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Questbird

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Questbird last won the day on September 21 2015

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About Questbird

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    Melbourne, Australia

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  • RPG Biography
    I played D&D in the 1980s, then switched to Elric! for my long running (20 years+) campaign set in Fritz Leiber's World of Nehwon. I've also played some Call of Cthulhu, mostly as referee. Recently I've been a player in a friend's BRP Classic Fantasy campaign. Other games I've played or refereed are: Cyberpunk, Deadlands, Dragon Warriors, Gamma World, Maelstrom, Mechwarrior, Paranoia, Recon, RIFTS, Shadowrun and Traveller
  • Current games
    Still intermittently running my twenty year old Nehwon campaign with Elric! and some BRP rules (Classic Fantasy, Swords of Cydoria, Rubble and Ruin), also playing in other BRP campaigns, as well as a Dragon Warriors and Warhammer Fantasy Roleplay. I roleplay once a month currently.
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    Melbourne, Australia
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    Hmm.

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  1. Also, to return to 'staple' adventures, although every planet in the galaxy may be 'discovered' It may still be that this particular planet X knows nothing (or not enough) of that remote system Y 30 light years away. Why do they want to know? Scientific studies, a desire to expand, family history, find a new home, or a 'space race' with rivals. Maybe the society on Planet X has been forbidden access to the Galactic Archives for some (t)reason. In any case they will pay for the data. A simple system scan. What could possibly go wrong? Universal knowledge is not...universal 🙃
  2. That's right. An organisation can hire a bunch of freelancers for a hard job, then if they succeed can give them juicier, more lucrative and more sensitive ones. Elite Dangerous had another interesting concept which might be worth exploring. As a reward for completing missions you could choose between different combinations of: - cold hard cash - tradeable goods (maybe rare, maybe usable in other missions) - Reputation with the hiring faction -- you go from neutral to cordial to friendly (or the other way for enemy factions: If you help faction A a lot then faction B may not regard you highly) - Influence. This is an interesting one. This affects how much power Faction A has in a particular system. So if a faction's influence in a system increased enough they could become the local bigwigs. If you happen to be friendly with a group who started as a bunch of borderline terrorists but who now rule the System, it could be very lucrative. In game terms this would mean foregoing the above rewards in favour of increasing the local power of your patron. You help them, they don't pay you so use the money to get stronger themselves. Factions can operate across jurisdictions too, so Faction A might have lots of power in one system but be a new kid on the block on Planet P. But the rewards for doing missions could change that.
  3. If you're PCs are mostly space-bound there are options too. These are inspired by Elite: Dangerous, an open-ended spacefaring game 1. trading - planet X needs a supply of Y. But we don't know where to get Y - take this (harmless!) cargo to Z. Ah, there may be someone who doesn't want it to get there or wants it for themselves - salvage. Pick up this escape pod/illegal goods/remnants of a space battle in sector Q. How do we know it's there? Just a hunch.. - passengers. Transport these nutty demanding tightwad pilgrims safely to planet P without going crazy (thanks Jack Vance!) 2. mercenary/bounty hunting - Faction A is warring with Faction B in system Z. Kill a bunch of Faction A/B's ships for us! You'll be a hero (for our movement) - Take out this particular pirate or space monster who has been hassling traders in system Y. You'll need to track him down first (try the dodgiest bar planetside) - Destroy a target on planet X belonging to Faction B. But watch out for Faction A! - Rob the cargo holds of traders from this lucrative system (hey that's piracy!) Well do it in the name of Moff Tarkin then (OK, that's just privateering, no problem) 3. Exploring - sell data about distant planet P to local planet X - take a scientist or explorer to a distant alien ruin 4. mining - look for the motherlode, an unexploited system with rich deposits. Watch out for other prospectors and pirates
  4. I always forgot about the declaration of intent in reverse DEX order but that is a good idea. It means if you are fast you can see what the opponent is doing and react to it. Although most of my fights were 'he attacks you' or 'he runs away' so the intent didn't vary much. It's an interesting point about moving in combat too, which I certainly never noticed.
  5. I used a slightly more fine-tuned version this idea for my Rolemaster Spell Law conversion. A skill roll, modified by the 'level' of the spell. The same system would work for any collection of spells which has been sorted into 'levels'. The skill or the spell levels could be as fine- or coarse-grained as you like. You could go from one generic 'Magic' skill and a few levels such as 'cantrip (easy), spell (normal), Great Old Spell (difficult)'; to many subclasses of magic skill eg Fire Magic, Healing magic etc and many levels of individual spells. The latter is the approach Spell Law takes.
  6. The AUD exchange rate is a bit of a killer at the moment..but I bought it anyway 🙂
  7. Thanks for posting. I bought the scifi and fantasy versions to have a look. There are lots of BRP-compatible spells, psi powers, equipment and vehicles for those who have been complaining about their lack in core BRP. The professions available are also interesting. The sci fi version has rules for running robots and androids as PCs, as well as various animal-human-hybrid-like aliens. They (the games, not the aliens) are very hefty for the price and clearly a lot of work has gone into their creation.
  8. I think that was the way it worked in Worlds of Wonder and it always made sense to me.
  9. In Elric! the benefits of being a Champion of the Balance were deliberately nerfed because the Balance was so weak in the Young Kingdoms. However I liked it that you could achieve Balance apotheosis only by hard and consistent roleplaying, with the temptations of Law (good skills) and Chaos (easy access to magic) always there. I also loved it that the Champion of the Balance could win the game. In my long Elric! campaign in Nehwon I had one sorcerer become a Champion of Chaos and one Vadagh-like elf become a Champion of Law, but no one ever got near being a Champion of the Balance, though some tried.
  10. Elric! was the game which weaned me permanently off D&D. It was my first and favourite flavour of BRP. It perfectly suited the Nehwon setting which I'd already started playing in. The slim, well-laid out volume was a joy to work with at the table and showed that you could have a full game without having to refer to a pile of tomes. Like @NickMiddleton I give the honorable mention to the Games Workshop Stormbringer 3, with its crazy random character generation and its terrible glue binding.
  11. Like Fire & Sword: d20 -based but basically cut from the same cloth; incidentally a good game with a completely free licence. Now back to more nitpicking about the BRP OGL licence..
  12. I've been painting 28mm sci-fi miniatures with my children, for use with Infinity. It is very relaxing and mindful to sit in the sunshine painting together.
  13. I agree. It is important for a license to be as unambiguous as possible. Future lawyers will argue about the the spirit of the agreement. Some early free and open software licenses (one of the ancestors of things like the OGL and Creative Commons licenses) caused problems down the track because of their language. Even the most robust and well-thought out free software licenses have been through several revisions. It's a great gesture from Chaosium to open up Basic Roleplaying. Many of the constructive criticisms of the published license have been from those who have published good d100-related things before and may do so again with this new license if the legal status of those new works is clear -- to everyone's benefit.
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