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Eurmali heroquest ideas


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So I'm running a HeroQuest Glorantha game set (for now) in Esrolia, fighting Wolf Pirates, Horse-Spawn raiders, and Lunar mercenaries trying to carve a realm out of the Holy Country. To help with the backstories, I used the family history generator (with some modifications) from RuneQuest Glorantha. My players are: 

  • The obligatory scheming Earth priestess who wants to be Queen
  • A Death-sworn Duck who wants revenge against the Lunar general who slew his clan
  • A Praxian nomad and expert archer, exiled from his people for crimes of foul sorcery
  • And an Esrolian trickster whose tragic family backstory gives him a serious grudge against Lunars and Wolf Pirates. 

In a bout of "yes, and"-ing, my players have decided that the best thing to do to safeguard Esrolia from being ravaged by bloodthirsty foreigners is to stop Harrek the Berserk from killing his way up and down the country with nothing to stop him, and I've decided to let them try, with the expectation that unless things go perfectly right, they're all going to die horrible horrible deaths. 

The point of this question is: the trickster player said that he loved the idea of heroquesting (he's brand new to Glorantha and loves the concept of reenacting a god's story/becoming a god to gain some magical benefit, and how wrong it might go--we both enjoy chaos at the table), and all the players love the idea that it's the trickster, of all people, who can come up with something to stop (or at least slow down) the most lethal person in the world. 

Again, through a bout of "yes, and"ing, the Eurmali player came up with a myth titled: "How Eurmal Stole The Infinity Rune (And Then Forgot Where He Put It)," but couldn't for the life of him come up with any idea of what the story would entail, and left that to me. 

love this idea.


What in the hell kind of structure would that heroquest have? I'm drawing a lot of blanks, here. 

 

Any ideas?

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23 minutes ago, ZedAlpha said:

Again, through a bout of "yes, and"ing, the Eurmali player came up with a myth titled: "How Eurmal Stole The Infinity Rune (And Then Forgot Where He Put It)," but couldn't for the life of him come up with any idea of what the story would entail, and left that to me. 

Sometimes all you need for a HeroQuest is a good title and Players who want to do it.

24 minutes ago, ZedAlpha said:

What in the hell kind of structure would that heroquest have?

There are several ways you could do it, with probably more that I can't think of:

  • Traditional: You take a myth, break it down into segments, or stations, then run the HeroQuest as a magical scenario covering those Stations.
  • Improvised: You take a myth and just run it as a scenario without putting in too much thought as to how the different segments hang together
  • Seat of your Pants: You go onto the Hero Plan and the GM and Players simply tell you what is happening while making it up as you go along
  • Scary: You go onto the Hero Plan and the GM simply tells you what is happening while making it up as you go along

The difference between Seat of Your Pants and Scary is that the Players do some of the driving in Seat of Your Pants, but in Scary they are just dragged along.

As you don't have a Myth to use, Seat of Your Pants and Scary seem like the best options.

You could always do something similar to the Limerick Game that the Goons used to play, where one starts off a limerick with one line and the others contribute a line and see what they get at the end. It produced the following gem: "There was a young man from Bombay, Who on a Slow Boat to China one day, Was trapped at the tiller, By a sex-crazed gorilla, And China's a bloody long way!" So, each of your Players could contribute a line or sentence to the myth and you could use that.

As for how the HeroQuest works, Secrets of HeroQuesting goes into that in some detail, as do Arcane Lore, 13th Age in Glorantha, Six Seasons in Sartar and various other supplements.

I wouldn't make an Eurmali HeroQuest any different from any other HeroQuest, except that Eurmal has no rules and doesn't mind breaking a HeroQuest. 

The important thing is to know, as a GM, what the end results of the HeroQuest are. So, Eurmal steals the Infinity Rune then loses it. so, does Eurmal gain powers from that? Does Eurrmal give powers to someone else? Does Eurmal gain powers from the events of the HeroQuest? as they are trying to stop Harrek, do they find the Infinity Rune and give it away to someone else, making them a Super Hero who can stop Harrek? Maybe one of the Adventurers gets the Infinity Rune? Maybe it's one of their enemies?

13th Age in Glorantha has the idea of Complications that you get when you do a HeroQuest, that might be a good way of doing things. 

 

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This being a Eurmali heroquest, things may turn out a lot sillier than those of the more stodgy deities. Feats like "Oh look, a squirrel" or "I got a hole in my pocket" may feature.

 

One fun question is, whose Infinity rune got stolen? As a tongue-in-cheek suggestion, why not Hykim and Mikyh's? The twin dragons are always represented with two Beast Runes rather than Beast and Infinity, like e.g. Flamal, the origin of the Plant Rune. Your quest may explain why.

The theft may involve something like "your brother sent me to bring him your shared Infinity rune, urgently, or the mating with Mother Mammal will go wrong. Possibly tying into the birth of the Camel myth, where Mother Mammal being exposed to the Trickster results in that most unlikely of herd beasts.

Maybe stealing it from Ratslaff himself, but that experience may leave the party Boggled, in a nightmarish toon story.

 

Losing the rune might involve the web of Arachne Solara, and some silliness. Perhaps Eurmal getting bored during the Ritual of the Net and anchoring his string of the net to the rune, going off to doze or booze.

The Ritual of the Net is of course a station of the Lightbringers' quest, an easy invite for some more serious cult member roles. They could still see the silly and brutal underbelly of the LBQ, then. Seducing the guardian of the Gates of Dusk, in a joint effort, getting eaten without dying, crossing the bridge of Swords and taking a dive in that river (borrowing from the Eleven Lights quest write-up in that book), seducing and killing the son of the Only Old One in the depths of the Obsidian Palace, disturbing the peace while Orlanth undergoes the Flames of Ehilm, etc.

The Sourcebook offers glimpses at those myths. Make a parody out of that.

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5 hours ago, ZedAlpha said:

Again, through a bout of "yes, and"ing, the Eurmali player came up with a myth titled: "How Eurmal Stole The Infinity Rune (And Then Forgot Where He Put It)," but couldn't for the life of him come up with any idea of what the story would entail, and left that to me. 

love this idea.

What in the hell kind of structure would that heroquest have? I'm drawing a lot of blanks, here. 

I think the story of how Eurmal saved the healers from Babeester Gor has a lot of resonance here with the coming of Harrek.  This short version from the Babeester Gor writeup in Sartar Companion (p.250):  "[Babeester] remained celibate, ruthless, murderous, unsociable, and terrifying. She painted her face and lower limbs black, and other colors for specific tasks. She was merciless and cruel. Once she slew so many defenseless residents of Healing Valley that she waded breast-deep in the gore, drinking the blood of victory and slaughter. Eurmal saved some of the healers when he turned the blood to beer, which Babeester Gor drank to blissful oblivion."

There's likely a good heroquest link between Esrolia and the Healing Valley.  And what better than a glorious drinking bout to forget where you put an Infinity Rune?

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Taking another HeroQuest and getting Eurmal invited along, or gatecrashing it might work as well. 

5 hours ago, Joerg said:

The Sourcebook offers glimpses at those myths. Make a parody out of that.

Looking at a myth and parodying it is a good idea and could easily work.

Having Eurmal steal an infinity rune and it turning into a snake that is eating itself but opens up and crawls up his sleeve or up his trouser leg is always good for a laugh.

It is worth thinking about what an Infinity Rune looks like:

  • Is it said snake? 
  • Is it a mobius loop that Eurmal needs to find the end of?
  • Is it connected to the Eighth Lightbringer or the Eighth Mother?
  • Is it a pair of magician's rings locked together?
  • Is it a pair of handcuffs used to capture Eurmal? (Shades of Who Framed Roger Rabbit, with him slipping out of the handcuffs, could you always do that? Only when it was funny).
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Oh wow, all of this is awesome. Thank you so much!

 I actually had to look up who the dragons you mentioned were (to my shame, all of my experience gaming in Glorantha before this campaign comes from King of Dragon Pass and Six Ages), but I love the idea that he originally stole it from the god-dragons at the beginning of time, or maybe Ratslaff the Primal Trickster, then used it to power all of his shenanigans in the more absurd myths, like stealing Death over and over again, putting Babeester Gor to sleep, or surviving during the Darkness until he was dragged along by Orlanth, then "forgetting where he put it" by using it to anchor his strand of Arachne Solara's net and just running away to go do Eurmal things. 

As far as benefits go, one of the players--the Duck's player--recommended that the best-case scenario is gaining very temporary, one-time access to the Infinity Rune to do some, quote, "Absurd Looney-Tunes-level magical jank" to someone who deserves the Trickster's ire. 

anyway, with all these ideas I've got a rough idea of the structure of the myth...

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  1. Eurmal steals the Infinity Rune from Ratslaff, causing that deity to be mostly forgotten by mortals, OR he tricks one of the Beast Father Twins into giving him their infinity rune. In the process, he sees the true absurd nature of the universe, becomes very briefly Illuminated, and sees the true shape of all events to come. In this station, the rune would appear as the World Serpent, or Ratslaff's magician's rings. 
  2. Eurmal uses the Rune to help himself steal Death again and again and again to help copy Death itself from one weapon into multiple smaller weapons with the same power of the original. In this, the Rune appears as a sideways eight, as in "eight copies of death," which is a lazy cop-out, but Eurmal is all about lazy cop-outs.
  3. Eurmal uses the Infinity Rune to get Babeester Gor so drunk that she momentarily stops murdering the entire world. In this station, the Infinity Rune is two drinking bowls being clinked together in a toast. 
  4. Eurmal uses the Infinity Rune to bind a chaos beast during the Darkness so that Urox can slay it. Later, he's goaded into using it to bind himself in Sorceror's Town, then Orlanth browbeats the trickster into coming along with the Lightbringers' Quest; here, it appears as a pair of "but only when it's funny" handcuffs. 
  5. Eurmal uses the Infinity Rune to murder the son of the Only Old One, and learns the lesson that "Infinite power isn't fun because you don't ever get challenged," then "Some jokes just aren't funny" in the aftermath of dodging the consequences of his horrific act. Here, the Infinity Rune is a garotte. 
  6. Eurmal, recalling his Illumination, sees that Arachne Solara needs more power to come into being, and uses his Rune to anchor his strand of the Net, giving Arachne Solara the Rune. Then he just leaves, his part done. Here, it goes back to appearing as the World Serpent or Ratslaff's magician rings. 

    I relish the idea of the Duck playing Humakt in the second station, the Ernaldan being Babeester Gor, and the Praxian probably pretending to be a sorceror in Sorceror's Town who tricks a power-mad (and therefore more stupid than usual) Eurmal into binding himself with his own cuffs. 

    Does this sound good as a rough structure?
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52 minutes ago, ZedAlpha said:

he sees the true absurd nature of the universe, becomes very briefly Illuminated

Or is driven mad by the vision (much like Flesh Man)....

53 minutes ago, ZedAlpha said:

Eurmal uses the Rune to help himself steal Death again and again and again

This could be the natural outcome of being driven mad - an insane devotion to the idea of ending it all... because it just NEVER ENDS!!!  (Think of the movie Groundhog Day, stuck in an infinite loop, and always waking up again at the same point.)

56 minutes ago, ZedAlpha said:

Does this sound good as a rough structure?

I might play up more of the absurdity of the infinite - particularly as something to torment the Trickster with so that he may in fact want (or desperately want) to get rid of the Infinity Rune.  But it just clings to him, drawing all sorts of unwanted attention (spirits flock to him trying to get a piece of the infinite, gods ambush him trying to get it, etc.).  It may even loop him into the Great Compromise even if he was planning something else (like cutting it up so he could at last escape).  

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Eurmal somehow captures Harrek in the Infinity Rune, subjecting Harrek to a dizzying roller coaster of space and time. As long as Eurmal holds on to the Rune, Harrek's trapped. But then Eurmal is distracted and puts the Infinity Rune down somewhere and forgets about it. Meanwhile, Harrek (being a demigod) is able to escape, but ends up reentering the world both a) far away from Esrolia, and b) in an embarrassing and/or compromising position. He's pissed and he has a vague sense that some poor schmuck he's never met before (*insert Eurmali character here*) is responsible for his humiliation. Esrolia is saved, but the Eurmali is now being hunted by Harrek and his Wolf Pirates. Eventually the bill will come due. 

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14 hours ago, ZedAlpha said:

Rune appears as a sideways eight, as in "eight copies of death,"

Which is on its side because he's drunk too much and fell over.

Edited by Stephen L
That spelling thing, the error unfortunately immortalised in jajagappa quote below
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2 hours ago, jajagappa said:

Or is driven mad by the vision (much like Flesh Man)....

This could be the natural outcome of being driven mad - an insane devotion to the idea of ending it all... because it just NEVER ENDS!!!  (Think of the movie Groundhog Day, stuck in an infinite loop, and always waking up again at the same point.)

I might play up more of the absurdity of the infinite - particularly as something to torment the Trickster with so that he may in fact want (or desperately want) to get rid of the Infinity Rune.  But it just clings to him, drawing all sorts of unwanted attention (spirits flock to him trying to get a piece of the infinite, gods ambush him trying to get it, etc.).  It may even loop him into the Great Compromise even if he was planning something else (like cutting it up so he could at last escape).  

adore this

Maybe it's just because I read too much Kill Six Billion Demons (and that webcomic is honestly informing how I view Glorantha in a big way), but I see Eurmal stealing the Infinity rune and finally seeing the absurd, circular, meaningless shape of the God Time with it: an unending story, rendered meaningless by a lack of a true ending. Just acausal myths being told and retold, lived and relived, without any stopping point. In his madness, some part of him seeks Death, then seeks Babeester Gor, then just does crazy, awful stuff during the Darkness because nothing matters, then he learns that yeah, it does matter and rejoins the Lightbringers in the Underworld. 

Then that ties into the birth of Arachne Solara! It's his greatest prank: breaking the circle by causing infinity to end. Trapping all the other gods (and himself) in the God Time forever, ending the world by giving birth to another one. He gives Arachne Solara the Infinity rune, causing her to have the power to create and enforce the Compromise, then he just pisses off to, I don't know...relive the myth where he momentarily seduces Elmal or something. 

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2 hours ago, Beoferret said:

Eurmal somehow captures Harrek in the Infinity Rune, subjecting Harrek to a dizzying roller coaster of space and time. As long as Eurmal holds on to the Rune, Harrek's trapped. But then Eurmal is distracted and puts the Infinity Rune down somewhere and forgets about it. Meanwhile, Harrek (being a demigod) is able to escape, but ends up reentering the world both a) far away from Esrolia, and b) in an embarrassing and/or compromising position. He's pissed and he has a vague sense that some poor schmuck he's never met before (*insert Eurmali character here*) is responsible for his humiliation. Esrolia is saved, but the Eurmali is now being hunted by Harrek and his Wolf Pirates. Eventually the bill will come due. 

that could work, but this group won't settle for less than absolutely murdering Harrek. I'll give this as a second prize if they can't pull it off.

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10 minutes ago, ZedAlpha said:

then he learns that yeah, it does matter and rejoins the Lightbringers in the Underworld. 

Actually he hangs himself, and unfortunately Orlanth cuts him down and "saves" him.  Eurmal gets his revenge in the Underworld.  But maybe somewhere there he finds that maybe it might matter (or finds that he can actually do something different - or so he thinks).  (Of course, everyone thinks that Arachne Solara gives birth to Time because she ate the Devil.  Eurmal knows the Truth of that one! 😉 )

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5 minutes ago, jajagappa said:

Actually he hangs himself, and unfortunately Orlanth cuts him down and "saves" him.  Eurmal gets his revenge in the Underworld.  But maybe somewhere there he finds that maybe it might matter (or finds that he can actually do something different - or so he thinks).  (Of course, everyone thinks that Arachne Solara gives birth to Time because she ate the Devil.  Eurmal knows the Truth of that one! 😉 )

Hm. That could work too. Orlanth “saves” him (dooms him to a circular existence), so he betrays him in the Underworld and learns that Some Jokes Just Aren’t Funny and that If Nothing Means Anything, Then Everything Has Meaning If I Say It Does, and finally escapes through Arachne Solara.

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The duck could find an enchanted sword, then the trickster could steal it and give it away to a passing Orlanthi. Trickster keeps stumbling across the sword bearer, stealing it, and giving it away to someone else, taunting the duck who is under a cult obligation to find it but keeps missing their opportunity. If the trickster doesn't steal the sword when presented with each opportunity, their life is in danger - the sword bearer (or axe bearer or club wielder) has a dream that their only hope of keeping their marvellous new weapon is to kill the trickster who gave it to them. 

Trickster's reward - heroic use of some trickster spells (i.e. cast as if they are spirit magic).

Duck's reward - when they finally get the sword back, its an avatar of death - sever spirit every time it penetrates armour.

Everyone elses reward - Harrek decides to withdraw. The recipients of the sword became skilled death dealers, rune lords of their cults, leaders of the defence, because they participated in a little way in one of the founding heroquests of Glorantha. When Harrek attacks, his forces suffer an unusual number of casualties, and his heroic sense suggests that the captains of those who oppose him have been magically blessed with the ability to deal death with unusual skill. Better to withdraw and wait another season, until those who are causing so much trouble have moved on.

Edited by EricW
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I have never seen so many critical successes or fails in any game for any system.

Here's how it shook out in game: 

  • The heroes went to an obscure urban shrine of Eurmal, dedicated to an  equally obscure sect: Eurmal the Lucid, an aspect of Eurmal in his role as the trickster with startling clarity on events. There, the Earth Priestess seduced the shrine's keeper, allowing the party trickster to learn the myth How Eurmal Stole the Infinity Rune
     
  • There was a hilarious in-character discussion about whether or not they should allow a vengeance-mad trickster who keeps making little "stabbing effigies," basically tiny voodoo dolls, of people who have slighted him in the past, to gain infinite power even for a second. In the end, it was decided that this was probably the only way they could kill Harrek. 
     
  • The quest began: Trickster took some very fun mushrooms and went into a religious trance as his spirit entered the God Time. He was led into the shrine's hidden cellar and made his first choice: he'd steal the infinity rune from the Beast Father Twins; in the mortal world, he was led into a stable, where he had a very heated argument with a passing Praxian mercenary's rhinoceros. Meanwhile in the God Time, he tricked Hykim into letting him "borrow" his Infinity Rune, and then ran away with it. 
     
  • One of the players brought up how this would probably make him Illuminated, and that Illumination drives people bugnuts. The Trickster critically failed a test to "keep it together on a cosmic scale," and is now hopelessly insane. It turns out that glimpsing the true, meaningless, fictive absurdity of Creation is bad for your health! Who knew?
     
  • At the next station, the Duck (playing the role of Humakt) chased the Trickster throughout the town, where he flawlessly duplicated Death over and over and over in a mad rush to, as Jagajappa suggested, "make it all end," because the myth just wouldn't end. In the real world, the Duck got into a fight with a Redsmith over who had ownership of all the swords, spearheads, axeheads, and falx blades that were being duplicated Loaves and Fishes-style in his smithy. Duck got called an "impertinent feathery little beast," then proceeded to break both of the smith's arms. A critical success with the Duck's trait Unexpectedly Terrifying (tied to his Death rune) had the smith's apprentice make a generous gift of an enchanted shield to the Duck in the hopes that he and his very intoxicated friend with the glowing eyes would just go away. 
     
  • Meanwhile, the Earth Priestess had to pay off the city watchmen to not try and arrest the trickster after the Trickster, running away from "Humakt," caused a small stampede of livestock to cause a distraction. 
     
  • At the next station, the Earth Priestess then took on the role of Babeester Gor, and decided to contact that goddess directly to play the part right. There was a critical failure. A rather rude pack of bureaucrats who took issue with the heroquest going on in their city may or may not have been messily eviscerated by the Always Angry Goddess here incarnated in a small, fat priestess of Ernalda. Things kind of went off the rails here for a second as the Earth Priestess started to go on a rampage, but true to the myth, the Trickster got her drunker than drunk and used his magic to pin all the blame on a nearby Lunar sorceress who was shopping for reagents in the market square. 
     
  • Hilarity Ensued. There were few survivors. 
     
  • At the next station, the Praxian Sorcerer took on the role of the Sorcerer's Town people and tried to convince the Trickster to bind himself with his own rune, but the Trickster was too wily and ran away. The Quest threatened to fail--the corrupting power of Infinite Illumination was blasting the Trickster's mind away, and he was planning on just magically nuking the city they were in with the power of the Rune in a mad gambit to make it all end. A bare success to stave off cosmic suicide led him to try and commit actual suicide, which led to the next station. 
     
  • The Trickster disappeared entirely from the material world, reappearing in the God Plane as Orlanth cut him from his noose, which was the Infinity Rune. Orlanth bound the Trickster to him for the duration of the Lightbringer's Quest and dragged him to the Underworld. Unwilling to face continued existence, the Trickster dutifully performed his role but plotted revenge.
     
  • Meanwhile, back in the real world, there was a pitched battle in the city's market square between the Lunar sorceress, the other members of her mercenary company that had been contracted to protect the city from Wolf Pirates, the local guards trying to arrest her, the Praxian rhino-rider (who turned out to be a devotee of Storm Bull and was itching for a chance to kill some Lunars), and the Duck, who was racing the Praxian to murder the Lunar first. The Praxian Sorcerer and the Earth Priestess hid in a tavern and got even more drunk, waiting for this to blow over.
     
  • In the Underworld, the Trickster came to his senses after strangling the son of the Only Old One, thus breaking hospitality and dooming the Lightbringers. He successfully learned the lessons Some Jokes Just Aren't Funny after trying to amuse Issairies with a "humorous" depiction of what he'd done. There in the hopelessness of the Lightbringers, he realized that, well...nothing matters. Nothing matters at all. The God Time is an unending circular existence, doomed to repeat itself ad nauseum, and then the Darkness would eat it into pure nothingness. I had one last check for the heroquest, which the Trickster knocked out of the park, on a critical success with his breakout trait "Eurmal the Lucid cultist." He aced it, and accepted the lesson: "If Everything Is Meaningless, Then Everything Has Meaning If I Say It Does.
     
  • Trickster reunited the Lightbringers, and tied the Infinity Rune to his part of Arachne Solara's net, giving the nascent goddess infinite power, and then tricking the other gods into locking themselves into the God Time forever. After the Great Time Prank was pulled, Trickster found himself forgetting that he ever even had infinite power, and came back to the material world...
     
  • In the middle of a three-way swordfight. Using some of the magical powers he had just gained from becoming Eurmal, the Trickster made everyone as drunk as Babeester Gor, and pinned the blame for the fight on the Wolf Pirates. 
     

It was a hell of a fun session. We decided that he'd be able to call upon the Infinity Rune's power once before he forgot it entirely: phenomenal cosmic power is not meant for this world, and it might just destroy him in the process, but the players all think this is fair. In the end, they had to skip town before the Trickster's magic wore off. They're on the road now, aiming to murder Harrek the Berserk or die trying. 

Our next session won't be for several weeks but I look forward to ending this story one way or the other. 

Thanks for all the input, guys!

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30 minutes ago, ZedAlpha said:

I have never seen so many critical successes or fails in any game for any system.

That's what happens when you play with Trickster! 😉

30 minutes ago, ZedAlpha said:

It turns out that glimpsing the true, meaningless, fictive absurdity of Creation is bad for your health! Who knew?

Don't say I didn't warn you!  He probably discovered that the world was created in the mind of someone named Greg.

32 minutes ago, ZedAlpha said:

the Duck (playing the role of Humakt) chased the Trickster throughout the town, where he flawlessly duplicated Death over and over and over in a mad rush to, as Jagajappa suggested, "make it all end," because the myth just wouldn't end.

Cool!

34 minutes ago, ZedAlpha said:

There was a critical failure. A rather rude pack of bureaucrats who took issue with the heroquest going on in their city may or may not have been messily eviscerated by the Always Angry Goddess here incarnated in a small, fat priestess of Ernalda. Things kind of went off the rails here for a second as the Earth Priestess started to go on a rampage

Nothing like some bureaucrats to set off Babeester Gor...

38 minutes ago, ZedAlpha said:

It was a hell of a fun session. We decided that he'd be able to call upon the Infinity Rune's power once before he forgot it entirely: phenomenal cosmic power is not meant for this world, and it might just destroy him in the process, but the players all think this is fair. In the end, they had to skip town before the Trickster's magic wore off. They're on the road now, aiming to murder Harrek the Berserk or die trying. 

That sounds like a wonderfully fun session!  And what could possibly go wrong at this point?!

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Yeah, I showed Trickster's player this thread so he could figure out how he wanted to improvise his way through the myth, and really liked your take on a lot of the ideas. We all had a blast detailing how his character saw the fourth wall, and the Duck's player, who's the oldest one of us and REALLY into British comedy, quoted Blackadder when the Trickster got Illuminated: "As private parts to the Gods are we: they play with us for their amusement!"

There was like half a swearing hour given over to Deadpool jokes and wondering if we should just switch to playing Toon for the rest of the campaign.

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2 minutes ago, Runeblogger said:

Standing ovation!!! 👏👏👏👏👏👏
Maybe when they use the Infinity Rune against Harrek he becomes the Bear God and is therefore forever secluded in Godtime?

That's actually precisely where I was wanting to guide the resolution to this, but the players like the idea of locking him in an infinite Groundhog Day time loop, stealing all of his powers, or just disintegrating him. Trickster player was thinking about literally dropping a giant anvil on his head.

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57 minutes ago, ZedAlpha said:

by the way, if anyone wants to steal this idea for a Eurmali myth for their own Gloranthae, please do and let me know how it turns out.

This sounds like amazing fun.

I have an ongoing series of Glorantha fiction and this myth would be perfect for the Trickster character eventually.

Also, how did the Praxian become a sorceror?  Or was he just accused of it?

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