Matt_E

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Matt_E last won the day on January 21

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About Matt_E

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  • RPG Biography
    Player, GM, Author
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    MYTHRAS
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    I talk too much.
  1. They're not parallels if they meet in the center. Sorry, couldn't resist...
  2. When I started playing RQ3 back in the 1980s, it was as a better alternative to AD&D. To put it bluntly, I was growing up, and my gaming taste was, too. At some level, I was probably looking for a better system for more or less the same style of play. This is precisely what Classic Fantasy brings: Mythras mechanics (modestly altered to fit) for the flavor of Old School play--plain and simple. I guess in principle the prime reason for me, then, would be nostalgia, a return to the roots. However, my tastes have continued to change, and I don't put that much stock in nostalgia. :-) I like CF as a product, but, it's not my cup of tea, nowadays. Rod has done a great job, though.
  3. When I briefly played an old edition of CoC, 25+ years ago, I did not miss hit locations. That is a game where avoiding combat is generally a really good idea. When switching from AD&D to RQ3, one of the things I liked best was hit locations, and the more realistic combat that came with that rule. When switching to RQ6/Mythras a few years ago, one of the first things I noticed was that the general HP total was gone, but that hit locations remained. I thought I would miss the general HP, because I liked the realism of "a pile of minor wounds can still kill you", but in fact I do not miss it at all. It required extra bookkeeping, and the centrality of Special Effects--particularly Bleed--in Mythras handles that piece of realism. Even if it would not break anything (but Loz notes that it would, basically, and I of course agree), personally I would not want to run Mythras without using hit locations, especially considering the frequency of combat in our home game.
  4. Yes; so did RQ3 (Spirit Magic), which is what I played for many years, before Mythras. This is sort of what I had in mind. Our RQ3 game was centered around Sorcery and Theism, and sorcerers would invariably create items with bound INT and POW spirits, into which spell knowledge was transferred. You can see where this leads. This became rather Monty Haul, after a while (though not as bad as actual AD&D). >> pachristian added: Keep in mind that "unbalancing" only applies if only one side has access to the ability. You shift the balance, but you only unbalance if you do not give the other side equal abilities. That's a fair point. My thought was that the players might seize upon the idea before the GM did, creating a (temporary) imbalance--followed by an escalation ("arms race") that would either never end or result in the demise of the campaign. My point, then, was that if either the players or the GM don't want that sort of situation, then the game will be spoiled. If both groups don't mind, fine. This is just a restatement of the usual advice: Unless everyone is on the same page, probably the fun will be spoiled, so be mindful. Meanwhile, if everyone keeps on the same page, then even unintended consequences of play probably will not spoil the fun. It's not really so difficult to achieve in practice, I think, but it bears mention.
  5. Note that this could easily unbalance a low-magic campaign. Before you go down this road, do sort out what level of magical gear you're truly prepared to deal with...because that is where you are likely to end up, if any of your players are at all Gamist. I don't mean to suggest that you should avoid matrices, but I feel it's important to know where you're likely to end up if you don't take precautions.
  6. Note that this could easily unbalance a low-magic campaign. Before you go down this road, do sort out what level of magical gear you're truly prepared to deal with...because that is where you are likely to end up, if any of your players are at all Gamist. I don't mean to suggest that you should avoid matrices, but I feel it's important to know where you're likely to end up if you don't take precautions.
  7. Um, if turning superoxide/peroxide into much less reactive O$_2$ doesn't reduce radical stress, then why does practically every living thing bother to do it? By electron counting and balancing net reactions, I'm pretty sure it does reduce radical stress--at least in the sense of radical count. In an environment with such high O$_2$ concentration, why bother to store any as peroxide esters? Just keep breathing. ...but this is all fun-time anyway, so have at it.
  8. My eyes caught on this: For a minimal change viz. humans, maybe the Blue Ones just have better superoxide dismutase in their blood and cells. As a side effect, in less aggressive atmospheres (like our own) they would probably have much longer lifespans. That could be a reason for some to move to other planets.
  9. There will be a release each month for the Mythras system in general, but not every one will be a Classic Fantasy product, as I understand.
  10. As I wrote on the TDM forum when the CONAN 2d20 game came out, to me the 2d20 system seems weaker that Mythras, yet still probably suitable for purpose in this case. My initial impression was that the 2d20 system allows for too many player successes (i.e. challenges would almost always be met, so less true drama and more "faux danger"), but that is an almost meaningless opinion, as I have not played the system. It also seems to me that use of the GM's Doom pool versus the players' Momentum pool could rule a lot of the game. ...but I have already dragged the thread far enough from the OP...
  11. Wow, sounds like a recipe for real cognitive dissonance. :-)
  12. So, albedo, then. There will also be albedo from tremendous cloud cover that will result from the constant high humidity over most of the globe...but I'm unsure of what other than water vapor might be in the atmosphere, to trap the heat that the water is assumed to absorb... Water or ice, if all that heat just gets re-radiated back into space, well, so much for your warm planet with energetic climate. It's rather complicated. However, since this is just a game, if we can accept light sabers and hyperspace travel, ahem, then I think we can overlook some of the intricacies of geophysics.
  13. I'm trying to stay positive/not become totally negative here, but it's becoming difficult...so, this is the last I will contribute to this thread. The quoted sentence at first seems merely to be a disingenuous argument ("moving the goalposts"), but shortly is revealed to be a complete canard, as the following sentences proceed to describe precisely the same ideas of hit points, damage, etc., just using different words--! What, then, is the "bigger picture", exactly? The OP was the one who brought up "designing a game", so I am dumbfounded by the claim that I have somehow missed the point in focusing on mechanics (especially when the alleged point is then described in essentially the same terms that I would use in my own suggestions). I should probably just go back to publishing some content...
  14. "Now since water absorbs more energy than ice" I don't understand this statement. Are you referring to specific heat? At what temperature and pressure? I think albedo might have a bigger effect; is that what you mean?
  15. I think I misread the word "stabilization". If I had read it as "feedback control", it might have made more sense. The only way a gyroscope helps you here, AFAICS, is to tell the thrusters or other mechanisms that adjust your course when to stop adjusting, because your actual heading matches what your captain selected, which is what the gyroscope's disposition reflects. I don't know what you mean by "decenter", but, I admit, at this point my interest wanes.