli

    Different Magic Systems for MW?

    Hi, I neglected to add that the specialisations of Deep Magic would also develop after 101%, so they enter with 2 as usual, but gain an extra 1 per 25%. So the knowledge for spell creation develops, too. Likely the base damage/healing will need to be scalled to POW divided by 4 and perhaps Arcane Lore divided by 25, rather than MP, since the latter reduces as specialisation increases. So the base damage can be the die type suggested by the base manipulations possible to any magic user. But manipulations proper can still occur after casting the spell. Here we are concerned with the base level. Again, this may need tweaking; by adding a casting roll of -10% per manipulation, I think we can balance it. Reading these tomes, in CoC, took several months, so it takes time for lores to rise. I would not allow experience checks for lores. Only research. Such books are extremely valuable, awkward/heavy, and require time to study. Finding one on an adventure becomes a source of wonder and danger. They now must be read, too, prior to accessing their spell content, which are learned separately, too. Nikoli
  3. Nikoli

    Different Magic Systems for MW?

    Hi, I've been on a rather epic (but lazy) quest: the quest to find the right kind of magic system to port into or develop for MW. I'm thinking WFRP 1e spells, but I quite like some of the RQIII flexibility (I bought the deluxe single softback, and also have the GW hardbacks - I find the older editions more evocative; maybe because the art reminds me of classic wfrp, one of the first games I played). I see MW has my base for translating other BRP-related goodies/ideas into. I decided that I like magic users having some skill tied to their abilities, so that they feel a sense of progression, just like a player of a warrior might grow attached to seeing their weapon skill rise. I figured Arcane Lore would serve as both a knowledge roll and a casting roll, if such a roll is desired. I wanted to also include spell manipulation, but as a single skill, similar to Legend/MRQII. I felt these latter games got closest to the kind of BRP system for magic that felt best for me: streamlined and elegant, mostly. Especially when it came to manipulation. (Separate skills for duration, for example, just leaves me cold.) Using the advanced sorcery idea of deep magic's rule of 4, I figured that the inherent manipulation possibile could be a function of POW divided by 4 plus every 25% of Arcane Lore (25, 50, 75, 100, etc). So, a magic user of POW 20 and 101% Arcane Lore could manipulate their spells for 9 points worth. I figure that using Arcane Lore, also with raw POW, in this way would introduce the CoC dynamic where ancient tomes become sought after. It also explains why a library of great magic books can be a source of tremendous power. As in CoC, reading such books will bestow a bonus to the lore skill, and darker tomes may also receive a bonus to Dark/Blasphemous Lore. (I would add Arcane Lore, Dark Lore, and Academic Lore as skills, along with a Divine Lore for clerics. Academic Lore would be general history, astronomy, etc., while Dark Lore would be demons, necromancy, etc. So a few comprehensive, streamlined skills. I'd allow academic/magic users to take two extra skills with their profession. I'd start Dark Lore for such characters at a base of their chosen Shadow allegiance, due to reading, exposure, Faustian temptation, etc.) Dark Lore will add a dangerous twist to reading some discovered tomes or grimoires. I am currently thinking of a less dangerous Cthulhu Mythos mechanic, since in fantasy a wizard might know something of the dark (like Gandalf) without being utterly mind-blasted because of it! Maybe 1/5th of dark/blashephemous lore is taken from a max SAN characteristic....and added also to Chaos/Shadow allegiance...but I digress. My main aim is to give wizards an adventuring rationale not just tied to spells in grimoires, but to the knowledge of magic itself, which in turn has a real game effect via increasing manipulation and more (see later). I currently think that perhaps Int times 20 is the maximum for any Lore skill level, so a wizard of 17 Int could get their lore up to 340%. That would prevent the most powerful wizard being simply the one with the biggest library! (But books DO matter. A very important tome might confer as much as 2D10 to Arcane Lore after studying. I'd use CoC scales. Dark forces would kill for such a book, and not just because of the spells it contains.) Lastly, tied also to Arcane Lore, once a character gets 101%, I figured that Deep Magic, as presented, can be used to DESIGN personal spells. (If you still like relatively fixed spells. I do, for most settings anyways.) So now the magic user can create their own spells. Or perhaps enchant items. And all tied to their increasing knowledge of magic. Each magic point used is -10% for the arcane lore spell creation roll. The player devises the effect, the name, and with the GM, the final creation roll and time is decided. (A day or a week per magic point? Depends on how much a GM wants new spells.) We now have a good system for spell design! For damage, each GM would need to scale. Our POW 20, Arcane Lore 101% wizard above could do 9 manipulations to the final spell after creation, so for base damage (before such manipulations) perhaps a function of the invested MP, so D6 plus 1 (7) or D8 plus 1 (9). Then a manipulation after might be scaled like the demon effects (1 is an extra d2, 3 a d6, etc.) I'm less sure here. To help balance such power, perhaps an Arcane Roll to cast would be useful here, with a casting roll of minus 10% per spell manipulation. That way, great power is really only in the hands, for a while, of very learned magic users with a high lore skill to offset such powerful magics. Once again, a high lore skill becomes a major adventuring goal and also rationale for NPC power. That ancient 1000-year-old wizard is a force to be reckoned with, if he has a lore skill of 340%! He can manipulate his spells (if we imagine a POW of 30, he can do 20 manipulations in total!, and still succeed, since a 00 is the only way he'll fail. (340% equals 13 manipulations, from 13 times 25, and POW 30 equals 7, via 7 times 4. His casting roll is minus 200%, so he still has 140%! Ouch. His combined power could equal a damage spell similar to a small bomb. Like Saruman, he could blow a hole in a castle or fortress wall, or perhaps a dragon, if he desired. But still at significant MP expenditure. He's dangerous, but not unstoppable.) So, the above are just ideas. Perhaps at 200% Arcane Lore a wizard can use Deep Magic now on the fly, rather than just in research. (Or 200% is enchanting items via Deep Magic, and then 300% is fully freeform Deep Magic.) Truly, such knowledge of Arcane Lore leads to both terrors and wonders! Any thoughts are appreciated! Nikoli
  4. Nikoli

    ZWEIHÄNDER

    I played wfrp 1 and 2, and have Zweihander. (Z) I've yet to read it all. My issue is that it has great ideas, but that it seems a little too gamey for combat. (I'm not a fan of maneuvres, etc., at variable action points. I don't like how Z feels at present as I simulate combat in my mind while reading it. Seems clunky.) I ended up getting Magic World as it was elegant and quick as a GM, but also as a way to introduce new players. But I imagine I'll take ideas from Zweihander, like the 'flip to succeed' mechanic. (E.g., if advantaged, you can read either d10 as the tens when you roll under.) The professions have nifty unique abilities, too, which can be ported over. My aim right now is to use Magic World in Warhammer. It's easy to model The Enemy Within campaign, I find, with Magic World/BRP. Including NPCs. Zweihander is interesting, and I'm still reading it (!), but it seems a lot of work for all involved. It's more complicated than wfrp 1 and 2, but in a way that seems awkward at present. (It made me miss the simple elegance of wfrp 1, yet that's what it was a homage to. I eventually discovered that BRP/Magic World/Runequest III can recreate warhammer more easily, but with the realism I want and freedom from rigid percentile limits.) I may change my mind in the near future. Zweihander is certainly an interesting tome, but a demanding read. I'm still following it and related publications (like the tarot-sized spell cards) with interest. Nikoli
  5. Nikoli

    Experience Checks

    With Magic World, does anyone award the automatic increase suggested in the book? I'm wary of it. But then again, if skills can go over 100% as a new metric for increasing mastery, maybe it's okay? (I noticed in a runequest adventure a cook with cooking over 100%!) I can't shake the feeling that it might be too much to allow as an automatic increase, even just to keep the mystique of getting beyond 100. I like it being a really difficult, yet incredible, moment to reach. (I'd probably limit starting skills to 75% or 80% max. I'd allow 90% for mastery, and then multiple attacks similar to the -30 defense rule appear at that point, but arete after 100%. I'd see it like chess: master at 90%, grandmaster at 100%, and then there are great grandmasters...Kasparov is in a whole other chess league! 150% plus. In chess they call them SuperGMs.)
  6. Nikoli

    Frequency of Experience Rolls

    The xp is mainly to keep the feel of wfrp for players of wfrp. Or maybe even just for me as a GM handing out a little something at the end. I don't do xp by any dnd encounter method; just 100 xp per session, on average. So a reroll seems ideal for me with BRP. I like the blend of the system looking after the advancement, in BRP, along with a little treat per session. Even if the experiences rolls are not every session, every session a player is gaining a reroll for the experience rolls they are earning for later.
  7. Nikoli

    Riposte in Magic World

    Hi, I read people discussing dodge and when and why it might be of benefit, such as for elves, to use over parry. People seemed to have issues with it in comparison to parry. To help, I'd allow a special or critical dodge to create a riposte opportunity...only, naturally, you can now use the primary weapon. Therefore, even if armed with just a sword, a special dodge would allow a riposte. No more does the shield or two-handed weapon user have sole enjoyment of the counterattack! Another issue on dodges (in the realm of ripostes and defence!), is that Magic World seems vague as to whether a parry followed by a dodge results in the dodge having a minus 30% to its roll. I was initially going to split them as independent, each with their own reductions on multiple use, when I read some of the issues people had around dodge being somewhat neglected. But then I felt there was maybe a workaround. I think, that as a parry can't be used twice against a single attack, naturally, and to make dodge of more importance, a dodge (full percentile) followed by a parry (- 30%) could be used on a single attack. So, two lines of defence. But, importantly, NOT a parry followed by a dodge. The reason is you can move and then interpose, if moving wasn't enough, but if you fail to interpose, you get hit. So in brief, dodge can allow a single-weapon user to riposte/counterattack AND can be used prior to parry against a single attack, but the following parry suffers the -30. This makes dodge of importance in the combat economy along with parry as, I think, it should be. A persom of 40% dodge and 70% parry could parry for 70%, or they could both dodge and then parry at 40%. Dodge, too, can suffer armour penalties, I believe, so now no armour warriors can get some benefit from the 'fast and natural' style. Any thoughts? This is mainly around the whole issue of defence, including ripostes. I'm sure about my own use of dodging allowing a riposte as good for my game, but I'm less certain, without testing, of the two lines of defence idea. Nikoli Edit: If the attacker gets a special and the defender gets a normal successful dodge, there are maybe two options: allow the subsequent parry to futher reduce the attack value to a normal failure. I.e., if a critical attack was rolled, a successful dodge would make it special and then a successful parry would make it a normal success. Or, secondly, and maybe better as it's less powerful, do an independant dodge and parry and take the best of the two, assuming the player doesn't accept the first dodge roll as sufficient. So if the dodge reduced an attack to special, but the parry was a special and reduced it to a normal success, the player can take the parry result as it was better. That seems much better than the first option, which is too powerful in combination.
  8. Nikoli

    Experience Checks

    Thanks. And interesting idea on the fumble. That might even be worth an experience roll with a bonus! I'm more curious how frequently people award the experience checks, and if they tick on a success, a special success, or at some other point? In play, the reason for an INT limit is to maybe prevent players rushing to use every skill haphazardly simply to get a tick. This seems an issue other people mentioned, so I want to nip these things in the bud prior to a campaign. I'm sure I used to play CoC with ticks at the end of an adventure, so maybe two or three sessions, but maybe it morphed over time to each session? I can't recall, now.
  9. Nikoli

    Frequency of Experience Rolls

    I've always loved the elegance of the CoC mechanic of rolling over, since it controls inflation and power gaming by itself. (I'm rather new to the general BRP and the extra options - I never even knew of them, and yet I had Cthulhu Dark Ages, etc., and always wondered why Chaosium never developed a better combat system - turns out, they did!) But I also love experience points, and feel some room for them is needed. As I was doing wfrp, I was thinking of the usual 100 xp per session, but now they could be percentile pluses added to experience rolls. E.g., a player might use +25% of his 100% to add to a roll. Magic World allows for an automatic professional skill increase, which I'm wary of, so I'm also wary of allowing 100% on to a single skill. Hmmm. Actually, now that I think of it, the 100 can be a d100. I.e., they get an extra experience roll over and above their normal INT limit. (Assuming I use that limit.) I think that's ideal. (For me.) For anyone's normal game, this could be a reroll to a failed experience roll. So, a player with 200xp would have two rerolls to use should they fail an important and valued experience check. I don't think I'd require training time in-game also, as it wasn't a facet of old wfrp and it would change the feel too much, me thinks. I like the training rules separate. I actually did an M.Sc. in the psychology of expertise, and most of the gains for people, like chess players, occur within tournaments. Real-time feedback is essential. I feel the current system simulates that nicely, though adding in reflection and/or other training is a nice touch depending on the setting and general feel of the game. (With combat, sparring is key, so it's definitely got a place in a simulationist game.) So it seems most people award experience rolls each session? All food for thought. Thanks!
  10. Nikoli

    Different Magic Systems for MW?

    Hi All, I plan to use Magic World for Warhammer, and for that wfrp 1e feel, I've noticed that the warhammer spells work in Magic World with just a little tweaking (e.g., POW resistance rather than WP rolls; I have the hardcopy of Realms of Sorcery 1e, which is awesome). I feel the Warhammer magic system, also with magic points, offers a fully portable system for both wizards and divine magic. First edition with Realms of Sorcery is amazing in detail and variety and is fully useable for any general sword and sorcery game. I would use learned spells as individual skills (I've been getting my head around that notion - it's a very different mechanic than I've experienced in a long time!), starting at INT (petty spells at + 50), but allow magic points to enhance a spell roll by 5% per point. (In Warhammer, extra MPs can also enhance the roll against Willpower/POW by 5%, so this fits the resistance table in MW, too.) An alternative I was thinking of is that petty spells start at INT x 5; level 1 at INT x4, lvl 2 at INT x 3, etc. There are 4 levels of spells in wfrp, so INT x 1 for those. I'd still perhaps use the MP boost, but experience checks are only gained if the spell is cast successfuly even if the boost wasn't present. (So it must still roll under to gain an experience check.) Any thoughts? Nikoli P.S. Ingredients could mean an automatic success. Nothing to sniff at in the heat of battle. And now that I think of it, maybe each spell as a skill is too punishing for magic users. Especially as wfrp didn't have it. I might use the general casting level (petty, lvl 1, lvl 2, etc, as separate skills). The first time they learn a spell in a lvl, they get the skill at the corresponding level. But lvl 1 casting ability is gained with a sacrifice of a POW, lvl 2 with 2 POW, etc., to control power and advance. The same for clerics. Alternatively, lore skills (like wizardry) could be tied to entry into lvls, with up to 25% for petty; 50 for lvl 1; 75% lvl 2; 90% lvl 3; 101% lvl 4. PC magic users, in Warhammer, could then start at an apprentice level on the cusp, after perhaps their first adventure, of becoming a real lvl 1 wizard. The Lore advance could trigger 3 spells at each level, pending perhaps the usual rolls and then a POW sacrifice.
  11. Nikoli

    Experience Checks

    Hi All, I was having queries around experience checks, which I posted in the general BRP thread, and was wondering how often experienced Magic World players/GMs use them. (I'm a long-time CoC player, but recently joined the Magic World guild for wfrp roleplaying!) I've heard of 'tick hunting' on these forums, which I haven't encountered in play, such as when people swap weapons just to try and get an experience tick. I recall in old games of CoC that only a special success would get the tick. That way, ticks are always significant, and that way a reward at the end of the session fits, too. I think this phased out of later editions. I was a player in those early days, so I'm not sure now whether this was an old rule. (I've not GM'd or played CoC, though, for many years. I played wfrp for a lonnnnng time, and decided I needed a new, but percentile, system. Searching around led me to Magic World.) In terms of frequency of experience rolls, RQ3 mentions in a table that only 3 ticks are given. (It doesn't say it in the text, but in the hardcover GW version there's a table which limits the ticks.) Extrapolating, whether you use the special tick rule above, you might only allow 3 experience rolls per session. (Perhaps 5 at the end of a whole adventure?) The 3 experience rolls would limit tick hunting, since players will focus on the ticks they want, as would the special tick rule constrain what gets ticked. To avoid players not getting a tick if they never get a special success, the 3 experience rolls seems sufficient if you give ticks for dramatic, yet non-special, use of skills. Maybe changing the numbers so that up to 4 profession skills can be rolled (more even than 3, fitting with the 8 profession skills), and 2 non-profession skills. That way you allow players to grow within their profession, as befits, with some growth outside of it, too. Another and perhaps better option I'm playing around with is to allow experience checks on non-special'd skills, if dramatic, but to limit the number of experience rolls per adventure (or session?) to half their INT characteristic. (Similar to the skill modifiers.) A player with 14 INT could attempt a maximum of 7 experience rolls. If over the course of an adventure, these could be used after a session on successful skills, but the total experience tally of 7 is used up. So if the player fails two experience checks after a session, he has 5 left for the remaining adventure. If this 7 limit (based on an INT of 14) is chosen, one might allow rolls per session, but also allow the tally to be applied several times to a single skill. (This might replace the automatic skill increase in Magic World, as I'm not too comfortable with that.) So, the player could effectively try to increase a skill two or three times, spending his experience tally on retries, but the skill only increases the once. It's a re-roll. Perhaps limit this to 3: three strikes and you're out of luck. That way you avoid players burning all their rolls on an unlucky streak. E.g., if a player only gathered three ticks in a session, he could get up to 3 tries to increase two of them (6 towards his INT 14 tally of 7), and 1 roll to increase the remainder. This would help balance the players who had a lucky session (ticked lots of skills) versus those who didn't (but they get the option to reroll), as the experience tally is a spendable resource. As a result, any tick-hunting players might be constrained. The tally matters if players want to improve the odds of boosting their higher profession skills, rather than just using it to boost low surplus weapon skills, etc., via weapon swapping. A spendable resource makes a player think about the future more! Any thoughts? I kind of like the idea of a spendable resource for rolls per session. Basing it off of INT seems nice, but I'm wary of players whose characters have modest INT suffering in the long-run. But maybe it's realistic, since all the other stats matter significantly. A smart warrior is now quite dangerous in the long-run, too, due to rerolls, which seems fitting. Just some ideas! Nikoli
  12. Nikoli

    Frequency of Experience Rolls

    Hi All, I was having queries around experience checks, too, and was wondering how often experienced BRP players/GMs use them. (I'm a long-time CoC player, but recently joined the Magic World guild for wfrp roleplaying!) The experience/tick hunting is not something I've ever encountered, though. I recall in old games of CoC that only a special success would get the tick. That way, ticks are always significant, and that way a reward at the end of the session fits, too. I think this phased out of later editions. I was a player in those early days, so I'm not sure now whether this was an old rule. (I've not GM'd or played CoC, though, for many years. I played wfrp for a lonnnnng time, and decided I needed a new, but percentile, system. Searching around led me to Magic World.) In terms of frequency of rolls, RQ3 mentions in a table that only 3 ticks are given. (It doesn't say it in the text, but in the hardcover GW version there's a table which limits the ticks.) Extrapolating, whether you use the special tick rule above, you would only allow 3 experience rolls per session. (Perhaps 5 at the end of a whole adventure.) The 3 experience rolls would limit tick hunting, since players will focus on the ticks they want, as would the special tick rule constrain what gets ticked. To avoid players not getting a tick if they never get a special success, the 3 experience rolls seems sufficient if you give ticks for dramatic, yet non-special, use of skills. Maybe changing the numbers so that up to 4 profession skills can be rolled (more even than 3, fitting with the 8 profession skills), and 2 non-profession skills. That way you allow players to grow within their profession, as befits, with some growth outside of it, too. Another and perhaps better option I'm playing around with is to allow experience checks on non-special'd skills, if dramatic, but to limit the number of experience rolls per adventure (or session?) to half their INT characteristic. (Similar to the skill modifiers.) A player with 14 INT could attempt a maximum of 7 experience rolls. If over the course of an adventure, these could be used after a session on successful skills, but the total experience tally of 7 is used up. So if the player fails two experience checks after a session, he has 5 left for the remaining adventure. If this 7 limit (based on an INT of 14) is chosen, one might allow rolls per session, but also allow the tally to be applied several times to a single skill. So, the player could effectively try to increase a skill two or three times, spending his experience tally on retries, but the skill only increases the once. It's a re-roll. Perhaps limit this to 3: three strikes and you're out of luck. That way you avoid players burning all their rolls on an unlucky streak. E.g., if a player only gathered three ticks in a session, he could get up to 3 tries to increase two of them (6 towards his INT 14 tally of 7), and 1 roll to increase the remainder. This would help balance the players who had a lucky session (ticked lots of skills) versus those who didn't (but they get the option to reroll), as the experience tally is a spendable resource. As a result, the tick-hunting might be constrained. The tally matters if players want to improve the odds of boosting their higher profession skills, rather than just using it to boost low surplus weapon skills, etc., via weapon swapping. A spendable resource makes a player think about the future more. Any thoughts? I kind of like the idea of a spendable resource for rolls per session. Basing it off of INT seems nice, but I'm wary of players whose characters have modest INT suffering in the long-run. But maybe it's realistic, since all the other stats matter significantly. A smart warrior is now quite dangerous in the long-run, too, due to rerolls, which seems fitting.
  13. Hi, I'm new to the forum and am interested in those files. I noticed the links were broken to the character sheet, rules, etc. Any chance they can be uploaded? Maybe Jason would allow it to be reposted here for download! Thanks, Nikoli.
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