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Fresh Blood for the BRP world....


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Alright, to be completely honest with all of you, I have owned the CoC book for years but I have never played it or ran it. I have used it for inspiration but, never actually used it. Then, last month and the local game day I sat in a four hour one shot campaign using the BRP system where we played basically B-Movie or more C-movie Super spies. Truth be told, I had a blast. I love percentage based systems for some reason, to bad there are very few out there.

Anyway, with BRP in my hands I am thinking about trying to run a Zombie Bash type of game. I know this genre has been shot to undeath, but it sounds like it could be fun. I am thinking of more of a Zombieland style of a dash of Resident Evil thrown in. (Zombie dogs, random monsters, super zombies, etc).

Is there any suggestions you can give? Helpful hints?

Also, can someone explain how to use those big resistance tables?

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Welcome to the happy place, Dude!

I haven't personally experienced the dread aftermath of Rubble and Ruin, but it sounds like your sort of thing. Perhaps one of the other board members would care to chime in with a more informed opinion?

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The Resistance Table is really just a simple mathematical formula that even I can do in my head (and I'm poor at math). It's presented in a table for easy reference, but most people don't need to refer to it once you get the hang of it.

It works like this: It's used to compare 2 values that are not normally more than 10 apart. You use it to overcome someone else's POW with your POW, or to overcome an object's SIZ with your STR. There are many uses.

To use it, start with the assumption that there is a 50% chance of success. Then, for every point of difference between the two values that are being compared, you add or subtract 5% to the total.

So if a person with 15 POW is trying to overcome a person with 10 POW, you find the difference (15-10=5) and multiply by 5% to get 25%. Since the person making the roll is the higher value, add the 25% to the base 50% chance to get a total of 75%. The person with 15 POW thus rolls 75% or less to overcome the person with 10 POW.

A Person with 10 POW has only a 25% chance to overcome someone with 15 POW (50%-25%)

A person with 13 STR has a 65% chance to move a rock of SIZ 10. (50%+15%)

Etc.

It's that simple.

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You lost me a little with all that math, is there a way of explaining it so it makes it easier to look up the results on the table?

Oh, and hopefully I will be able to get my hands on Rubble and Ruin for inspiration, but until then I can't really afford anything extra, so if anyone has ran a Zombie game before, or if anyone wants to kinda take me under their wing, that would be awesome.

"Strippers? Awesome. Lesbian strippers? Double-awesome. Lesbian strippers whipping off their trenchcoats only to reveal a katana tucked delicately in a garter or g-string? That is a face full of awesome"

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if the scores involved are equal, the aggressor has a 50% chance of success. For every pt stronger (or weaker) the agressor has a +5% better (or -5% worse chance if they are the lower score).

18 vs 18 ... 50%

18 vs 17... 55 % 50+((18-17)*5)

18 vs 16... 60% 50+((18-16)*5)

18 vs 10... 90% 50+((18-10)*5)

17 vs 18... 45% 50+((17-18)*5)

10 vs 18... 10% 50+((10-18)*5)

10 vs 10....50% 50+((10-10)*5)

Pretty much the same principle as the OCV vs DCV of Hero Games combat resolution....except it's *5% and you roll percentiles.

Edited by USAFguy
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I prefer to figure Resistance Rolls like this...

Doing something that involves (say) Strength requires a STR x 5 percentile roll.

If it's opposed (e.g. by an enemy's Strength or an object's Size) then modify it +/-5% per point the opposing Stat is under/over 10.

That's it. (And the numbers are the same as on the Resistance Table.)

Howzat?

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I think Dude_of_Legend isn't asking about the math behind the Resistance Table as much as just how to read it.

Lets say your character has been poisoned with a POT (potency) 15 spider venom. Your character has a CON of 12, as this is the characteristic being used to resist the poison, it is the active characteristic and is found by reading across the top column.

The spiders venom (POT 15) is being resisted so it is the passive characteristic. Run down the left side of the table and find the 15 (for the POT) then cross reference this number with the characters CON to find your chance to resist the effects of the poison. In this case, your character has a 35% chance to resist.

With poison, it usually means if you fail the resistance roll you take an amount of damage equal to the POT, while if you succeed, you take half damage. However, this damage usually sets in after a short time.

Once you get the hang of the Resistance Table, you'll find that it can be easily ignored using the suggestions noted earlier. But for now, that's the jist of it.

Rod

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Technically, the spider venom is the active characteristic (it is attacking), while your character's CON is the passive (defensive) characteristic.

However, the % chance is the same, whichever label you give either side.

True, but for some reason I find it easier to remember when the one making the die roll is "active". In this case the player is rolling therefore active. I suppose its a matter of semantics more than anything as it still gives the same result either way. But as Jason says reading it the other way is actually the correct way to read the table. Never argue with the one who's name is on the book.;D

Rod

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"D100 - Exactly 5 times better than D20"

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