Jump to content

threedeesix

Members
  • Content Count

    1,273
  • Joined

  • Last visited

  • Days Won

    26

Everything posted by threedeesix

  1. It really depends on what the spell did in AD&D as to what gets boosted in Classic Fantasy. For the most part, anything that had effects that increased per level, are instead increased per Intensity in Classic Fantasy. So, some spells might only see their damage get an increase, while others, like Illusionary terrain for example, see their Area of Effect, Range, and Duration all increase. What I did different from the first edition of Classic Fantasy however is that where in the first each effect had to be increased separately, in the new version increasing Intensity increases all variables that are dependent on it. So it is no longer necessary to increase each individually. Rod
  2. Hello Classic Fantasy gamers.I'm looking for a few additional playtesters for Classic Fantasy. Particularly for the upcoming Unearthed Companion (new classes, spells, miniatures combat options, and variant spell casting system), but also input on the World of Greymoor (new deities, realm spells, additions to Ships and Shield Walls, etc.)I need people with an existing group that are currently playing so these options can be tested in play. However, if you are experienced with Mythras AND with Dungeons and Dragons, let me know, I may be able to use you on a fact-checking level.Drop me a PM with your experience and I'll look it over and get back to you within a day or so. Apply now, space is limited. Rod
  3. Camouflaging oneself with foliage, mud. etc. to gain a bonus to Stealth rolls in the wilderness. Think Arnie in Predator. or any number of military movies or real-life events.
  4. Is this Mythic Babylon 5? OMG This is Awesome!!! Mythic Babylon 5. I can't believe it. OMG. My favorite Scifi comes to my favorite game!!! OMG... OMG. 😉 Rod OMG
  5. With regards to Lightning Bolt, the text reads that all targets within the 10' path take the damage (which is based on that found in the Spell Damage Table) to 1d6 Body Locations if I remember right. Also, in the upcoming Companion, I have several new rules for Luck Points. One states that a spell caster (semi or otherwise) may spend a Luck Point to regain all spent personal Magic Points. Not Magic Points from items. This may only be performed once per day for each Rank attained beyond 1 and requires at least a few minutes of rest, so cant be used during combat. Because characters gain an additional Luck Point for each Rank attained beyond the first, this helps to simulate the greater number, and more powerful spells able to be cast at higher "levels", while still requiring a caster to keep an eye on their expenditure during combat. Right now, the rule is noted as optional while it undergoes additional playtesting, However, my local playtesters find it balanced, and fitting the original source material, as the fighters tend to use their Luck Points to avoid injury, while the casters use theirs to replenish Magic Points, making them more prone to injury if not careful. Hope this helps. Rod
  6. When I was writing the BRP version of Classic Fantasy, I playtested it with my group by playing through Against the Giants. We had a blast. We intend on continuing the adventures of Valamir, Sorack, Lorissa, Alexandra, Lilly, and Rengarth later this year by finishing up the giant saga, and moving on to D1-3. Obviously, using Mythras Classic Fantasy. Rod
  7. Unfortunately, Chaosium's management at the time (not the wonderful crew running things now) were very difficult to deal with and all of my emails went unanswered. The odd thing is that during its run, Classic Fantasy was their best selling non-Cthulhu monograph, so it mystified me that they just didn't seem to care. Eventually, I gave up and moved on. For what it's worth, Mythras Classic Fantasy is the spiritual successor to the BRP version, and a much more complete and well supported product.
  8. For the record, playing Classic Fantasy is nothing like "playing" D&D. That would imply that Classic Fantasy is just another of the many D&D retro-clones that can be found in print. A much more accurate statement would be "If I want to play D&D, I play D&D. But if I want to play in a D&D type setting with a more realistic and exciting set of rules, I play Classic Fantasy." 😉 Rod
  9. That's odd, seems to be working fine for me. Maybe it's incompatible with some versions of excel?
  10. There is definitely a place for the Anti-Paladin in Classic Fantasy, as I have already written up the class for the Companion. It is based on the Dragon Magazine version, with the one exception being that I down-play the mustache twirling Snidely Whiplash feel in favor of a terrifying death knight. They lack all of the honor typical of the paladin, even so much as possessing the back stab abilities of the thief. They can control undead and even lead undead armies. They're nasty. Rod
  11. Still hoping for this year, but that's all I can say at this time. We'll see.
  12. Behind schedule, but still working on it. Change of jobs has really slowed down production.
  13. Classic Fantasy has the most basic of information for improvised weapons as an entry on both the one-handed and two-handed weapon tables. It really just serves as an example to serve as a base to extrapolate from. Essentially, a 'generic' one-handed weapon does 1d6-1, has a Size of S to M, and a Reach of M. A 'generic' two-handed weapon does 1d8-1, has a Size of M to L (there is a typo noting it as S to M), and a Reach of S (typically, a two-handed improvised weapon, like a bar stool, will have a shorter reach then a one-handed improvised weapon, like a pool cue). However, this is subject to interpretation by the GM based on the actual item. In all cases, an improvised weapon's Combat Effects are assigned on a case-by-case basis, and attacks are one grade more difficult. I wish I had thought to add Improvised Shield to the Table. Rod
  14. Last call for submissions. Ok, not really as we'll never turn down a really great idea, but over the next couple weekends (starting today), I plan on going through the submissions already received, and making the final selections with Lawrence so we can get the contracts out. So, if your sitting on a great idea for a Classic Fantasy adventure module, now is the time to send me your submission if you want to see it sometime in 2018. Those that have sent me submissions already can expect to hear back one way or another by September 3rd. Thanks to all of you that have shown an interest, the number of submissions has been fantastic, and the Mythras Classic Fantasy fan base are some very creative folks. Rod
  15. Don't know who Rob is, but he better not be planning on usurping Classic Fantasy from me. ;-) No, I'm not getting burnt out, and thanks for the mini review of Tomb of the Mad Wizard. Glad you liked it. Rod
  16. Now, some new stuff rescued from the archives of my old storage devices. While I have nothing against the Sanity rules of Call of Cthulhu, I don't think they are necessarily suitable for all horror settings when simulating Fear. Another horror RPG that I believe does it just as well, if not better for my uses, is Pacesetter's Chill. Years ago, I translated the Fear Check rules to BRP for a yearly Halloween BRP Chill game that I ran for more then a decade. Here are those rules, along with the rules for Sensing the Unknown. These rules are written by Michael Williams and only converted by myself. Also, here is one of the adventures that I converted to BRP during the playtest. The adventure is only converted by myself, and I do not claim ownership of the material. Rod
  17. Version 1.0.0

    42 downloads

    Years ago, I ran a yearly Halloween BRP Chill game for more then a decade. Here is one of the adventures that I converted to BRP during the playtest. The adventure is only converted by myself, and I do not claim ownership of the material.
  18. Version 1.0.0

    40 downloads

    While I have nothing against the Sanity rules of Call of Cthulhu, I don't think they are necessarily suitable for all horror settings when simulating Fear. Another horror RPG that I believe does it just as well, if not better for my uses, is Pacesetter's Chill. Years ago, I translated the Fear Check rules to BRP for a yearly Halloween BRP Chill game that I ran for more then a decade. Here are those rules, along with the rules for Sensing the Unknown. These rules are written by Michael Williams and only converted by myself. Chill Fear and Sensing the Unknown.pdf
  19. Sometimes during the playtest of BRP, I would get the urge to create a character from the strangest of places. This is one of these situations as creating Erin Esurance stemmed from watching too many television commercials. However, she makes a pretty good BRP character just the same. This is another file that already exists in the Downloads section that I'm linking to here. Rod
  20. While I never owned any of the toys as a kid, The Micronauts was my absolute favorite comic book, and still is to this day. Baron Karza is an absolute bad ass, and was a real challenge to create in BRP. This is another file that already exists in the Downloads section that I'm linking to here. Rod
  21. Oops, I saw that D100 said his "small town in NZ", but my brain saw "NJ" so I thought, New Jersey. Perception roll failed. Rod
  22. You do know that if you order a physical copy directly from the Design Mechanism, you get the PDF for free? No reason to have to wait. Rod
  23. With an exciting year of Classic Fantasy adventures underway, its time to start taking submissions for 2018 to keep the momentum moving. Therefore, we’re putting out another call for writers familiar with both Mythras, Classic Fantasy, and Old School dungeon adventure. Prior writing experience isn’t necessary, if you have some awesome ideas and know how to put them on paper. We’re looking for adventure modules similar to (but not copies of) the classics of old, both in tone and feel, starting and mid-rank adventures are still the most desirable. So, think in terms of Ranks 1 to 2 being low rank, and 3 to 4 being mid. All our Classic Fantasy adventures take place in the World of Greymoor, however, no prior experience with the setting is necessary. You only have to worry about writing an adventure that can be slotted into any high fantasy setting, and I’ll work with you making it fit. The submission should center on a dungeon, tomb, or other ruins, but can feature a significant overland journey if desired. Feel free to include one or two new monsters, magic items, or spells if needed; however, most should be pulled from Classic Fantasy. New monsters, spells, etc., should be fitting of the genre. Finished modules should preferably be 16 or 32 pages. Writers will be paid for their work for submissions that are accepted and published. If any of this sounds interesting to you, feel free to send your proposals to rod.leary -at- thedesignmechanism -dot- com. We’ll send out writer’s guidelines to those proposals that interest us, including a primer for the World of Greymoor. However, we’ll freely answer any comments and general questions in this thread. Rodney Leary
×
×
  • Create New...