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Runic magic


Puck

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I am trying to put together a slightly different magic system that will work for the various traditions in the Green. It kind of incorporates a little of BRP's "magic" and "Sorcery". I am a little afraid that the description is a little convoluted and unclear. I am also concerned that it is a little to much like MRQ's rune magic. I would appreciate any comments or advice.

(note: each runic realm will have roughly 10 individual spells associated with it, but those would be described later).

Runic Magic

Runic magic is the prevalent magic that is used in the Green. It incorporates elements of both Magic and Sorcery. In order to cast spells a character must be spiritually or psychically bound or attuned to a particular rune. Characters who are attuned to a rune are often called talented. The binding ceremony often must be accomplished in a location that is particularly strong or infused with the particular rune and often during portentous times. To become talented a character generally needs the guidance of a teacher or spiritual guide who is already talented and skilled in the use of the rune. The process of binding a rune costs the recipient a point of permanent Pow. Once a character is talented they gain the runic skill of the particular rune they sacrificed for at a level equal to their intelligence. Attunement with a rune assumes a character has a deeper mystical understanding and belief in the tenants and primacy of the particular rune.

Once a character is talented in a rune they may begin to learn spells and enchantments associated with that rune. All spells within a rune realm are cast using the Runic Skill from that particular rune. In order to successfully wield spells a character must have a rune matrix or focus for that particular spell within his vision as well as be able to make the particular gestures and utterances to bring about the effects of the spell. As with other forms of magic, characters may only know as many spell levels as they have points in Int.

What are Runes?

Runes are pictograph symbols containing the essence of a particular power, concept, or force in the physical world. Each rune represents a spoken sound as well as a hand or body motion, that when combined with particular thoughts, images, or beliefs can bring about magical and physical manifestations in the material world.

The runes themselves represent the particular concept or idea and alone are simply a form of writing or symbol. The pictograph can then be combined with other runes or prefixes, suffixes and accents to add verbal action, meaning, and manipulation to the rune. Visually speaking the rune and the prefix intersect forming essentially a new spell rune called a matrix. For instance the rune Fire incorporating the prefix “inception”, to ignite, and suffix “throw” would denote the matrix to magically hurl flaming missiles at an enemy. Each spell tied to a particular rune has a pictograph symbol or matrix depicting the rune, incorporating the particular suffixes, prefixes and accents to affect the spell. Spell matrices are usually inscribed on weapons, jewelry, staffs, rods, or as tattoos on hands and arms.

When characters learn spells it is assumed that they learn the required accents, prefixes and suffixes, as well as the gestures and utterances that when added to the rune will bring about the spell effects.

Many traditions combine multiple runes into a common idea. These are called compound runes and essentially work the same as singular runes but tend to be less powerful magically speaking.

There are also several very powerful suffixes that are runes in their own right and must be attuned like any other rune. When combined with other runes to cast spells suffixes can be very powerful.

Stasis/Permanence :

Casters who are attuned to the stasis rune may double the duration of many spells by rolling under both the runic skill of the base spell as well as the runic skill of the Stasis Rune. In order to double the duration of the spell an additional point of power must be spent; In order to triple the length of the spell two point must be spent etc.

The Stasis rune also allows effects of some spells to become permanent. This rune is necessary to infuse items with permanent magical powers. The use of the Stasis rune in this way generally cost permanent Pow.

Mastery:

The mastery rune allows magicians to cast spells at a greater level than may normally be possible. The rune of mastery may be added to any Spell allows variable spells to be cast at any level as long as the caster knows the spell at its basic level. The spell still requires the allotted Pow expense.

For instance: If a Spell user knows Sorcerers Sharp Flame at a level of “one” they may cast it as if they knew it at a level of five as long as they rolled under both their Fire Rune skill and their Mastery Rune Skill. The spell would require the expense of five points of power to cast.

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I think it's an interesting idea, but could use some clarification. As you note, at times it does get convoluted... That being said, I'm not familiar with Mongoose's product, so I can't say how close it is to that.

The process of binding a rune costs the recipient a point of permanent Pow. Once a character is talented they gain the runic skill of the particular rune they sacrificed for at a level equal to their intelligence.

Since characters can learn to use more than Runic Realm, shouldn't one have primacy? If so, would it make more sense to have the starting score based on POW? For two reasons... 1. This doesn't seem like the scholarly magic a book-schooled wizard will have, it seems more primal and atavistic. 2. It forces them to decide which Rune will be their 'primary' Rune, so to speak. Since they lose a permanent point of POW when they learn one Rune, the second Rune they learn will be at a lower base chance and so and so forth. The first Rune has a primacy in their life that others won't be able to match, at least at first.

For instance the rune Fire incorporating the prefix “inception”, to ignite, and suffix “throw” would denote the matrix to magically hurl flaming missiles at an enemy.

Are you going to predifine the available and prefixes and suffixes? If not, can players create a 'word' on the fly to cast a spontaneous spell? For example, if a character finds himself facing a fire element and happens to be part of the Runic Realm of Water, can he toss together the prefix 'frigid' and suffix 'throw' to create ice bolts to throw, even if he never knew the ice bolt spell (or, if an icebolt spell doesn't even exist)? Personally, I like the idea of spontaneous casting. It adds something of a shamanistic feel to the system.

When characters learn spells it is assumed that they learn the required accents, prefixes and suffixes, as well as the gestures and utterances that when added to the rune will bring about the spell effects.

Who/what do they learn spells from? Other Runic masters, books, themeselves through trial and error?

Many traditions combine multiple runes into a common idea. These are called compound runes and essentially work the same as singular runes but tend to be less powerful magically speaking.

Can I get an example of combining Runes?

There are also several very powerful suffixes that are runes in their own right and must be attuned like any other rune. When combined with other runes to cast spells suffixes can be very powerful.

I imagine they should either be suffixes or Runes. If the suffix is that powerful, maybe it should just ascend to Runic status.

Casters who are attuned to the stasis rune may double the duration of many spells by rolling under both the runic skill of the base spell as well as the runic skill of the Stasis Rune. In order to double the duration of the spell an additional point of power must be spent; In order to triple the length of the spell two point must be spent etc.

What happens if the Statis roll succeeds and the other fails? Is there some lingering effect such as they can't recast the spell for the time the Statis is in effect or some other temporal issue?

Mastery:

The mastery rune allows magicians to cast spells at a greater level than may normally be possible. The rune of mastery may be added to any Spell allows variable spells to be cast at any level as long as the caster knows the spell at its basic level. The spell still requires the allotted Pow expense.

For instance: If a Spell user knows Sorcerers Sharp Flame at a level of “one” they may cast it as if they knew it at a level of five as long as they rolled under both their Fire Rune skill and their Mastery Rune Skill. The spell would require the expense of five points of power to cast.

Is is possible to permanently expend POW to permanently augment the power of a spell? Or maybe with a critical roll of the mastery the spell is permantly increased by a level?

All in all, I think the idea is interesting and would use it. I definitely think it needs some fleshing out and clarificiation. Those were just some of the questions I had.

As I think of more, I'll post them.

Thanks for sharing this.

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Out of curiosity Puck, have you seen The Bronze Grimoire? It seems to come close to what you're doing. Also, have you seen Melds from Darcsyde's Corum and the Magic System from Unknown East? Both have an interesting system for combining effects.

Anyway, I like what you're doing. Looking forward to how it develops.

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Thank You. Your insights and questions are very helpful.

Quote:

Since characters can learn to use more than Runic Realm, shouldn't one have primacy? If so, would it make more sense to have the starting score based on POW? For two reasons... 1. This doesn't seem like the scholarly magic a book-schooled wizard will have, it seems more primal and atavistic. 2. It forces them to decide which Rune will be their 'primary' Rune, so to speak. Since they lose a permanent point of POW when they learn one Rune, the second Rune they learn will be at a lower base chance and so and so forth. The first Rune has a primacy in their life that others won't be able to match, at least at first.

Yep, this makes sense. I will seriously take it into consideration. The reasons I went with Int are:

1.That seems to be the formula in BRP(not a particularly great reason).

2. It helps with balance making the Int characteristic somewhat more important.

3. Int could represent the concentration and memory and learning it takes to affect runic spells.

I seriously contemplated using Int+Pow and may still do this. Once a character is attuned, casting spells should not be too difficult. This would make newer characters more able. Combining two characteristic is very MRQ and I always feel a little like a copycat when things get too close( I probably shouldn't let that bother me though).

Quote:

Are you going to predefine the available and prefixes and suffixes? If not, can players create a 'word' on the fly to cast a spontaneous spell? For example, if a character finds himself facing a fire element and happens to be part of the Runic Realm of Water, can he toss together the prefix 'frigid' and suffix 'throw' to create ice bolts to throw, even if he never knew the ice bolt spell (or, if an icebolt spell doesn't even exist)? Personally, I like the idea of spontaneous casting. It adds something of a shamanistic feel to the system.

Whew! This is a wonderful idea! The problem is that is makes it even more messy. I like the idea of set spells for simplicity sake but I also like the idea of malleability. Creative players and Gm's could come up with new spells based on accents prefixes and suffixes. Furthermore characters could come by old runes inscribed on weapons, items and ruins that contain the knowledge for lost spells.

That said I had not planned on detailing all the prefixes and suffixes except for the powerful ones that are runes in their own right. I added this section not as statistics or hard rules, but rather for flavor and an explanation of what was going on when characters cast spells.

Who/what do they learn spells from? Other Runic masters, books, themselves through trial and error?

Whoops, I need to make this clearer. Other Runic masters and teachers in their tradition.

Can I get an example of combining Runes?

I was really just playing with this idea to try to make certain runic traditions or cults to work. It is driving me nuts. Every idea seems to make things horribly more complicated. I have a cult of Neraydian Arrowdancers. They teach a compound Arrowdancing rune incorporating the Runes of Air, Wealding (tree), and death. All of these runes interlock in an arrow shaped triangle to form the arrowdancing rune that allows spells that incorporate each of the runes.

I also have the Brotherhood of Dauchiet which uses the separate runes of Man, Mente, and Spirit to represent the physical, mental and spiritual abilities of their philosophy.

I am still trying to work all this out myself and make it relatively simple and playable and yet sort of unique and esoteric.

Quote:

Originally Posted by Puck

I imagine they should either be suffixes or Runes. If the suffix is that powerful, maybe it should just ascend to Runic status.

This is true. The problem I was trying to figure out was whether someone who gains a Stasis rune within their studies of the Wealding (tree magic) rune could then use it with any other rune that they may have just learned. For simplicities sake I may just do it as you suggest.

Quote:

What happens if the Statis roll succeeds and the other fails? Is there some lingering effect such as they can't recast the spell for the time the Statis is in effect or some other temporal issue?

Probably nothing, the spell just fails. That keeps things simpler. Cool idea though.

Quote:

Originally Posted by Puck

Is is possible to permanently expend POW to permanently augment the power of a spell? Or maybe with a critical roll of the mastery the spell is permanently increased by a level?

No, but with the stasis/permanence rune spell effects could be made permanent.

Within certain traditions something similar is possible.

The idea of the Mastery rune would be to allow Rune mages to keep a large array of spells for a low Int expenditure and to cast more powerful spells than otherwise possible.

Thanks again your questions are very helpful.

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Out of curiosity Puck, have you seen The Bronze Grimoire? It seems to come close to what you're doing. Also, have you seen Melds from Darcsyde's Corum and the Magic System from Unknown East? Both have an interesting system for combining effects.

I have not seen the Bronze Grimoire or Melds, but I have seen the spheres and runes from the Unknown East and it is brilliant. (I just noticed it was written by Loz. I have learned that just about anything he writes is a must buy). Just the same, I hope the stuff I am doing here is not a direct copy of other peoples work and maintains some originality.

What is killing me is the need to make the system relatively simple for playing and newcomers, but allows for more complexity and growth for storytelling purposes.

Anyway, I like what you're doing. Looking forward to how it develops
.

Thanks, Lets me know I am on the right track.:)

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Thanks for answering the questions.It's helping to clear things up. I have a few followup questions/comments.

Yep, this makes sense. I will seriously take it into consideration. The reasons I went with Int are:

1.That seems to be the formula in BRP(not a particularly great reason).

2. It helps with balance making the Int characteristic somewhat more important.

3. Int could represent the concentration and memory and learning it takes to affect runic spells.

I seriously contemplated using Int+Pow and may still do this. Once a character is attuned, casting spells should not be too difficult. This would make newer characters more able. Combining two characteristic is very MRQ and I always feel a little like a copycat when things get too close( I probably shouldn't let that bother me though).

I wouldn't let the fact that BRP traditionally uses INT or that combining INT+POW is very MRQ dissuade you. It's your game and you'll end up with something different in the long run.

Since the magic strikes me as a more 'primitive' magic, POW just makes more sense than INT. I've always viewed INT as the stat for scholarly magic and sorcery. I'm not sure on combining the two for the base starting score, but that may work.

Whew! This is a wonderful idea! The problem is that is makes it even more messy. I like the idea of set spells for simplicity sake but I also like the idea of malleability. Creative players and Gm's could come up with new spells based on accents prefixes and suffixes. Furthermore characters could come by old runes inscribed on weapons, items and ruins that contain the knowledge for lost spells.

That said I had not planned on detailing all the prefixes and suffixes except for the powerful ones that are runes in their own right. I added this section not as statistics or hard rules, but rather for flavor and an explanation of what was going on when characters cast spells.

Will you just be outlining the available spells and what Runic Realm is required to cast them?

Do you mind if I take this and work on it for a primitive magic system in my setting? Magic or sorcery are much to 'learned' for my setting.

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Will you just be outlining the available spells and what Runic Realm is required to cast them?

Yep, in addition to the required "Components". Totemists need ritually prepared pelts and bone weapons as foci to make their spells work. Arrowdancers have to make their arrows in advance and inscribe them with the proper runes etc. Again no real change in the hard "rules", but a lot of "story" based requirements. There are some invading magics as well that have crept into the Green from the outside world. These are less component heavy (maybe based more on Int than Pow). Most traditions also have some special ability magics that require permanent pow costs or special training.

Do you mind if I take this and work on it for a primitive magic system in my setting? Magic or sorcery are much to 'learned' for my setting.

Not at all, I would be flattered. I would love to hear what you come up with.

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I am trying to put together a slightly different magic system that will work for the various traditions in the Green. It kind of incorporates a little of BRP's "magic" and "Sorcery". I am a little afraid that the description is a little convoluted and unclear. I am also concerned that it is a little to much like MRQ's rune magic. I would appreciate any comments or advice.

I don't think there's any need to worry about it being too close to MRQ's rune magic in substance, but the with the same name, there could be some confusion. What about calling it "elemental magic" or something like that, which required the use of poweful magic "symbols" or items linked to the particular "element"?

To me, the word "runes" gives assosiations to old northern mythology and somewhat to Glorantha, but not much else. Also, with MRQ spreading the use of "Rune Magic" into several other setting, the name is getting a bit used up. (This opinion might just be coming from my cultural bias though.)

SGL.

Ef plest master, this mighty fine grub!
b1.gif 116/420. High Priest.

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I certainly see your point. I wish there were another appropriate word. Runes fit the bill so well though. I was hoping I could Make the distinction in the runes themselves, like totems for different beasts rather than one beast rune and such. I could possibly use terminology different like "Domains" or "realms", all incorporating the basic idea or power.

To me, the word "runes" gives associations to old northern mythology and somewhat to Glorantha, but not much else.

Both LotR's and the Elric stuff use variations of runes. To me they seem as ubiquitous in fantasy as magic wands, crystal balls, or spells themselves, but I do not live in a Scandinavian country and may have a slightly different perception. Of course in my youth I was suckled on runequest as well, which may have skewed my view even more.

What about calling it "elemental magic" or something like that, which required the use of powerful magic "symbols" or items linked to the particular "element"?

"Elemental magic" would not work with most of the Magic in the Green as it is often based on forms, totems, and Ideas rather than elements. Symbolic magic may sort of fit the bill, but it seems way weaker of a term than runes.

I think it would be hard to remove runic magic now without some clear and solid synonym to replace it with. I think the Key is in making runic magic somehow conceptually different than what has come before. I do not know if I totally pull this off, but I can try.

In the mean time I will be on the lookout for other terminology that may be able to swap in.

Thanks, Great observation. You certainly have me re-thinking things.

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Have you considered using the word "Glyph" to describe this character-based magic system?

That might focus things a little differently, and provide an alternate description than "rune".

No, I had not considered glyph. I don't know how it had passed me by but it may be just the word I am looking for. :thumb: Thanks!

I had reconsdered the whole foundation of the magic system for a brief span of time and then went on to something else hoping things would resove themselves. It looks as if they have just done so. "Glyph"... has a Greeny, treelike sound to it as well. :) I'll have to think about it some, but right now it seems great. Thanks again.

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Not used often enough to be obscure, not used little enough to still be on the tongues of most English-speakers.

Naming things is terribly important - it can take some real effort to find the "right" name.

Glad the word suits your purpose! It's a good word, too...

I'll have to get back up to speed on reading the wiki about The Green.

-pax-

Emerging from my Dark Age...

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Puck's The Green articles are no longer there. It was a requirement from Chaosium's side that it was taken down if it was to be made into monograph.

So where does that leave SharedWorld? Do we continue, assuming the Green is still there, or does it now have to be written-out? I thought a founding principle of the SharedWorld project was that the stuff would remain there and could be modified/extended by all. Doesn't that contravene the 'license'? (I guess this is really a topic for the sub-forum...)

Britain has been infiltrated by soviet agents to the highest levels. They control the BBC, the main political party leaderships, NHS & local council executives, much of the police, most newspapers and the utility companies. Of course the EU is theirs, through-and-through. And they are among us - a pervasive evil, like Stasi.

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It did not seem like a lot was happening there. The thing that really made me think about submitting this to Chaosium was actually a couple of posts you made a while back about making the Shared-world a new fantasy setting for BRP. The Green still has all the bits that can connect it to the shared world: Gates are still there. I hope submitting the Green to Chaosium has not caused any bad feelings.

By the way Check your PM's Frogspawner.

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So where does that leave SharedWorld? Do we continue, assuming the Green is still there, or does it now have to be written-out?

I think we should assume that a great forrest is still there, and use soltakks article as guidelines.

I thought a founding principle of the SharedWorld project was that the stuff would remain there and could be modified/extended by all.

Only Puck's articles concerning the Green have been removed, soltakks' and Rust's are still there. Doesn't that contravene the 'license'? (I guess this is really a topic for the sub-forum...)

The CC-Wiki license basically states that you are free to:

  1. to Share — to copy, distribute and transmit the work
  2. to Remix — to adapt the work
As long as you follow the following conditions:

  1. Attribution. You must attribute the work in the manner specified by the author or licensor (but not in any way that suggests that they endorse you or your use of the work).
  2. Share Alike. If you alter, transform, or build upon this work, you may distribute the resulting work only under the same, similar or a compatible license.
Any of the above conditions can be waived if you get permission from the copyright holder.

Nothing in this license impairs or restricts the author's moral rights.

As the articles were Pucks work, and weren't modified by anyone, Puck has the right to do whatever he wants with his work. Because of the license, I could have chosen not to remove the articles. And if you have a copy of them, you are free to share and remix them as outlined above. However, as Chaosium demanded this as a requirement for it to be published, and the ShareWorld project have been in a bit of stasis, I chose to go along with Puck's request so that it could be made into a monograph.

SGL.

Ef plest master, this mighty fine grub!
b1.gif 116/420. High Priest.

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I have continued to mess around with a now "Glyphic" system of magic that can work as the basis or core for several magic traditions in the Green. It is still in a rough form, but it is starting to come together bit by bit. I would love any suggestions, ideas or comments.

What are Glyphs?

Glyphs are pictographic symbols or ideograms representing the essence of a particular power, concept, or force in the physical world. The glyphs themselves do not contain any power, and by themselves are only a symbol or type of writing but to those talented in their use glyphs become much more. They are a mystical focus representing a spoken sound as well as a hand or body motion. These gestures and utterances used in concert with particular thoughts, images, and beliefs, may bring about magical and physical manifestations in the material world.

Glyphic Magic

Glyphic magic is the prevalent magic that is used in the Green. It incorporates elements of both Magic and Sorcery. In order to use glyphic magic a character must be spiritually or psychically bound or attuned to a particular Glyph. Characters who are attuned to a Glyph are often called talented. The binding ceremony often must be accomplished in a location that is particularly strong or infused with the power of the particular glyph and often during portentous times. To become talented a character generally needs the guidance of a teacher or spiritual guide who is already talented and skilled in the use of the Glyph. The process of binding a glyph costs the recipient a point of permanent Pow. Once a character is talented they gain the Glyphic Skill of the particular glyph at a level equal to their Int + Pow. Attunement with a glyph assumes a character has a deeper mystical understanding and belief in the tenants and primacy of the particular glyph and the power it represents.

Once a character is talented they may begin to learn spells and enchantments associated with that glyph. All spells within a glyphic realm are cast using the pertaining Glyphic Skill. In order to successfully wield spells a character must have a matrix for that particular spell within his vision as well as be able to make the particular gestures and utterances to bring about the effects of the spell. Spells may also require certain components to be cast successfully. As with other forms of magic, characters may only know as many spell levels as they have points in Int.

The glyphs themselves represent the particular concept or idea and alone are simply a form of writing or symbol. The pictograph can then be combined with accent marks to add verbal action, meaning, and manipulation to the glyph. Visually speaking the glyph and the accents intersect forming essentially a new spell glyph called a matrix. For instance the glyph Fire incorporating the accent “inception”, to ignite, and accent “throw” would denote the matrix to magically hurl flaming missiles at an enemy. Each spell tied to a particular glyph has a pictographic symbol or matrix depicting the glyph itself modified by the accents necessary to affect the spell. Spell matrices are usually inscribed on weapons, jewelry, staffs, rods, or as tattoos on hands and arms.

When characters learn spells it is assumed that they learn the required accents, as well as the gestures and utterances that when added to the glyph will bring about the spell effects.

Many traditions combine multiple glyphs into a common idea. These are called compound glyphs and essentially work the same as singular glyphs but tend to be less powerful but magically speaking but have a wider variation of effects.

There are also several very powerful accents called suffixes that are glyphs in their own right and must be attuned like any other Glyphs. When combined with other “core” glyphs to cast spells suffixes can be very powerful. The use of Suffixes and how they interact with the core glyph are usually closely guarded secrets and only taught to highly trusted individuals within magical traditions.

Durative Suffix :

Casters who are attuned to the Durative glyph may double the duration of many spells by rolling under both the Glyphic skill of the base spell as well as the glyphic skill of the durative glyph. In order to double the duration of the spell an additional point of power must be spent; In order to triple the length of the spell two point must be spent etc.

The durative suffix also allows effects of some spells to become permanent. This Suffix is necessary to infuse items with permanent magical powers. The use of the durative glyph in this way generally cost permanent Pow.

In order to permanently endow spell effects onto an item a magician must first know the spell in question to at least the level they intend to enchant the item with. They must then prepare the object to be endowed with the enchantment with the proper glyphs. An enchanter must expend the permanent Pow necessary to fuel the enchantment and roll below both the core glyphic skill as well as the durative glyphic skill to enchant the item.

A success will permanently bestow the enchantment upon the item. A failure requires the Enchanter to begin the process anew. If the Enchanter rolls a fumble they loose the expended Pow and the enchantment fails. On a critical success the item may be endowed with greater effects as if the enchanter has spent one extra Pow when casting the spell.

Spells commonly used in enchantments are weapon and armor enhancements of various kinds as well as the enchantment for magic staffs. Enchantments may also infuse an item with the knowledge and ability to cast particular spells.

In the case of magic staffs this magic works slightly different. The enchantment of magic staffs is a cooperative effort between the enchanter and an initiate or applicant to a particular tradition. The spell is cast using the enchanters skill, but the permanent Pow necessary to enchant the staff is expended by the applicant.

The durative glyph appears as a circle surrounding the core glyph and represents the unending or infinite cycle of the glyphs power.

Mastery Suffix:

The mastery suffix allows magicians to cast spells at a greater level than may normally be possible. The glyph of mastery may be added to any spell allows variable spells to be cast at any level as long as the caster knows the spell at its basic level. The spell still requires the allotted Pow expense.

For instance: If a Spell user knows Sorcerers Sharp Flame at a level of “one” they may cast it as if they knew it at a level of five as long as they rolled under both their Fire Rune skill and their Integral Rune Skill. The spell would require the expense of five points of power to cast.

Casters talented in the mastery suffix no longer need matrices or components to cast spells as they have infused the essence of the core glyph into their bodies and minds. A magician casting spells without components or matrixes must roll under both the core Glyphic Skill and the Integral Suffix Skill.

Those who would become talented in the mastery suffix must know the core Glyph at a skill of at least 90%.

The mastery suffix is required by those who would teach or bind others to the core glyph.

The mastery suffix appears as a enclosed arch surrounding the core Glyph with the pediment beneath and the arching crown above.

Alteration Suffix

Some glyphs may allow the use of the alteration suffix. It is sometimes called the Glyph of forms. This glyphic suffix allows talented to take on a slightly different shape or form based on the glyph in question. Not all glyphic traditions teach the alteration suffix. It is particularly common among the totemic and wealding glyphs. The effects differ from practice to practice and is discussed in the individual selections.

The alteration suffix appears as a stick figure transposed by the core glyph.

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