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soltakss

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Everything posted by soltakss

  1. Area-wise, mainly. Most of the ones I have seen on maps are very small compared to normal English towns, for example. They would normally fit into a city-centre area in England. Population-wise, I can't remember how big they normally got, but our populations are a lot larger than at any other time, so they don;t really compare. A city of 5,000 people is big in the Bronze Age, a village of 5,000 people in England is unremarkable.
  2. OK, watched it now. It's an interesting documentary, but goes over some tired old ground, Santorini being the Atlantis Myth and not known how they moved a large stone block over half a mile, being just two. The Temple is interesting, as is the fact that the figurines are similar to those found in Iraq, indicating a link between the two, or a more widespread civilisation. What really gets me about Bronze Age cities is how small they are, compared to even modern villages.
  3. The sound on my PC doesn't work, so I can't easily watch it. Also, we all knew that the Bronze Age had cities and a lot of them were built on earlier Neolithic or Bronze Age cities. Troy, Jericho, Jerusalem all had cities built on top of cities. It looks interesting. Maybe I can open it here and then watch it on my phone. Oh, and I liked it, for some positive feedback.
  4. What I do, when running SuperHeroQuest at conventions, is to have each Super Power as a keyword, then have Breakouts to describe things they can do with those Super Powers. So, someone could have Spider Powers (Throw Web, Sticky Web, Swing on Web, Climb up Walls, Spidey Sense) or Spider Powers (Paralysing Venom, Jump at Foe, Cocooning Web, Turn Insides into Mush, Terrify Insects), both describe the powers of a Spider and both describe a very different Super Hero. Someone could also have Move like a Spider and Webbing as different Super Powers, it all depends on how they Players see their Super Hero. In your example, you could have Fastest Woman Alive (Faster than a Speeding Bullet, More Powerful that a Locomotive, and Able to Fly Higher than any Plane), but is your Fastest Woman Alive 10M2 better than Speedy Girl's Fastest Woman Alive 15M3? I tend to encourage generic powers such as Ultra-Fast, so the numeric values determine how good they are with that Super Power. I would have those as Breakouts of a Keyword. So, Ultra Dense (Strong, Bulletproof, Tough, Heavy) might work. Personally, I wouldn't restrict the number of Super Powers, although I normally allow 3 for a convention game, with up to 5 Breakouts. If they haven't finished chargen in 5 minutes, they have to stop adding Breakouts, but can add them later. The Super Powers should reflect the Super Hero they are trying to create. Most Super Heroes are quite simple and have one, or two Super Powers. Even Superman has one main one, Kryptonian (Fly, Laser Beams from Eyes, Freezing Breath, Bulletproof), and a secondary one, Clark Kent (Secret Identity, Journalist, Crush on Lois Lane). Above all, with Super Hero Games, it is important to allow any powers the Player wants. Super Heroes are traditionally unbalanced and some are better at some things than others. Sure, you can impose a 5 point, or even 10 point, penalty on using a Super Power that doesn't really apply, but normally what's the point? What I tend to do is to say that a Super Power can be used to do things that are obviously covered without penalty, can be improvised to do things you have done before at -5, can be improvised to do things you haven't done before at -10 and can use a Breakout without a penalty. So, taking Spiderman as an example, he has Swing on Webs as a Breakout, so he can swing from a skyscraper through the doors of a passing helicopter, at no penalty; could use a web as a parachute at -5 as he has done this before; could use the webs to warn of an enemy's approach with no penalty, as it is something that spiders normally do; or could use the webs to make a protective cocoon when falling out of a plane at -10 as it is the first time he has tried this. For me, the flexibility and narrative elements of HeroQuest make it perfect for Super Hero games.
  5. Maybe these will come with the Jonstown Compendium.
  6. Expect lots of replies to this thread. Where do Ducks normally live? In marshes, on river banks, beside lakes and so on. So, you could have a campaign where you are looking for a certain Duck, for something, so look at all the usual Duck haunts. Duck Point, the Upland Marsh, perhaps Duck Pond and Duck Tower, if you can get hold of the Judges Guild scenarios, along the Creek-Stream-River, along the Zola Fel River in Prax, in Pavis, in the Big Rubble, perhaps in some of the Oases in Prax and the Wastes. Each could have small Duck communities, perhaps proper hamlets, perhaps just bands of Duck bandits or outlaws. The Players might get tired of going from place to place searching for the Duck, but encounters might cause scenarios, so the Campaign could write itself. There are several stereotypes of Duck: The noble Humakti Duck, tied to death and anti-undead The spiteful, nasty, aggressive bandit Duck, outlawed embittered with life and being blamed for Starbrow's Rebellion The wandering Duck, outlawed by the Lunars and desperately trying to escape them and settle down to a quiet life Adventurer Ducks, trying to prove that they are every bit as good as other Adventurers, trying extra-hard to do things Delecti's Ducks, who live in the Upland Marsh, live a quiet life, dodge undead and don't cause any problems You can use those stereotypes to change PCs' expectations of Ducks and even to drive scenarios. If you can get hold of it, have a look at Duck Pond and Duck Tower, you can get a lot of mileage out of those. Also, search the Internet for Duck Scenarios, there are a few around, I seem to remember Escape from Duck point being one of them. You can fold those into a campaign relatively easily. There was a Duck Pack for Mongoose RQ, in fact there were two, one Gloranthan and one non-Gloranthan, they are good for ideas, if you can get hold of them. You could have a campaign structured around getting hold of some ancient Duck Artefacts, perhaps to bring back Grandfather Duck. I am not keen on the Hueymakt or Storm Bill depictions of Duck Deities, but PCs could get Artefacts that allow Ducks to join certain cults. They are also bitter and spiteful, willing to backstab any humans to escape. Mean, ornery critters, that's what Ducks are.
  7. Because Glorantha is magical, sometimes you don't even need to have sex.
  8. Yes and No, the classic Gloranthan answer. Yes, HeroQuestors can travel to those points and participate in them, as they are mythical nodes in God Time as well as events in History. No, HeroQuestors cannot change History, as that has already happened. So, a HeroQuestor could not go back to when Gbaji cursed the trolls and prevent the Curse of Kin from happening, so all Trollkin wink out of existence, but can stop Trollkin from being born from the time the effects take place. All HeroQuests have an effect and the effect starts from when the HeroQuest ends in current time. Where the HeroQuest takes part in the God Time, the HeroQuest produces a change in the God Plane that can be accessed by HeroQuestors after that point. If you wanted to, you could have a HeroQuest that has an effect on the past. I did this in my last Gloranthan Campaign, when a PC HeroQuested into God Time to make a very minor change, then when the PCs went into a Deep Earth Temple in Esrolia, they found an idol there that had always been there, but nobody knew who it was, so the PC who HeroQuested identified the idol as being herself.
  9. It;s a game of averages and chance. If most of your opponents to 1d6+1 damage, then you can survive with little armour. Even 1d8+1+2d2 does 4.5 on average, so light armour is pretty effective half the time. Don't forget that you ignore any wounds below your Toughness, so someone with 4 APs and 6 toughness needs a 10-point wound to cause a damaging wound, that is near maximum damage for most weapons and Might. Of course, advantages and high damage rolls can cause problems, as can armour with less coverage, so the APs don't count. I would prefer low APs with 100% coverage than high APs with 20% coverage.
  10. Does he spin around if you pull his tail?
  11. We played that Glue affected undead as well as living creatures, as they are not, technically, dead.
  12. I make 2000 generations of humans approximately 60,000 years! If the Second Age is between the end of Gbaji and the Dragonkill, that is about 600 years, or roughly 20 generations, at 30 years per generation. From the Dragonkill to current Glorantha is 500 years, or around 17 generations. That is still a long time, plenty of time to forget things.
  13. Yes, originally, the God Learners took the Malkioni Scriptures and went through them, almost line by line, working out which were true scriptures and which had non-Malkioni influence. They produced the Abiding Book as a result, unless that was the one that write itself out of thin air. The tricky bit was when they tried to find new ways to differentiate between true Malkioni and non-Malkioni influences, as some of it looked very similar. So, they used non-Malkioni techniques, probably reasoning that if they could do something using non-Malkioni techniques then it wasn't true Malkioni and could be removed. The deeper they looked, the more they got sucked in, until they mostly concentrated on the non-Malkioni stuff. Eventually, they categorised the non-Malkioni material in the same way as they did Malkioni material. I like the description of the first God Learner HeroQuestors. They found a way into the Storm Realm and sent experimental HeroQuestors there, but none came back. So, they sent a small party of HeroQuestors and none came back. Then they sent a dozen HeroQuestors and none came back, then twenty, then fifty, then a hundred HeroQuestors and one came back, barely alive, to tell their tale. Success!
  14. I'm coming round to the idea that the Clay Mostali were made using the Man Rune, so they are "descended" from Grandfather Mortal.
  15. Dwarves don't have gender so this one is a question. They're chipped out of mineral. Not according to the hilarious section about Dwarf Reproduction in Elder Secrets. There is a lot more written about Glorantha than is in HeroQuest or RQG. I tend to use all the sources I have.
  16. In case you haven't seen it, Merrie England: Robyn Hode has Golems. Golem Created by Holy Men, a golem is an animated clay shape, normally in humanoid form, either inscribed with magical words or with words inscribed on parchment in the creator's blood. Golems are mindless servants, capable of following simple verbal instructions, or more detailed instructions written on the parchment that animated them. Golems cannot speak and this is one way of determining if a creature is a golem. Characteristic Attribute d6/d8 Location AP/Cov AP/Cov Toughness STR 17 5d6 Size Class L 1 R Leg –/– 5/0+ 8 CON - - Might +4 2 L Leg –/– 5/0+ 8 DEX 7 2d6 Strike Rank 12 3,7,8 Torso –/– 5/0+ 9 INT 6 6 Encumbrance – 4 R Arm –/– 5/0+ 7 WIL 7 2d6 Life Points n/a 5 L Arm –/– 5/0+ 7 CHA Move 6 6 Head –/– 5/0+ 8 Weapon SR SR to ATT/Def Damage Parry Special Fist 12 3/– 1d4+4d2 – crush Trample 12 3/– 4d2 – crush Skills: Agility [Brawn] 37%, Perception [Track] 43%, Stealth [Appear as Statue, Hide] 47% Armour: Stone skin (5/0+) Powers: Immunity to Disease, Pain, Poison and Bleeding Notes: As an automaton, the golem has no Life Points and does not suffer from incapacitation if a limb is destroyed. Only complete demolition of the head or torso will stop it. Any Medium-sized opponent is at -2 to Strike Rank when fighting a Golem. The creature’s Brawn Trait increases its Might as though its average STR was 1 point higher. A golem has a magical word written on part of its body, normally its head. If that word is removed, the golem becomes deactivated. Some golems have a magical inscription written on calf parchment placed in their mouths that contains the golem's instructions.
  17. AFAIK they just... married. You might know more than I do. I thought that Pavis himself was the result of HeroQuesting to create a human-elf hybrid. However, Pavis had 7 Daughters, one was a Half-Dwarf, the others being mainly Humahn and a but Elfy. As far as I know, those were the result of normal breeding, not HeroQuesting. The Half-Dwarf might have been the result of HeroQuesting, where Pavis got to ground his mortar in someone's pestle.
  18. Nor do we! Such things tend to generate pages of minutiae, where many people offer their opinions but nobody is any clearer at the end.
  19. Round Houses would be good for Solar types, or Darkness types. maybe the style of the roof decoration indicates whether they follow Fire/Sky, Light, Heat or Darkness.
  20. On a HeroQuest. One of our PCs had a BattleCat, which was basically a tiger that he could ride. It was an allied spirit as well, which was handy.
  21. I imagine it to be in the mountains, just because I imagine all winged humanoids, who are not angels or demons, to live in mountains. All the better to swoop down on their enemies.
  22. They are actually trollkin, by the multiple birth definition of trollkin. However, they should be able to go through the Rebirth Ritual, to become full trolls, fairly easily.
  23. At those ages, an extra year makes little difference. i'm still almost as rubbish as when I first started.
  24. I just have it that Eurmal turned the blood of the slain healers in Healer Valley to beer and she drank it until she passed out. So, really, Eurmal could be a Brewer deity. one of his spells might have been Blood Beer, that turns blood into beer, but I can't remember.
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