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How to Get the Younguns


soltakss

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As far as how to get young gamers into the game, that is worth it's own thread.

I was young when I started playing RuneQuest way back when. Someone on our block of residence floor said he played a game that sounded interesting and I was hooked. So, I haven't got a clue how to attract younguns.

A tube of smarties with every purchase?

Simon Phipp - Caldmore Chameleon - Wallowing in my elitism since 1982. Many Systems, One Family. Just a fanboy. 

www.soltakss.com/index.html

Jonstown Compendium author. Find my contributions here

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In my case, I was dissatisfied with AD&D and RQ was the alternative FRPG at the time. Now, it is not so cut & dried.

I think we'd need to get their attention. Back in the old days, it was one of a handful of non D&D RPGS on the shelf. Now it would have to fight with other RPGs to get noticed.

A BRP-Lite and some free adventures, maybe even a SoloQuest or two could help. A soloQuest PDF would give potential GM's a taste, and it is GMs who we need to get. Generally if someone is willing to run, players will be willing to try it.

If we could get 4 or 5 contributors and turn it into a nice and free PDF and have one of the semi-professional people put it up as free DL at someplace like DriveThru and/or RPG Now then the game would get some exposure.

Chaos stalks my world, but she's a big girl and can take of herself.

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A couple of things in addition to what Atgxtg suggested come to mind, all probably pretty obvious.

Being friendly, approachable and visible on various on-line forums (as in RL of course...).

Running games at conventions and on-line.

We've mentioned it a few times and I agree with Atgxtg that a BRP Lite is likely to be very useful, especially for on-line games.

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If we could get 4 or 5 contributors and turn it into a nice and free PDF and have one of the semi-professional people put it up as free DL at someplace like DriveThru and/or RPG Now then the game would get some exposure.

Absolutely agree with this - putting some kind of free PDF with some decent and evocative artwork if poss on DriveThru (etc) is an excellent idea. Especially if Jason (or somebody) produces a BRP Lite available that way too. I'd be happy to drum up an introductory scenario - FRP or "Gamma World" type preferably - or some rulesy type stuff or some critters to contribute to the War Effort.

This would probably need to be coordinated with Chaosium for licensing issues, timing, etc, no?

Also fan-sites. I'm thinking of putting something up in the next 6 months or so for my own campaign world.

Cheers,

Sarah

"The Worm Within" - the first novel for The Chronicles of Future Earth, coming 2013 from Chaosium, Inc.

Website: http://sarahnewtonwriter.com | Twitter: @SarahJNewton | Facebook: TheChroniclesOfFutureEarth

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Just occurred to me - and a vaguely relevant tangent - does anyone know what happened to "Different Worlds"? Looks like it pegged out in 1987 at issue #47, but there's a Different Worlds Publications - Home website that does back issues and sort of relevant stuff. Does it still live, I wonder?

"The Worm Within" - the first novel for The Chronicles of Future Earth, coming 2013 from Chaosium, Inc.

Website: http://sarahnewtonwriter.com | Twitter: @SarahJNewton | Facebook: TheChroniclesOfFutureEarth

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It pegged out. But Nick Middleton is very keen to start a new zine: Uncounted Worlds that I think could be exactly what is needed. I know Nick is keen to solicit input and submissions:

Uncounted Worlds | d100.org

Sounds very cool. A new zine covering all the many possible incarnations of BRP would be great.

Incidentally, the name reminds me of a great quote I always loved - "Worlds without number have I created..." I always wondered where it came from, then decided to google it one day, only to find it's from Joe Smith's Mormon scriptures... Which was kind of a surprise. :shocked:

I still think it's a cool quote though...

"The Worm Within" - the first novel for The Chronicles of Future Earth, coming 2013 from Chaosium, Inc.

Website: http://sarahnewtonwriter.com | Twitter: @SarahJNewton | Facebook: TheChroniclesOfFutureEarth

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I honestly think the best way to get the younguns is to do the first ever video game/p&p rpg tie-in. Then sell it at video game stores as a sourcebook/stand-alone p&p rpg game. It'll be just like what game companies already do for movie and television series. If you could get a video game franchise sourcebook, plus BRP rules, plus something like the Mythic Game Master Emulator Mythic Game Master Emulator all in one package, that would get tons of new, younger people to play the games. However, I realize licensing might prove very difficult.

Or you could invade the fan fiction sites and post scenarios with stats and basic rules for play.

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I honestly think the best way to get the younguns is to do the first ever video game/p&p rpg tie-in. Then sell it at video game stores as a sourcebook/stand-alone p&p rpg game. It'll be just like what game companies already do for movie and television series. If you could get a video game franchise sourcebook, plus BRP rules, plus something like the Mythic Game Master Emulator Mythic Game Master Emulator all in one package, that would get tons of new, younger people to play the games. However, I realize licensing might prove very difficult.

Or you could invade the fan fiction sites and post scenarios with stats and basic rules for play.

Didnt they make a Street Fighter RPG?

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Surely there's already a World of Warcraft P&P RPG?

Britain has been infiltrated by soviet agents to the highest levels. They control the BBC, the main political party leaderships, NHS & local council executives, much of the police, most newspapers and the utility companies. Of course the EU is theirs, through-and-through. And they are among us - a pervasive evil, like Stasi.

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I think Street Fighter used the WoD system so you could have Guile fight brooding Emo Vampires.

I type this as the coughing fit subsides - soda was not intended to be consumed through the sinuses...

Thanks, PK Games, for helping me snark my drink through my nose!

Emerging from my Dark Age...

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Yes, I believe its D20. I think Street Fighter used the WoD system so you could have Guile fight brooding Emo Vampires.

There was also an AD&D adaption of of Diablo II by TSR (and later WotC for d20) and Alterernity-based Starcraft (also by WotC). Before that, I believe Steve Jackson did GURPS Myth.

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Wow, I stand very corrected. But I'll bet none of them got sold through a video game store. Which is where the younguns would buy them.

Actually, I remember seeing the Starcraft and Diablo II games at my local Gamestop in Seattle.

They also had some other game stuff, mostly WotC material.

I'd disagree with the notion that getting pen-and-paper RPGs into computer game stores would be an effective move, mostly because those stores are struggling to stay afloat now in a world of downloadable games, online retailers, video rental stores that also rent games, and big-box store competitors like Wal-Mart or Best Buy.

(I work in the computer games industry and we see a lot of market data about the condition of the retail games space... and most of it is not very promising.)

If anything, I think RPGs should be making more effort to get into the retail bookstore space (despite the returns policies). I go to my local B&N or Borders, and the only games they have are from WotC, White Wolf, and Games Workshop. There's plenty of Chaosium fiction, but no games. No Steve Jackson games. No HERO games. No Green Ronin or Mongoose stuff.

Another option would be for games companies to provide game clubs free or radically-discounted copies.

Additionally, game companies should focus on more "starter" games that are actually easy to play (D&D is not a starter game), and more emphasis on pre-packaged scenarios and campaigns to overcome the massive amount of work a GM has to do before a game can begin.

But that's just me.

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Actually, I remember seeing the Starcraft and Diablo II games at my local Gamestop in Seattle.

They also had some other game stuff, mostly WotC material.

I'd disagree with the notion that getting pen-and-paper RPGs into computer game stores would be an effective move, mostly because those stores are struggling to stay afloat now in a world of downloadable games, online retailers, video rental stores that also rent games, and big-box store competitors like Wal-Mart or Best Buy.

(I work in the computer games industry and we see a lot of market data about the condition of the retail games space... and most of it is not very promising.)

If anything, I think RPGs should be making more effort to get into the retail bookstore space (despite the returns policies). I go to my local B&N or Borders, and the only games they have are from WotC, White Wolf, and Games Workshop. There's plenty of Chaosium fiction, but no games. No Steve Jackson games. No HERO games. No Green Ronin or Mongoose stuff.

Another option would be for games companies to provide game clubs free or radically-discounted copies.

Additionally, game companies should focus on more "starter" games that are actually easy to play (D&D is not a starter game), and more emphasis on pre-packaged scenarios and campaigns to overcome the massive amount of work a GM has to do before a game can begin.

But that's just me.

I'll shut up now:ohwell:

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I'll shut up now:ohwell:

Don't feel bad. Real RPGs for Computer Games is a good idea. No-one's made it work spectacularly well yet, that's all.

If anything, I think RPGs should be making more effort to get into the retail bookstore space (despite the returns policies).

Would that really be worth it? I suspect not. OK, it's nice the local Waterstones has a shelf of big-name RPGs - but I didn't see a horde of eager young players flocking to it last time I was in there. If supermarkets are more successful than anywhere else, aren't they the outlet to use?

Additionally, game companies should focus on more "starter" games that are actually easy to play (D&D is not a starter game), and more emphasis on pre-packaged scenarios and campaigns to overcome the massive amount of work a GM has to do before a game can begin.

I think you're spot-on there. What would we need to include in a Starter BRP? Could it be a kids comic/magazine that supermarkets would sell? Kind of an updated White Dwarf, but mostly the core game rules with just a few extras tacked-on each month. Free weird dice with first issue...

Britain has been infiltrated by soviet agents to the highest levels. They control the BBC, the main political party leaderships, NHS & local council executives, much of the police, most newspapers and the utility companies. Of course the EU is theirs, through-and-through. And they are among us - a pervasive evil, like Stasi.

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Game store owners are very important as well...at least in my area. The gaming stores in this area host a lot of games right in the shop. Many kids flock there looking for something to do. The store owners have a huge influence on the games the kids pick up both role-playing and otherwise. As far as role-playing goes they do not like to carry non d20 games because they seem to sit on the shelf and are a bit of a gamble. If many store owners are convinced to switch to BRP you may see many new role-players make the switch as well.

The other thing that I think would help immensely is great artwork. This may be expensive, but it is very powerful. Games with stunning art are very hard not to pick up just to see what is inside the cover. I think that the art of D+D is one of the reasons it has never lost its stranglehold on the industry.

294/420

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I have played both Dungeons & Dragons Board Game | BoardGameGeek and HeroScape Master Set: Rise of the Valkyrie | BoardGameGeek with my children (ages 10 and 9). The former is particularly close to real [hack 'n slay] rolegames. Despite its name it's also actually closer to BRP than to D&D (characters use Magic Points to fuel their spells, and nothing prevents the Magic-User from using a 2H sword).

However, I haven't tried a real rolegame with them yet. I believe their attention span is still too short. I was 14 myself when I started playing D&D.

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I think that the art of D+D is one of the reasons it has never lost its stranglehold on the industry.

Yes the art is important, as are the props. But unfortunately both are expensive.

I guess the ideal introductory rolegame should have: nice painted miniatures, nice full colour character sheets, full colour gaming tiles, and possibly a set of (again) full colour cards for spells, weapons, creatures, etc. The players should be able to play by having a look at their character sheet and their cards only -- no boring manual. Only the GM should need a manual, which should be as short as possible (like the original 1981 BRPS booklet).

All IMHO.

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